Category Archives: Wadadli Pen 2005

Listing of winners and prizes received in 2005

Lucky Dollar by Sarah Ann Li

For  the  past  few  weeks,  everyone  in  my  family  had  been  on  edge. My  mother  was    ill  and  needed  to have an  operation  and  all  the  doctors  we had visited recommended  one hospital  in  Miami  Florida.  Our  problem  was  that  we  couldn’t   afford  the  operation, (but)  we  were  advised  to  have  it  done  soon.

As  I  looked  around  my  small  but  tidy  room,  worrying  about  my  mother’s  health,  I  felt  useless. Was there anything I could do?  I  slowly  got  up  from  my  bed  and  began  walking  towards  the  door. It  was  Saturday,  I  helped  mama  with  the  morning  chores  while  my  dad  and  brother  left  for  work.  When  I   was  finished,  I  asked  mom’s  permission  to  go  play  with  my  best  friend  Sasha.  “Be  careful  and  come  back  before  lunch,” she  said,  softly.  I kissed  her  and  left.

As  I stepped  outside,  I  was  greeted  by  the  inviting  fresh  air.  The  birds  were  singing  sweetly  and  the  palm  trees  were  swaying  in  the  cool  breeze,  occasionally  hiding  the  brilliant  sun. I  nonchalantly  walked  along  the  sidewalk,  glancing  around  me  every  once  in  a  while.  Suddenly I noticed a glimmer up ahead.  Curiously, I quickly walked towards it.  It was a shiny dollar.  As  I  bent  to  pick  it  up  I  felt  lucky.  “It’s only a dollar,” I told myself, “I can’t do much with that.”  I was approaching Mr.  Black’s  Candy  shop  and decided  to get  some  candies  for  Sasha  and  me.

In front  of  the  shop,  I  noticed  a  sign  which  said  Caribbean  Lottery  $1.2 million dollars. The  drawing  of  this  was  after  lunch.  Once inside the shop, my mouth began to water.  The  delicious  aroma  of  chocolate  sherbets  and  fudges  tickled  my  nose.  I handed   Mr.  Black  my  dollar  and   skipped  out  of  the  shop  feeling  satisfied  with  my  purchase.  I then continued on to Sash’s home.  We  played   a  bunch  of  games  with  some  other  children  in  the  neighborhood,   including  cricket.  I was free of worry during that time.  I  had  much  fun  but  had  to leave  since I  promised  mom  I would  be home before  lunch.

I   ran   as  fast  as  I   could,  almost  stumbling  into  Benny,  my  neighbor’s  dog.  I  quickly  patted  his  head  and  continued  to run  towards  my  home.  Upon  arriving,  I  shouted  to mama  that  I  was  home.  My  heart  was  pounding  as  I  sat  down  next  to  our  very  old  transistor  radio. With paper  and  pen  in  hand,  I  sat  poised;  excited,  hoping,  praying  and  waiting.  After  taking  the  winning  lottery  numbers  down  I  slipped  my  ticket  out  of  my  pocket  and   nervously  but  carefully  compared  the numbers.

Sarah Ann Li was one of three Wadadli Pen finalists to receive Optimist awards in 2005; the others were Rilys Adams and Sandrena Martin.

Who  could  have  thought  my  day  was  going  to  turn  out  like  that?  Yes, I had gotten the winning ticket!  I  dashed  into  mom’s  room  and  told  her  the  wondrous  news;  my  dad  and  my  brother  walked  in for  lunch  at  the  same  moment.  We all hugged each other in a tight, emotional hug. The  lord  had  answered  our  prayers,  words  could  not  express  the  feelings  which  flowed  through  us.  Mom was going to be well again.  “Thank you, Lord, for this miracle,” I prayed, silently.  I  felt  I  could  fly  as  the  weight  was  lifted  off  me.

One  week  later  mama  had  the  operation  and  everything  was  successful.  The stress and worry were gone. We  all  continued  our  normal  lives  and   had  so  much  to  be  thankful  for.

NOTE: Sarah Ann Li was the Best Writer Under 12 in 2005.

 THE END

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE
Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

Comments Off on Lucky Dollar by Sarah Ann Li

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005

Awaken to the Night by Kennella Charles

[2005 Young Explorer Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Honourable Mention]

The calypsos of the birds outside were muffled by the curtains of the Edward twins’ bedroom, as Rupert Edward pushed aside his bedcovers and ascended towards his brother’s bed mischievously. He was up to no good as usual, attempting to scare his brother out of bed, and by blurting out a single name, succeeded in his boisterous plan.

