Category Archives: Caribbean Plus Lit News

Literary news of interest from the Caribbean and wider world

Calypso Rose wins World Music Award in France

Sunday, February 12, 2017 PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC) — Veteran Calypsonian Calypso Rose has won the World Album of the Year award at the Victoire de la Musique award ceremony in France.The award is considered the French equivalent of a Grammy award.

Rose’s album, Far from Home, competed against rock group Acid Arab with their album “Music of France” and Rokia Traore with her album “Born So”. Far From home, the platinum-selling album was released on the Because Music label on June 3 last year.

Rose, 75, began singing at the age of 15. She was born in Bethel, a small, relatively in-land village in Tobago.

Although she garnered several regional hits throughout the years, including her most famous, “Fire, Fire”, which she wrote in 1966 she did not win any of the major calypso contests until 1977. That year, she was the first woman ever to win the Trinidad and Tobago Road March Competition with “Tempo”. A year later, she won the National Calypso King Competition — which prompted a name change (it’s now called the National Calypso Monarch Competition) — with “I Thank Thee” and “Her Majesty”. That same year, Rose won the Trinidad Road March Competition for the second year successive year, with “Gimme More Tempo”.

Throughout her career, she has headlined at major venues and festivals throughout the US, Europe and Australia.

As of 2011, she is the most decorated calypsonian in Trinidad and Tobago’s history… Read more.

Leave a comment

Filed under Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery

A & B Artistes in International Soca Finals

Exif JPEG

Throwback photo of Tizzy during Antigua’s Carnival (file photo/Joanne C. Hillhouse)

Ricardo Drue and Tanzania “Tizzy” Sebastian have secured final positions in the International Soca Monarch competition.

Last Friday, it was announced on the competition’s Facebook page that both local artistes had advanced from the semi-finals to the finals, along with 18 others from across the region to include Blaxx, Iwer George and Farmer Nappy out of Trinidad & Tobago, and Peter Ram from Barbados.

Ricardo Drue has made an appeal to the public to support both artistes going into the finals via social media and any other possible way. Read more.

16711467_1356842381041241_8537102990254991324_n

Quick Facts

Tizzy  
Lead vocalist El A Kru
Birth Name Tanzania Sebastian
From Greenbay, Antigua
Breakthrough/Biggest hit ‘Expose’
Awards include International Soca Awards as Best New Female Soca Artiste, Female Soca Performer of the Year, and Favourite Uptempo Soca Female
In 2016 inked a 3-year distribution deal with VP Records
Joined the Roy Cape All Stars for T & T Carnival 2017
2017 marks her third trip to the International Soca Finals
She has performed on international stages the US to Belgium to China always waving the Antiguan Barbudan flag, literally

Ricardo Drue
Former member of all-male vocal and dance group Crossovah
Birth Name Ricardo Barriteau
From Fort Road, Antigua, grew up in Trinidad
Hit song ‘Vagabond’ featured in the video for Nas Album Done by Nas and DJ Khaled (2016)
Digicel Brand Ambassador & Antigua and Barbuda Cultural Ambassador
Last won Antigua’s Groovy Monarch title with 2016’s ID (Stamp Yuh Name)
Last won Antigua’s Jumpy Monarch title in 2015
Placed second in the International Soca Monarch competition with ‘Vagabond’ in 2015
Won back-to-back Antigua Jumpy Monarch twice (2014, 2015)
Has worked with Imij and Company and Roy Cape All Stars
Father of four

The story is Observer’s, the bottom image is taken from and links back to the International Soca Awards facebook page, the top picture and the quick facts research by Joanne C. Hillhouse – respect the hustle. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery

The Other Daughter

Re new fictional publication, The Other Daughter in Adda, an online publication of the Commonwealth Writers organization in the UK. Thought I’d blog the journey to publication of this particular piece as part of my blog’s mission to share the ins and outs of #TheWritingLife *** I’m always writing. The Other Daughter is one of […]

via Adda Mi Seh: Journey to Publication (The Other Daughter) — jhohadli

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery, The Business, Wadadli Pen News

Caribbean Literature loses a Champion

“The University of the West Indies was thrown into mourning yesterday*, following the death of Dr Giselle Rampaul, a lecturer in Literatures in English in the Faculty of Humanities.

