Tag Archives: 12 and younger

Antigua Experience by Morgan Leah Simon

Honourable Mention – 12 and younger age category

Note: *In keeping with the development goals of Wadadli Pen, all long listed entries are returned to the author with the judge’s note  – both positives and negatives – for revision. Congrats to Morgan. As several of the entries from Christ the King High school explored this theme, we assume it was given as an assignment – we thank the teacher for going the extra mile and applaud the students who tried to break out of the confines of said theme.  Keep working on your craft; keep valuing your voice and your art. – JCH

Here now is Antigua Experience by the Christ the King High School student, who is also a pan player and panorama veteran, in addition to playing piano and violin, who aspire to a career in either music or medicine:

Get to know our Antiguan culture.
Feel the vibe of the steel pan.
Jam to our carnival beats.
Taste the flavor of our national dish Pepper pot & Fungi.

Out of the ashes of the Villa & Point area in Antigua, arose the oldest steel orchestra in the world.
The Hellsgate steel orchestra.
Now you can listen to the wonderful music that moves your feet and stirs your soul.

Come, take a trip to our sunny island during the summer months and enjoy our carnival festivities that always gets everyone in a good mood.
Observe the way our costumes that we wear are handcrafted so cleverly with all the hand sewn sequins and ribbons which put together to give a glorious ensemble .
We dance in these costumes all day and night on carnival Monday and Tuesday.
I can tell you for sure that nobody does carnival like we do.

I have told you about our steel pan music.
I have told you about our carnival, but you haven’t got a good taste of our culture if you have not tried our national dish pepper pot and fungi.
As Antiguans would say pepper pot and fungi
!!!BANG GOOD!!!
But e bang good fi true!
Just thinking about the fungi turning in the pot and the spinach being prepared for cooking has my mouth watering.
That just goes to show you how delicious it is.

Well…..now you know a little bit of our Antiguan culture,
I am sure you will come racing to Antigua to find out more about our culture.

For earning honourable mention in her age category, Morgan received:
A certificate sponsored by the Best of Books
& gifts contributed by Juneth Webson and Frank B. Armstrong.

Thanks to all partners and patrons for making the Wadadli Pen 2016 Challenge possible. Here at Wadadli Pen, we encourage you to support the businesses and individuals who support the arts.

Please respect the writer’s copyright. And while we welcome feedback, please be constructive.

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The Caribbean by Rolanda Cuffy

Honourable Mention in the 12 and younger age category – Wadadli Pen Challenge 2016

Author’s comment: “I have always loved writing.  Certainly it does involve a lot of determination and hard work but when the writing does flow it is deeply satisfying.”

Note: In keeping with the development goals of Wadadli Pen, all long listed entries are returned to the author with the judge’s note  – both positives and negatives – for revision. Congrats to Rolanda, for taking up the challenge of both writing and editing her entry. Keep working on your craft; keep valuing your voice and your art. – JCH

Rolanda Cuffy

Rolanda Cuffy.

 

Here now is The Caribbean by Rolanda Cuffy, a 12-year-old Christ the King High School student who enjoys reading, writing, and dancing:

To a paradise of festival, fun and adventure I went,
Seeking relief from work and stress, a place to vent
There were so many islands to choose from, separated by sea
I hope the one I chose will not disappoint me
The view from the plane already had me pump
Eyes popped wide open; they wanted to jump
Seven days my desires all to fulfill
Scenes I saw gave my soul a thrill
Started off with tourist attractions to know about the land
How amazing it was!  This was a perfect plan
Though the tremendous landscape I saw was great
It was the friendliness of the locals I could not escape
When I dipped my body in the cool, sparkling water
It makes me tinkle all over
Listening to the local music so rhythmically sweet
My body had to move to that beat
Then my tummy became vocal
It wanted to taste nothing but local
Only then I knew how time flew when one is having fun
Cause in a moment of comfort I had to run
Sitting in the plane holding on to the precious memories I had
Leaving the “Land of many Rivers” make me feel real sad
I wonder where my next stop would be
Cause that Island had a hold on me.

For earning honourable mention in her age category, Rolanda received:
Gifts contributed by Juneth Webson & Frank B. Armstrong, and a certificate sponsored by the Best of Books.

Thanks to all partners and patrons for making the Wadadli Pen 2016 Challenge possible. Here at Wadadli Pen, we encourage you to support the businesses and individuals who support the arts.

Please respect the writer’s copyright. And while we welcome feedback, please be constructive.