“Wha happen, Robert, wha mek you so jumpy?” he asked, snickering devilishly.

“You have plenty nerves!” Roger said out of breath, trying to conceal his tears. “You well know that me ‘fraid a de bogyman!”

“Me! Is not me mek him come here a night time,” Rupert reveled.

“Mama Estha!” Robert cried out, tears flowing. In no time their grandmother entered their bedroom door to be greeted by a tearful Robert.

“Wha eh be this time, Rupert, wha trouble-making you up to?” she said as she held Robert, trying to calm him.

Esther Edward was the only living person who could distinguish between her identical grandsons. Mama Estha, as her grandsons called her, was a round woman and a strong believer in God. She had been helping their ever-so-busy father, Ron Edward to raise them ever since their mother, Victoria, died, shortly after giving birth to her mirror twins. Mama Estha loved and treated her only grandchildren as though she had birthed them. Their father was always too busy to raise them himself and usually traveled abroad on business trips. Esther could tell them apart anywhere; back, front, even before they spoke. She truly knew her boys well, even when one had been sad or the other naughty.

“Me ain’t do the fraidy cat nothing, Mama Estha.”

“He lie!” yelled Robert.

“All right, enought a that from de two a you! Rupert, go in me room and read de whole a chapta six in Ephesians.”\

“Mama Estha.”

“Me don talk!” she ordered, still comforting Robert as the other brother stormed to his grandmother’s room.

Radiance of a few rays from the sun seeped trough the bedroom windows and danced on the walls. The abundance of sunlight had been occluded by the abundance of lofty trees, which shielded the barely seen house in the vast countryside.

“He call out de bogyman name when me still a sleep and me wake up,” Robert said, still sobbing. “Last night me hear eh by de window.”

“Hush with you nonsense now; ain’t no such thing as de bogyman. I don’t know wha mek you always mek you brother get the best of you.”

“But Mama Estha me hear eh mek noise outside by de window.”

“You listen to me, see. Maybe a de branches pan de tree by you window when de wind a blow or de fruit bats a fly a night,” she suggested and smiled at him.

“Bats!” he shivered with open eyes. “ That a wha Rupert say de bogyman tun into a night.”

“Nothing tall go so. De fruit bats harmless; de only thing them bite a fruit, not arwe,” she said, assuring him.

He agreed with a nod, but, in his mind, his brother’s exaggerated tales were still lurking.

Since school was closed for the summer, the twins spent the course of their days on their own activities. Rupert being bolder, both far more mischievous and more adventuresome, usually went about his day as a nuisance, while Robert, the more responsible one for an eight year old, helped his grandmother do most of the tasks in and around the house.

As the summer sounds droned on that day, Robert assisted his grandmother in tending to her garden along with a few other chores. Rupert’s schedule consisted of torturing a neighbor’s cat, dismembering a bird’s nest and other terrible duties.

Later in the night, when the boys finished praying and retired to bed, their grandmother slightly opened the window’s shutters to allow some of the night’s cool atmosphere into the room. The nocturnal creatures blossomed to the quartered moon that shined through the windows, investing every thing in the rooms with a calm unnatural luminosity. A pair of short, broad wings extended to take flight, as a grayish-brown figure fluttered along with squeaks of navigation towards an array of fruit trees.

Unaware of a stalking owl, the solitary bat almost became prey to the clutching claws of the night bird. Instead it got injured and found sanctuary by a nearby window ledge at the twins’ bedroom. There was a soft thud on the floor, with an alarming squeak, which startled and woke both boys. Rupert jumped out of bed, then turned on the light without hesitation, and found, to their surprise, a wounded bat, active on their bedroom floor.

Fear came after both boys like a shadow, as they bellowed for their grandmother. To her amazement, when she hastily entered their room both boys were crying and nestled on one bed, pointing to where the uproar began. She then glanced in the direction of the wide-eyed bat.

“All a this racket over a little bat?” she asked, soothingly, as she approached her grandsons with opened arms. “It ain’t no jumby or de bogyman, and it more scared a you than you is a it.”

“No, it a come from eating…somebody, that a way…de blood from!” Rupert stammered.

“No, baby, it look like it hurt.”

“Is not the bogyman?” Robert asked with some relief.

“No, is not no fable a de bogyman. Maybe a this same bat da a you window de otha night.”

Rupert reflected on how ridiculously he had reacted and apologized for teasing his brother about always being scared easily. They both learned a valuable lesson that night and shared an inseparable bond from then on.

THE END

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE
Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

Comments Off on Awaken to the Night by Kennella Charles

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005

Who won in 2005?