Rampaul, 40, died suddenly on Thursday while warded at the West Shore Medical Private Hospital in West Moorings. Rampaul, of Couva, passed away at about 2.30 pm.

Relatives were said to be very distraught over her passing and expressed utter shock, especially given the fact that Rampaul was not suffering from any ailment.

She has published work on the intersections between British and Caribbean literature; and was working on a monograph on Shakespeare in the Caribbean. She was also the founder and producer of The Spaces between Words: Conversations with Writers podcast series.”

Read more.

*Yesterday here would refer to February 10th 2017 as the article was published to the Trinidad and Tobago Guardian website on February 11th 2017.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Caribbean Plus Lit News

Obeah Woman

I first heard this poem at a youth forum held during Independence. One of my co-panelists used it as an example in literary analysis. It made me want to read more of Antiguan and Barbudan poet Eileen Hall. But her work is out of print. I’ll share just this bit (hopefully staying within fair use parameters) just because as a country we should be aware of our artists (albeit that Wikepedia lists Hall as an American poet while in the same posting acknowledging  that she is Antiguan born to parents who had been in Antigua for generations). No profit is being made from this sharing and no copyright infringement is intended.

Obeah Woman by Eileen Hall

So lef’ me, ef you waan’a feel
How p’isin sting from manchineel.
De bruk leaf blister w’ere ‘e touch.
Who tek lub easy, no’ lub much.
Ef you min’in’ gal dat talk so neat
An’ ack so lollice in de street
Goin’ pung de root ub a pepper tree
Fu’ t’row wit’ sugar in yo’ tea.
A’ done wit’ studyin’ right an’ wrang.
So ‘memba, me no ‘fraid to hang.

 

What’s your interpretation of this work?

 

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, Caribbean Plus Lit News

Reading Room and Gallery 22

The Reading Room and Gallery is a space where I share things I come across that I think you might like too  – some are things of beauty, some just bowl me over with their brilliance, some are things I think we could all learn from, some are artistes I want to support by spreading the word, and some just because. Let’s continue to support the arts and the artistes by rippling the water together. For earlier iterations of the Reading Room and Gallery, use the search feature to the right. This is the 22nd one which means there are 21 earlier ones (can’t link them all). Remember to keep checking back, this list will grow as I make new finds until it outgrows this page and I move on to the next one.

CREATIVES ON THE BUSINESS

“Mastering other things taught me that one becomes something not by wishing to be, but by learning to be. Mastery is the result of hard work. And ardor.  And the slow accretion of knowledge that comes from study and from practice.”- Mary Jo Bang

VISUAL

tpa-islandEric Fischl’s A Visit To/A Visit From/The Island uses two adjoining large canvases to contrast vastly disparate groups of people seemingly in the same setting. On the left he depicts what appears to be a white upper-middle-class American family of four vacationing at a sunny, holiday resort. The second panel portrays a frantic scene in which a group of black men and women, who appear to be refugees, try to pull themselves from a bluish black churning sea. Rendered in much darker, ominous hues than those of its counterpart, the frenzied image was based on a photograph of Haitian refugees arriving on the Florida coast. While the two canvases depict jarringly different scenes, the similarities between the images also emphasize their polarity. For instance, both depict foreshortened naked bodies lying diagonally in the foreground, highlighting the stark shifts in color and context between the panels. The relaxed laziness of the tourists pitted against the desperation of the Haitians emphasizes the inequalities between the two groups and the irony in the choices that racial difference and privilege allow—the whites are paying to visit an island that the residents risk their lives to leave.
Artist: Eric Fischl
Image: “A Visit To / A Visit From / The Island,” (1983)
Source: The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York website

CREATIVES ON CREATING

“You have to learn how to interpret and not just imitate” – Jake Gyllenhall, breaking down his process

***

“Don’t tell anyone the story until you’ve written it.  At least this is advice I wish I’d heard and listened to, early on.  I’ve found that if I tell my friends about any story or book I’m working on, I begin to lose enthusiasm for it – not because of their reaction or anything they’ve said but because, having said it, it’s like I feel less need to actually write it.  That’s difficult to explain but perhaps other writers will understand.” – Eugenia O’Neal blogs ‘My Top Writing Tips’