 

Leave a comment

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A Dinner to Remember by Zion Ebony Williams

2nd runner up in the 12 and younger age category – Wadadli Pen Challenge 2016

About the Story: A grade 5 student, Zion, was given an assignment to write a descriptive story about a Christmas dinner. This is the story she wrote. 

Judge’s comments (positives only*): “Time, mood and anticipation are established early and continued through nicely. A celebration of ‘family’ through  the eyes of a child… (who) can still see the ‘Christmas’ period through family gathering and having fun and not as the obscene behemoth it has become.”

Note: *While only the positives are being shared with the public, in keeping with the development goals of Wadadli Pen, all long listed entries are returned to the author with the judge’s note  – both positives and negatives – for revision. Congrats to Zion, a 2014 finalist, on her return to the winners’ circle. Keep working on your craft; keep valuing your voice and your art. – JCH

Zion

Zion Ebony Williams.

Here now is A Dinner to Remember by Zion Ebony Williams, a 10-year-old student of Baptist Academy, who loves liturgical dancing, singing, and watching her favourite TV shows; whose involvement in public speaking at school is helping her break out of her shyness; and whose The Night I went to Cricket , in addition to being a 2014 honourable mention, was also included in the special Antigua and Barbuda edition of Tongues of the Ocean:

“Mmmmm! The wonderful  blended aroma  of baked turkey, macaroni pie and stewed pork filled the air. I quickly jumped out of bed. It was Boxing Day. The day of the family Christmas dinner at my grandmother’s house. Each family was required to bring something for the meal, so mom prepared the turkey, macaroni pie and stewed pork.

“Yummm!” I was feeling hungry already , just thinking about all the delicious food  that would be there. I could hardly wait for the afternoon, when the dinner was to begin.

The afternoon finally came, and we arrived at my grandmother’s house. Mommy asked me to take the stewed pork inside.

“Be careful, Zion! Are you sure you can manage that?” she asked.

“Of course, Mommy! This is nothing for me” I bragged, walking slowly towards the house.

Suddenly, I tripped over the sleeping  black and white striped cat.

“Bap!” I fell flat on my face.

The stewed pork  flew all over the place. My arms, knees,  and pride were badly bruised. I was so embarrassed. Luckily I didn’t break any bones. Then again, maybe I was not so lucky after all, because if I had a broken hand, then I would have to be taken to hospital, and every one would be fussing about me and feeling sorry for me, and no one would remember  I had spilled the stewed pork, and I would not have felt so ashamed to face the rest of the family. It did not help that my cousins were all l laughing at me. “Yes… I think I would have preferred breaking a bone” I thought to myself.

My sore pride was soon soothed when we started  dinner.

Ooooh!  so much food and they all looked so delicious!  The cat with her fur all slicked down with pork stew, would not stop licking herself.  “Well, she certainly thought  it was delicious!

I tasted a little of everything, but filled my plate up with my favorites. Broccoli covered with melted cheese, baked barbecue chicken, macaroni pie, ham and a refreshing glass of fruit punch . Of course, I had to have ice cream and cake, and I could not resist the chocolate covered marsh-mellows. Afterwards,  I was so full, I felt my belly would burst.
The best part of the dinner was the old time funny stories that my uncles, aunts and grandmother told.  They had me laughing until I cried, especially the one about the time when my mom urinated on herself running in fear from the “John Bull”. Oh! I would have loved to see that! I  teased mom  about this for a long time after, because she always made me think she was never afraid of anything.  Ha! ha! Her secret was out!

I soon forgot about my pain, but I would never forget that Christmas dinner. The scar on my knees would always make it a dinner to remember.

For earning 2nd runner up in her age category, Zion received:
 A certificate sponsored by the Best of Books
EC$125 – Caribbean Reads Publishing
EC$30 gift certificates for books – Cushion Club
Gift – Frank B. Armstrong
Inner City Girl by Colleen Smith-Dennis – Pam Arthurton of Carib World Travel
The Legend of Bat’s Cave and Other Stories by Barbara Arrindell – The Best of Books

Thanks to all partners and patrons for making the Wadadli Pen 2016 Challenge possible. Here at Wadadli Pen, we encourage you to support the businesses and individuals who support the arts.

Please respect the writer’s copyright. And while we welcome feedback, please be constructive.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Links We Love, Literary Gallery, Wadadli Pen 2016, Wadadli Pen News

My Worst Day Ever by Judah Christian

2nd placed/1st runner up in the 12 and younger age category – Wadadli Pen Challenge 2016

Author’s comment about the story: “My Worst Day Ever shows how a student’s day moves from a bright sunny day, to one filled with mishaps.”

