Celebrating Innovation: Team Project Jaguar Triumphs at DadliHack 2019

Let me make sure I have this right because it’s not my usual forte though it caught my interest because it was about motivating young people to innovate solutions to climate change – what I hear is encouraging young people to create. Right?

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That’s Team Project Jaguar of Antigua and Barbuda, the youngest team in the contest, collecting their $5000 prize at DadliHack 2019 for a “Data analysis system that logs data from events like Sargassum seaweed occurrences and meteorological data (sea surface temperature, tides, winds)…then applie(s) it to statistical algorithms to analyze patterns, trends and make predictions. Chemical sensors will be placed on relevant shorelines to detect and log the presence of Sargassum. The insight will be sold to hotels, restaurants and other stakeholders in the tourism industry so that they can prepare and tackle the problem before it even hits our shores. It’s all about being proactive rather than reactive to the effects of climate change on islands.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

This innovation – an online platform called NADIS – was adjudged winner alongside reportedly fierce competition from across the region (who did their three-minute pitches via skype), “based on criteria including speed of build and delivery of the solution, who and how many people they would be helping, and the self-resilience of the solution.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

Ocean Generation, according to their website, worked along with local company ACT, which supplied the high speed internet connection that allowed the hackathon teams to explore and develop their ideas; and the goal was to build climate change awareness among young people. “Ocean Generation held a tech training course for children ages 12-16 to develop their interests and inform them of the potential perils of climate change. The focus was on the urgency for an elevated infrastructure, and the required refurbished resilience as they pave the road ahead.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

Pitched ideas “ranged from community application to connect skilled laborers to find employment after natural disasters, to … a post-disaster drone system to identify crisis areas… (to) an idea to assist commercial and residential properties with energy efficient technology which can improve the energy management of small island developing states.” The panel of judges included Donna Levin (MIT business professor), Dr Martin Edlund CEO of Minesto, Jonas Michanek SONY/IDEON executive, alongside local Antiguan representatives.

Going forward a hub will be set up in Antigua and Barbuda to support not only the winners and to incubate their idea, but a variety of ideas from the DadliHack with the goal of activating and possibly testing winning climate change responses as soon as 2019.

Kudos.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (founder and coordinator of Wadadli Pen, and author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. Subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. 

There’s still time to vote in the #readAntiguaBarbuda #voteAntiguaBarbuda Readers Choice Book of the Year initiative.

 

2 Comments

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love

2 responses to “Celebrating Innovation: Team Project Jaguar Triumphs at DadliHack 2019

  1. Canice James

    I can’t believe I’m now seeing this, thanks for covering my story Joanne!

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