***

“A slight girl with fawn’s eyes offers a plastic cup of water-angels to my mother. A fallen bamboo ceiling swallows the moon whole. There is so much wonder, awe and terror in every gesture, every movement. The moon washes the dust from her face, becomes her true self in the forest. Then it solidifies, comes together…” – Danielle Boodoo Fortune blogging on her Moon Water series of paintings

***

“Here I was trying to get my daughter to stick to a specific formula for writing, and she was forging her own path. What worked best for her was writing by the seat of her pants, starting on the computer and editing as she wrote. The funny thing is, it is the same method I use.” – from One Size Fits All by Jewel Amethyst

***

“On my way home from work tomorrow, I will bring myself to stop at Kinko’s and print out all one-hundred and seventy pages of my crappy first draft. I will hole-bunch the pages, stick it into a three-hole binder and get up Saturday morning, procrastinate a lot, curse out my editor, and then bring myself one step closer to the sweet pain of publication.” – Kara Stevens on what you need to know if you’re serious about becoming an author

POETRY

“Unexpectedly,
The street light began
To malfunction,
Coming on and off,
Plunging me into bouts of
Darkness and light.

Buzz, crackle, darkness,
Buzz, crackle, light.” – From Kimolisa Mings’ Dark Warrior

***

***

“What if I told you
I’d never made love before” – from What the Spirit Knows by Soyini Ayanna Forde at SX Salon

***

“I was left there, tutu shredded,

I couldn’t dance

anymore.” – This did not happen by Thylias Moss

INTERVIEW

“Many of my poems start with an image, but these started with language and weaved through images bringing me places I hadn’t been in a while.” – Angela Voras-Hills at the KR Conversations

***

“One thing that I went in to Yale with was to make to sure I left exactly how I came in, because that’s who they accepted. Take what you need, get what you need for your tool belt, but don’t lose the essence of who you are. I think I did it.” – Atlanta’s Bryan Tyree Henry (aka Paper Boi)

***

“The revolution for all Black lives starts in the mind and manifests in the physical, so I hope this book that contains so much true history mixed in with fiction can help people understand that nobody gets free unless we’re all free.” – Brooke Obie

FICTION

“She had looked him down, vaguely surprised and annoyed, with the air of those who are never asked where they are going.” – from Le Silence de Chagos by Shenaz Patel

***

“Sometimes I’d stare in the mid-darkness at how white he was. If I pressed his skin, he’d bruise deep fuchsia and you’d be able to see it even in the dark. I was very dark compared to him. He was so white it was freaky, sometimes. Othertimes it was kind of cool and beautiful, how his skin would glow against mine, how our bodies together looked like art.” – from Gideon by ZZ Packer

***

“You’re in this together now, and some part of you hopes you die together for the sake of simplicity.” – Last Chapter on Hotel Stationary: a Short Story by Ursula Villarreal-Moura

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery, The Business, Wadadli Pen News

A & B Artistes Discussing Their Art

Primarily, in this space, I’ll be sharing discussions, in Question and Answer format, of craft and insights to not only the author/artist’s journey but the story of the arts in Antigua and Barbuda. This is a Work in Progress. The main criteria, so far, for inclusion, apart from the Q & A structure, is that these are interviews not conducted by someone who is part of the artistes’ publishing and/or promotional team, and are interviews that are in the public sphere on a platform independent of the artistes and/or their publishing and promotional team. Beyond that, it’s what I come across and you can also link me interviews that fit the very broad stated criteria by emailing wadadipen@gmail.com

B

Tammi Browne Bannister talking to David DaCosta (December 28th 2016):
“When I was little, I loved reading Aesop’s Fables and was attracted to the humor, the lessons, and the tragedies and of course the way these tales made me think about the characters long after reading. I’ve written a few.” Full interview.

F

Cray Francis talking with Good Morning Antigua Barbuda (April 5th 2016):
“I felt like I had to write my own stories.”