Judge’s comments (positives only*): “Very concise, well formed, and detailed …bold (vocabulary)… Most Caribbean school children can probably relate to this story…Somehow, it made me think of the pressure on children- from an early age – to pass an exam.”

Note: *While only the positives are being shared with the public, in keeping with the development goals of Wadadli Pen, all long listed entries are returned to the author with the judge’s note – both positives and negatives – for revision. Congrats to Judah for being so close to the main prize. Keep working on your craft; keep valuing your voice and your art. – JCH

Judah Christian

Judah Christian.

 

Here now is My Worst Day Ever by Judah Christian, a Best of Books Promising Writer selection in Wadadli Pen’s 2015 Flash Fiction Challenge, a grade 4 Sunnyside Tutorial student, who enjoys football and basketball and dreams of becoming either a mathematician or professional football player:

 

The day started out with the sun shining brightly. I ate some of my favourite cornflakes, Honey Nut Cheerios, and got ready for school. When I got to the classroom, early as usual, I put my homework on Ms. Mention’s table.

I went back to my desk and studied for my Mathematics test. It was the first test of the day. It was so short and easy that I was sure that I had passed with an A+. To my horror, when teacher returned the papers just before lunch, I got a really low mark, a B-. I started questioning myself about how I got such a low grade. I was both shocked and disappointed. What was I going to tell my mother?

The bell rang so loudly that it surprised me. I opened my lunch bag, and forgot all about the test when I saw the bacon cheeseburger that I had made for the first time. As I was about to take my first bite, Ronald the Wild Indian slapped it out of my hand. I felt angry and sad at the same time. It had looked so delicious, now it was vitiated- just like my math grade.

Ronald was just too wild.

When my mother came for me at the end of the day, I showed her the test paper. She gave me an austere look and then berated me saying:

“How come you get such a low grade pan you Maths tess?”

“I really studied hard, Mom.” I answered quickly, but quietly.

“You know wah, when you go home, don’t even touch me TV!” ordered my mother.

To think that I was planning to watch the Phineas and Ferb marathon.

This is definitely my worst day ever!

For earning second place/1st runner up in his age category, Judah received:
 EC$175 sponsored by CaribbeanReads Publishing, an EC$35 gift certificates for books sponsored by the Cushion Club, Burt Award winning title All Over Again by A-dZiko Gelege sponsored by CODE, gifts from Frank B. Armstrong, and a game, book, and certificate sponsored by the Best of Books.

Thanks to all partners and patrons for making the Wadadli Pen 2016 Challenge possible. Here at Wadadli Pen, we encourage you to support the businesses and individuals who support the arts.

Please respect the writer’s copyright. And while we welcome feedback, please be constructive.

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Links We Love, Wadadli Pen 2016, Wadadli Pen News

The Legend of The Sea Lords by Vega Armstrong

Long ago on a small island in the Caribbean a young girl named Freya went on a sailing trip with her friends. The sea was calm at first, but as they got further out to sea the rougher the waves got and soon there was a horrible storm. The girls were terrified! The storm blew them to a mysterious island, the likes of which they had never seen before! It was absolutely beautiful! It was a fairly mountainous place, with dozens of waterfalls.

“Are we on Dominica?” Freya asked nervously.

“Nope,” replied one of her friends named Leila who had been to Dominica before.

“We’ll be fine!” Jane assured her friends.

Freya wasn’t so sure about that. The girls decided to explore the island. Further inland they found a waterfall with a large plunge pool. Close by the plunge pool they found a cave.

“Let’s sleep here!” Leila suggested. Again Freya wasn’t so sure that that was such a good idea.

“What if there are bats?” Jane moaned. Typical Jane, Freya thought, always moaning but this time Freya sort of agreed… Well maybe not the whole ‘what if there are bats?’ part but Freya wasn’t sure she wanted to go into the cave far less sleep in it! There was just something she didn’t like about it.

“She has a point!” said Freya finally.

“Fine! But where do you suppose we are going to sleep?” Leila asked with crossed arms.

“I don’t know!”replied Jane “but just not there,” she said pointing at the cave.

“I know! Why don’t we go for a swim in the plunge pool,” Freya suggested eager to change the subject. Jane and Leila both agreed that this was a good idea, so the three girls jumped into the pool. It was fresh water so the girls opened their eyes. Freya saw something strange; it was in the deeper end of the pool so she signalled to the others to surface.

“What’s wrong?” asked Leila

“I saw something,” Freya muttered lost in thoughts.

“What?” Jane prodded.

No answer from Freya.