2005 Wadadli Pen winners (front from left K. Charles, C. Beazer, S. Li, V. Benta; back R. Adams and S. Martin) flanked by Youth Minister Winston Williams and Wadadli Pen chief judge, D. Gisele Isaac.

*In addition to prizes mentioned, all winners receive a certificate from the YE WYPP team.

Also, special prize to the school with the most submissions – Buckley’s Primary – 20 books donated by Macmillan Publishers. This included copies of Backfire and Act of God (various authors); Baba and Mr. Big, Full Circle: The Rami Johnson Story, A Cow called Boy, and Big Doc Bitterroot (C. Everard Palmer); The Legend of St. Ann’s Flood (Debbie Jacob); Caribbean Folk Tales and Fantasies (Michael Anthony); The Annihilation of Fish and Other Stories (Anthony Winkler); and The Boy from Willow Bend (Joanne C. Hillhouse)

Honourable Mention – Under-12 Category:

 Chatrisse Beazer, 10, Irene B. Williams School student for her story A Scary Night.

Prize Package:

  • Big Banana gift certificate
  • Best of Books gift certificate [valued at EC$40]
  • EC$100 cash – YE WYPP [thanks to American Women’s Club & Daily Observer contributions]
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘The Boy from Willow Bend’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) courtesy Macmillan
  •  Teddy Bear – HERO

Honourable Mention – General:

 Debesha S. A. Grant, 18, for her story Blue Mountain Hike.

Prize Package:

  • Images.Cam photo package
  • Motion in Poetry book/CD combo – Motion/Women’s Press
  • EC$100 cash – YE WYPP [thanks to American Women’s Club & Daily Observer contributions]
  •  YE WYPP certificate for ‘Dancing Nude in the Moonlight’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘Brother Man’ (Roger Mais) courtesy Macmillan

Kennella Charles, 16, Ottos Comprehensive student, for her story Awaken to the Night.

Prize Package:

  • Images.Cam photo package
  • The Source gift certificate [valued at EC$125]
  • EC$100 cash – YE WYPP [thanks to American Women’s Club & Daily Observer contributions]
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘Dancing Nude in the Moonlight’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘There’s No Place Like’ (Tessa McWatt) courtesy Macmillan

Verdanci Benta, 12, Antigua Girls High School student, for her story Boysie’s Fixed Account.

Prize Package:

  • Woods Pharmacy Gift Certificate [valued at EC$100]
  •  Best of Books Gift Certificate [ valued at EC$40]
  • EC$100 cash – YE WYPP [thanks to American Women’s Club & Daily Observer contributions]
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘The Hummingbird Tree’ (Ian McDonald) & ‘Butler, Til the Final Bell’ (Michael Anthony) courtesy Macmillan

BEST UNDER 12 WRITER

Best Under-12 Writer:

Sarah Ann Li, 11, St. Andrew’s School student, for her story Lucky Dollar.

Prize Package:

  • Happy Kids Gift Certificate [valued at EC$150]
  • Caribbean Helicopters [US$80 voucher for tour]
  • Red portfolio, mini-portfolio & paints – Harper’s
  • EC$150 cash – YE WYPP [thanks to American Women’s Club & Daily Observer contributions]
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘The Boy from Willow Bend’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘Going Home and Other Tales from Guyana’ (Deryck Bernard) courtesy Macmillan
  • Teddy Bear – HERO

TOP THREE WRITERS

Third Place:

Liscia Lawrence, 17, Clare Hall Secondary School student, for her story Misinterpreted.

Prize Package:

  • EC$350 Food voucher – Anjo Wholesale
  • Jolly Beach day pass for two
  • EC$100 Kool Net gift certificate
  • Benetton bag
  • EC$50 Best of Books gift certificate [courtesy Cedric Holder and the Cushion Club]
  • ‘Motion in Poetry’ – Motion/Women’s Press
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘Dancing Nude in the Moonlight’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘Brother Man’ (Roger Mais) courtesy Macmillan

Second Place:

Rilys Adams, 15, Antigua Girls High School student, for her story Fictional Reality.

Prize Package:

  • Two LIAT tickets
  • Citizen watch and bracelet [from Colombian Emeralds]
  • Best of Books Gift Certificate [valued at $60]
  • EC$100 Kool Net gift certificate
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘Dancing Nude in the Moonlight’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘Ginger Lily’ (Margaret Knight) courtesy Macmillan

Winner:

Sandrena Martin, 16, Antigua State College student, for her story The Torturer.

Prize Package:

  • Personal Internet Communicator [MAX]– Cable and Wireless

    Me, Joanne C. Hillhouse, collecting the Cable and Wireless contribution from Corporate Communications Manager Paula Lee.

