Daring to Dance

It’s the season of dance, so to speak, in Antigua. A few weekends ago  was the end of year production of The Dance Centre (a ballet troupe I’m very familiar with from my niece’s dancing days) and coming up is the Antigua Dance Academy’s Rhythmic Nexus at the Dean William Lake Centre on July 3rd (6:30 p.m.). The latter, specializing in Afro-Caribbean folk dance is led by the uber-talented Veronica Yearwood and it’s always a good show (check it out). In between, held this past weekend, was Shiva’s School of Dance ‘sfusion of Reggae, Jazz, Caribbean, Urban American (i.e. Hip Hop), Eastern, African, and more from across the musical map. In fact, if I have one critique of the show on the rainy night I attended is that, entertaining as it was, and it was, it could have been condensed. But, if it had been, perhaps everyone, including and especially the little ones, would not have gotten so many opportunities to shine, and for the parents and family members packed under the tent no doubt that trade off is worth it.

shine

It was the little ones’ night to shine.

It’s always nice to see, parents and aunties and uncles, goddies and more out to support and encourage as our parents did during our school dance recitals (right?) And while the wee ones were the main reason I thought this post would be a good fit for Wadadli Pen – a site which encourages young people to express themselves and celebrates them when they do, I was there to cheer on one of the older ‘kids’, my friend Marcella who you can thank for the pictures in this post. With no dance background outside of natural rhythm, and performance experience more on the side of public speaking (using her words not her body), she began the year leaping in to and embracing the experience, and was practically glowing as she danced her way through several numbers including my favourites, the nostalgic Reggae number and the fierce African number at the end.

Big Spender

That’s her, third from left, with the big hair, during the crowdpleasing Hey Big Spender number.

African

Here’s the African number I mentioned…see that straight from the Motherland fierceness?

Reggae

That’s her in red during the old school Reggae number that asked (a la Musical Youth) “whatchu talking bout, you say you don’t like the reggae beat?”

One of my favourite numbers (though she wasn’t in this one) was Cell Block Tango from the musical Chicago.

cell block tango

*sings* “He had it coming, he had it coming, he only had himself to blame…”

I told you they were up and down and sideways on the musical map.

Go here to read about that other activity I went to this weekend that was also a positive experience for the youth.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, Fish Outta Water, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on  WordPress and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen, my books and writing, and/or my writing-and-editing services. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

 

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Links We Love, Literary Gallery

One response to “Daring to Dance

  1. Nice recap and visuals! Wish I was there!🙂

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