“Let me try,” Leila told Jane. “Can you at least show us what you saw?”Leila asked Freya.

Still no answer from Freya. Leila sighed. Suddenly Freya dove under the water, the others quickly followed her. When they caught up with her they too saw the mysterious creature. This time it saw the three girls. Leila signalled to Jane and Freya to re-surface.

“What is that?”

“Whatever it is it was weird!” suddenly the strange creature surfaced the girls were amazed. It looked like an octopus but it transformed into a little girl with pale skin and white-blonde hair.

“I’m not an it or a that I’m a sea lord and I am certainly not weird!”

“You talk?” Jane asked astonished

“Yes of course I talk!” replied the sea lord “my name is Mako. You must help us to escape this pool. You see that cave on the shore has in evil powers soon they will grow so strong that the whole island will explode! And you mortals can help us to escape to the ocean. Now Freya realized why she didn’t like the cave.

“How can we help you and how long do we have?” asked Freya.

“To the summer solstice, that is when the cave will be its strongest.”

“But that’s ……”

“Tomorrow, yes and you can help by getting the rock that is purple, not far into the woods.

“But that’s not very far from here in the pool. “

“Yes but if sea lords get out of the water they die and turn to dust.”

“Well….” Freya said hesitantly. She looked back at her friends, they both nodded as if to say Mako was to be trusted.

“Ok then,” Freya said. “But we have to hurry, time is running out.” Jane, Leila and Mako all cheered. Freya and her friends got out of the water and headed towards the woods. The three girls went separate ways as to find the purple rock faster. It was Leila that found the rock; she was admiring the magnificent stone when a ghostly being started to stroke her hair. The fingers were that of an old man, long and bony.

“Come with us and you may keep the rock,” said the strange man in a hoarse voice. Leila was terrified, but she stood her ground. “Don’t you love it on this island?”

“No,” she said firmly “I want to go home.” She burst into tears, her friends heard her and came running, the ghostly man vanished into the trees. The girls congratulated Leila and they hurried back to the pool.

Leila asked Mako about the ghostly man that she saw in the woods

“This is bad, very bad,” Mako said worriedly, “You see the man that you saw was a Cumba. The most evil of all spirits. They live in the cave by the water’s edge. The reason that he wanted the purple stone was so that we could not escape. Anyways now, Leila, please place the purple rock against that wall over there then when a hole appears you must swim through it until you reach the ocean, do you understand?”All the girls nodded. Leila submerged and placed the rock against the wall as she was told to. Suddenly a large opening appeared in the wall, all of the sea lords and all of the girls swam to freedom.

“Thank you so much for helping us!” Mako said “if you want anything, you can have it!”

“Well,” said Jane “I have been wanting this really nice pair of earrings for a while ooh and also this really nice pair of shoes and….”

“Stop that Jane!” said Freya in an annoyed tone “Mako, what we would really like is to go back to our homes in Guadeloupe.”

“Is that all?”

“Yes,”

“Very well, sea lords let us return them to Guadeloupe.”

So the sea lords swam with them on their backs and they returned home and everyone was happy.

AUTHOR BIO: 10 yr old Vega Armstrong is a 5th grade student at St. Nicholas primary school. Her teacher Ms. Nicholas has on many occasions commented how wonderful her essays and short stories are written. Vega loves to read and is very creative, and recently illustrated a children book called The Christmas Log. Her Wadadli Pen Challenge 2012 entry, Legend of the Sea Lords takes you on a journey with Freya, Jane and Leila who get caught in a storm at sea. The three young girls find themselves washed up on a mysterious island. When bathing in a plunge pool Freya discovers a strange creature…

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE
Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

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The Adventures of Mr. Coconut by Akeile Benjamin

Once upon a time there was a large coconut tree which grew high on top of a hill in the rainforest.  There on that tree was a bunch of the juiciest coconuts you ever saw.  On a very hot day in the middle of the summer the coconuts started falling.  Among the bunch of coconuts that fell, there was one special nut, who felt he was meant for greatness.

The day he fell from the tree he set out on a mission to find his destiny.  He rolled down the hill and met many creatures, like a frog named Hermey.  Hermey asked, “Hey, what’s your name?”  He said, “My name is Mr. Coconut.”  They both became friends.

Mr. Coconut then met a bird named Twitch.  She was looking for some worms for her babies.  When Mr. Coconut rolled in a dirt patch some worms appeared so she picked them up with her sharp beak and put them in her nest.  She thanked Mr. Coconut and they became friends as well.