  • BWIA ticket to any Caribbean destination
  • Cross Pen – Stephen B. Shoul [est. value EC$120]
  •  ‘Bein’ Black’– Althea Prince/ Insomniac Press/ Canadian Scholars’ Press
  • EC$100 Kool Net gift certificate
  • YE WYPP certificate for ‘Dancing Nude in the Moonlight’ (Joanne C. Hillhouse) & ‘Such as I have’ (Garfield Ellis) courtesy Macmillan
  • Teddy Bear – HERO

Leave a comment

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005

Blue Mountain Hike by Debesha S. A. Grant

[2005 Young Explorer Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Honourable Mention]


An annual event, the three day Blue Mountain camping trip kept Tieka on a high for weeks. An event that only a select few were allowed to attend and she could not believe that she had been chosen!

When she arrived at the pickup area she saw that forty students were present, not including the coaches and other adults invited along for the excursion.

They arrived at Mavis Bank at five pm Friday evening, and Tieka, like all the other
newcomers, was bursting with the knowledge that she would finally experience
what she had heard about on numerous occasions. Next year she would be telling
the tales.
During the seven hour wait they were instructed by Sean to repack in order to
make space in their bags to carry food, evoking complaints from
many.

As the time drew nearer to 12 midnight, the departure time, the feeling
of anxiety and excitement intensified. They were put in three groups, and, armed
with flashlights, their only protection against the dark of night, they set off on their estimated six hour journey.  They set off downhill and Tieka began to wonder if the
stories she had heard about the strenuous uphill climb had not been
exaggerated.  The atmosphere was festive, filled with the sound of
laughter and chatter.

Their first obstacle was a river with only a fallen tree stretching from bank to bank, sparse boulders within their only means of reaching the other side.  That hurdle
overcome, they began their journey uphill.  Uphill and uphill and uphill they went,
and uphill still.  The more they ascended the cooler the air got, cooling down their
tired, hot and weary bodies.

With each light Tieka saw, she hoped that they had reached. After the first
two hours, the realization set in that they still had a long way to go.

Leaving the houses and lights behind, the night sounds set in; the
rushing of a stream in the distance, the chirping of crickets, the rush of breeze
through the tall Willow and Spruce trees, the sound of dragging
feet – tired and weary.

After four hours, and without realizing it, Tieka began the climb of the famous Jacobs Ladder, a mini mountain in itself.  With the faint light of the approaching dawn, the first trees that make the world renowned Blue Mountain Coffee were seen, and also the first set of signs to campers. Tieka kicked into autopilot, walking only because she knew that she had to, and, if she did not, she would be left behind, feeling like each step would be her last.

Almost at the top, she caught up with the others who had stopped at a lookout/rest spot overlooking Kingston. The view was exquisitely breathtaking; Kingston, Papine and miles of green lush coffee and other trees laying below, with the first ray of dawn barely touching the towns.

After a fifteen minute rest and snack break, they were all refreshed and rearing to go.  Reaching the top of Jacobs Ladder, Breezy Gully was pointed out to them.  Upon hearing that they had about 45 minutes, an hour at most, to go Tieka began to walk faster, anticipation giving extra strength.

“WELCOME TO PORTLAND GAP, bunkhouses to the left.”

Tieka could not believe it. She read the sign twice.  With a burst of energy, all the previous
weariness was forgotten as she took off at a run.  Reaching the bunkhouse, she was told to take a bed and fall in, and, after finding an appropriate bunk, she settled in.

“I made it, I reached,” thought Tieka, right before she fell asleep.
THE END

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE

Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse – coordinator of the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize, and author of The Boy from Willow Bend and Dancing Nude in the Moonlight. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

Comments Off on Blue Mountain Hike by Debesha S. A. Grant

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005

A Scary Night by Chatrisse Beazer

[2005 Young Explorer Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Honourable Mention – Under 12 Category]

As I got ready to go to bed, I kissed everybody goodnight and went upstairs. I stepped into my bedroom. It looked very dark and the owls were hooting mournfully. My bed was cold. I felt scared.

“It feels spooky,” I said to myself with a shudder.

I went into the cupboard to get a flashlight to defend myself against anyone who could possibly come into my room. I pushed my head under the pillow and clutched the flashlight tightly.

A few minutes went by. Then, was it my ears deceiving me or did I hear howling? I listened carefully. I did hear it. And it was in my own bedroom!!! I peered from under the pillow cautiously. My heart was beating so hard I could feel it coming up my neck. I saw two white things that looked like ghosts. I screamed,

“Mommy!!!”