H

joanne26

Joanne C. Hillhouse talking to M. J. Fievre at the Whimsical Project (November 21st 2014):
“Calypso, the calypso at that time, sang the things people were afraid to say and reflected the concerns and reality of the folk, authentically, in their voice, in a way that stirred spirits. I think there’s a part of me that strives for that in my writing.” Full interview.

Joanne C. Hillhouse talking to Commonwealthwriters.org (2014):
“I use a lot of detail, a lot of specificity in rendering the world, and I write from a very character-driven place – Who are they? What do they want? What is their truth (don’t compromise on telling their truth)? Why should we care?” Full interview.

J

TamekaJTameka Jarvis-George talking with SheRox:
“I initially did not start out with the intention to write a whole book. I started writing what I thought was a short story, but it just wouldn’t end.” Full interview.

Jazzie B. talking with Chris Williams for Wax Poetics (May 14th 2014):
“’Keep On Movin’ actually came about lyrically because we were at the Africa Center in Covent Gardens, and we were being put under a lot of pressure by the police. It was due to the fact that other clubs in the area were empty and ours kept being full. Every so often, we would get the squeeze put on us. At one particular moment, they threatened to close us down. The whole concept of this song came from there.” Full interview.

Clifton Joseph talking with Ian Ferrier (2007):
“Hip Hop, Dub Poetry, Dancehall, Reggae all sort of come out of the same African inspired, Caribbean, American, emphasis on words, rhythm, repetition; all of those things pull from the same pool of stylistic influences.”

K

JamaicaJamaica Kincaid talking with Mother Jones (January/February 2013):
‘I think I was trying to understand how, short of an accident—you know, you pick up the phone, he says, “Your mother is dead. Her car. The Earth fell”—I never expected the everyday to suddenly become an accident. Suddenly you go downstairs and the pine floor is a gravel pit. I was trying to understand how the everyday suddenly becomes the unexpected.’ Full interview.

L

JoyLapps1Joy Lapps talking with Joanne C. Hillhouse (December 2nd 2012):
“I think that my strengths lie in composition and writing lyrics for music composed by others and by myself. My inspiration comes from my lived experience and some things I read about or see on the news, my spirituality and love of God, falling in love with my husband, the everyday challenges of life…etc.” Full interview.

Natasha Lightfoot talking with Renee Goldthree for Black Perspectives (April 4th 2016):
“In the UWI archives, there was an almanac for the West Indies in the nineteenth century, and it contained an entry in the year 1858 for Antigua. The entry mentioned that there had been a riot and that the island’s jails were completely full, but it also claimed that the riot was nothing of any political significance. The entry suggested that the rioters were basically rabble in the streets causing trouble—and not at all political. That entry raised my antenna so to speak. I thought that the way the entry was written was a sign that whatever had occurred was very political: there had been a riot in the streets for several days and the jails were full of rioters. I wanted to figure out what happened and why.” Full interview.

O

Dorbrene O’Marde talking with Judd Batchelor at Batchelor of Arts Theatre Online (2016):
“And one of the comments I made -which seemed to rattle some of the young writers, was the total absence of socio political concerns in this region, at this particular point in time when there is so much need for concern and there is so much need for understanding the post-colonial independence bind that we find ourselves in, that our leaders find themselves in that we as persons trying to inform leadership have not really clarified for ourselves. And my view of the role of the artist is to help in that clarification.” Full interview.

R

Paul ‘King Obstinate’ Richards:
“We’re prophets; a lot of things we write about comes true.” (King Obstinate on calypso, September 2013)

PHOTO credits: Pictures of Joanne C. Hillhouse and Joy Lapps are from the 2011 event Telling our Stories at the University of Toronto – event photo; of Tameka Jarvis George is from the 2006 Wadadli Pen/Museum literary showcase Word Up! – event photo/Laura Hall; of Jamaica Kincaid is from the 2014 University of the Virgin Islands literary festival – event photo.

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Wadadli Pen founder and coordinator Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, Fish Outta Water, and With Grace). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out http://jhohadli.wordpress.com Please note that, except otherwise noted, images on this site also need to be cleared if you wish to use them for any purpose. Thanks.

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery, The Business