As Mr. Coconut continued his journey he soon reached the sea.  He heard someone crying, “help! help!”  so he went and found a crab stuck under a rock.  Mr. Coconut rolled away the rock and set the crab free.  The crab thanked Mr. Coconut and they became friends.  When Mr. Coconut reached the sea, he started to sing his song, “Mr. Coconut Look Out here He Comes. Mr. Coconut Look Out here He Comes.”

He went home and told all the other coconuts about this great adventure.  When night came he went back into his tree and there he lived happily ever after.

AUTHOR BIO: Second Placed Writer in the 12 and Younger age category of Wadadli Pen 2012 is a Fifth Grade Student at the Wesleyan Junior Academy. The illustrations accompanying what the chief judge described as “a nice, simple story” were provided by the school.

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE
Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

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Origin by Naleka Beckford

Kieshana was very disappointed when she heard the news that they were moving back to Antigua.  Not that Antigua wasn’t a wonderful magnificent island, the reason was because back in the fourth grade they’d started learning about slavery and when everybody heard about all the horrible things that slave masters did, they grew very racist to Kieshana.  Soon everyone started to hate her.  Although Kieshana wasn’t white she was mixed, it made matters even worse.  When they heard the things white people did, they started to pick fights with her.  Every time she said to leave her alone, they would reply, “or what, you whip us to death?”

Remembering the horrible event made her even more mad.  Too bad, she had no choice because her father, Mr. Philips, was a successful business man until he fell into bankruptcy and lost all his money.  Their only choice was to live with his sister Megan in Antigua.  Soon they felt the cool atmosphere and came to a nice warm tropical climate.  After three months Kieshana went back to her old school and Mr. T. Philips got a job as a bank teller in the town.  Kieshana was soon in her old red, blue and white uniform.  After a week she could tell that the people still hated her for her origin.  She actually thought that they would put it behind them after two years.

Nobody wanted to be friends with her, and she was lonely and outnumbered by twenty nine students which were like the whole class.

A couple weeks passed and everyone forgot about the past and became less hostile until they started to review slavery.  It started all over again, all of her friends left because they were too scared to stand up to the ring leader, Jay.  The thing was that if she brought it to the teachers (who also hated her, except for Mr. Courts) they blamed her and she would get detention.  If that happened she would be in a lot of trouble with her parents who were always pressuring her about the upcoming Common Entrance Examinations.

The only reason the teachers hated her was because Jay was the grandson of Mrs. Walton the meanest teacher whom everyone was scared of. In class, Mr. Courts said they had to write about their origin, the majority of the class glared at Kieshana (as if it meant something).  It was very hard for Kieshana to find something good about her origin without offending Jay, because everything about whites would be offending. (What will she say my origin is white and we like to beat blacks?)  Kieshana almost forgot that she was black from her mother’s side so she wrote on that.

After everyone wrote and read their pieces, the teacher left the room.  Jay and twenty nine students hovered around her desk.  “How can you lie? You are nothing like us.” “How dare you insult me.” “I am mixed you know.” said Kieshana.  “The only thing I see mixed are your hazel eyes,” snorted Jay.  Kieshana gathered all of her confidence. “You’re just insulting yourself and being a racist. You do know that we’re apart of slavery, and, if anything, you’re the true slave master, pushing people around with your power,” she said in a loud confident voice.  The twenty nine children started to consider.  Soon they went over to Kieshana.  “What are you doing, are you going to let some white girl boss you around?” Jay shouted.

One of the boys answered, “We made that decision, and we weren’t forced.”  “Get back here,” Jay screamed.  “Or what?” a girl snorted as they all went back to their seats leaving Jay stunned.

Later that day Jay realized his actions and apologized to everyone.  After a week everyone finally forgave him including Kieshana.

A white girl named Anlea, started the school later that year.  No one was hostile to her.  She even had a lot of friends including Jay.  So in the end the school was once again in harmony and nobody hated each other for their origin.

AUTHOR BIO:  Naleka Beckford, 11, is a Grade Six student at Antigua Wesleyan Junior Academy. Her story, Origin,  which the chief judge said “covers some serious topics in a simplified way”, earned her third place in the 12 and Younger age category of the Wadadli Pen 2012 Challenge.

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION & TERMS OF USE
Copyright of the winning Wadadli Pen stories and/or art work featured on this site belongs to the creators of the individual works and are used here purely for promotional and educational purposes. Other blog content, except otherwise noted, is created and/or maintained by Joanne C. Hillhouse. Site content should not be copied, distributed, transmitted, used for commercial purposes, altered, transformed, or built upon without the consent of the copyright holders.

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