Then one of them came near the bed. I took up the flashlight to hit it on its head. I expected my flashlight to hit empty space, but it landed hard on its head. I realized that it was a person and not a ghost! I got very angry and pulled the sheet off their heads. It was my very own brother and sister.

“How dare you!” I shouted.

They laughed.

“How dare you!” I screamed.

“We did it to scare you,” John said.

“Both of you are just disgusting!” I shouted.

“Scaredy cat! Scaredy cat!” Amy jeered.

I stormed downstairs and told my Mom and she called then down and said,

“No television, no friends over for the week, no computer. Oh, and you will go to bed early, at seven-thirty, before Chatrisse.”

As we went upstairs I taunted them,

“Early birds, early birds!”

“Chatrisse!” my mother called from downstairs.

I sped into my bedroom and slept peacefully.

 

THE END

 

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE

Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse – coordinator of the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize, and author of The Boy from Willow Bend and Dancing Nude in the Moonlight. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

Comments Off on A Scary Night by Chatrisse Beazer

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005

Boysie’s Fixed Account by Verdanci Benta

[2005 Young Explorer Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Honourable Mention]

Verdanci Benta workshopped her story in the Wadadli Pen workshop before the competition; here she is hard at work.

Boysie was a regular jack-of-all-trades who was more often out of work than in.

In order to save his family from hunger he often ‘trusted’ goods from the ‘Wayside Grocery Shop’, the only shop in Dryriver village.

The ‘Wayside Grocery Shop’ was a wooden, old-fashioned grocery shop with a long counter that separated the goods from the customers. The shelves were neatly stacked. Hanging from a nail over the highest shelf was a clip-board crowded with bills and other valuable documents. On one far end of the counter was a large, heavy-looking scale for weighing goods like sugar and red herring. At the other far end of the counter was a cage-like compartment from which adult stuff such as rum and cigarettes were sold.

Boysie’s connection to the ‘Wayside Grocery Shop’ goes way back to his childhood and he seemed to have inherited the habit of taking goods on credit, but, unlike his mother, he was a bad debtor.

“See you next week, Miss Ruby,” he would say to the shop-keeper when reminded to pay.

Miss Ruby, hands akimbo, would always reply, “Boysie, if it wasn’t for your wife and children, I would let you starve.” But Boysie knew better and just kept on ‘trusting’ goods from Miss Ruby.

But Boysie was soon to find out another side of Miss Ruby that he had never seen before.

“Boysie, I hear that you working for big money now,” Miss Ruby shouted out to him one Friday night while the regular guys were under the mango tree building and breaking up law. Boysie’s voice had risen above the others because he felt that he knew everything about income tax.

Being the only shop in the village, in and around the ‘Wayside Grocery Shop’ was always teeming with activity. The age-old ‘lazy bench’ outside under the mango tree was where the villagers and passersby would sit and chat, and one of its frequent visitors was Boysie.

“Man, no country can run without income tax!” he told the group of men, the majority of whom were Labourites. But Boysie was so taken up with his argument that he did not hear Miss Ruby.

“Boysie, you cyarn’t hear Miss Ruby talking to you? You making big money now,” Sukie called out.

“Go in and pay your debt, man, and when you finish, go and pay up your income tax, too!” mused Jakie.

But Boysie did not like where the discussion was heading. News had obviously reached Miss Ruby that he had a construction job.

So, when he finally went into the shop to explain his position to Miss Ruby, he felt like a school-boy on his way to the principal’s office to explain why he did not do his homework.

“Miss Ruby, I have a fixed account at the bank. I can’t draw any money under six months. Please, give me a break ‘til next mont’,” he said as Miss Ruby, with deft fingers, sifted through her thick records for all his bills.

“Here. Pay up all or none, Sa!” she said as she handed over the bills to Boysie, who by then had had a look at the freshly written sign, over the top shelf, which read: “NO Credit Today, Come Tomorrow.”

“Boysie, as far as me can see, your account here is fixed at $450.00. It not goin’ to get any higher,” she said as she dug her hands into the two large pockets of her dress and turned her back at him to serve Gwen who had just come in to get her evening’s appetizer at the adult section.

Boysie glanced at the glass in Gwen’s hand, then looked out the window just in time to see a Migo-man delivering a brand new television set at his house.

THE END

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE

Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse – coordinator of the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize, and author of The Boy from Willow Bend and Dancing Nude in the Moonlight. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

Comments Off on Boysie’s Fixed Account by Verdanci Benta

Filed under Wadadli Pen 2005