Tag Archives: artists

Wadadli Pen Returns After A Year Hiatus With A Bigger Challenge

New sub-themes include Imagine a Future – an opportunity for a writer to create a climate change themed dystopia or futopia depending on which way the creative winds blow; the Wa’omani Prize exclusively for Barbudans; and a comic-strip art challenge. The age categories have also been re-set to 6 and younger, 7 to 12, 13 to 17, and 18 to 35. Launch announcement in this press release (WADADLI PEN LAUNCH RELEASE 2020). A submission form (2020 WADADLI YOUTH PEN PRIZE SUBMISSION FORM) is required. Full submission guidelines at Wadadli Pen 2020.

This photo shows 2006 Wadadli Pen finalists includes Verdanci Benta, Rosalie Richards, Blair Rose, prolific self-published author Rilys Adams, and former independent online newspaper publisher and editor Angelica O’Donoghue.

Wadadli Pen continues to create opportunities for writers and artists in Antigua and Barbuda, nurturing and showcasing the arts since 2004.

To contribute prizes so that we can reward all this effort, contact us at wadadlipen@gmail.com

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure/Perdida! Una Aventura en el Mar Caribe, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Arts in the News (Unfortunately)

Usually we’re happy here at Wadadli Pen about arts and the youth being in the news and try to keep you updated. Sometimes, not so much.

First up is this back and forth between Antigua and Barbuda’s Prime Minister and a member of the calypso fraternity in response to criticism (or questioning?) of cultural ambassador designation being given to the British-based Kanneh-Masons (Antigua-descended family of classical musicians). The Kanneh-Masons are dope. Their Playing to Inspire series of concerts to raise funds for the national youth symphony orchestra (I believe) is a worthy pursuit and one of them has distinguished himself internationally as a soloist, notably performing at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. No shade against them AT ALL. That said, these appointments can seem arbitrary and questioning how these things are decided is fair (and forwards transparency).  It’s inevitable for some to wonder why some people get to be at the front of the line, (AGAIN) without any shade on them, and why some we would consider worthy artists who work and sometimes die overlooked despite accomplishments locally, regionally, and globally stay at the back. Disappointing then that, instead of engaging on that level, the conversation (as reported) seemingly descended into broadsides against Antigua and Barbuda’s calypso artistes because their lyrics are perceived as being too local (you can read the articles for yourself above – click on them to get a full sized view). I have personally found in the calypso I grew up listening to, including the music of the artistes both sides seem to agree represent the best of us, that the local/the specific can connect to the universal thematically and emotionally (especially if the music sweet – not necessarily always jumpy but melodic and soul touching in some way) without diluting itself and thus losing both its poetry and its potency. There are lots of reasons why something might be underdeveloped (and some of our arts is) and reasons why it might not travel that do not necessarily have anything to do with the lyrics or narrative – among those reasons, opportunity.

pledge

This one is not unfortunate per se, correcting the record – as Pledge writer Stanley Humphreys and singer Short Shirt did with these letters to the editor in response to an article (not the first one I might add from personal experience) crediting someone else with writing this particular song (I can think of a book with a similar claim and another book that actually went a long way in correcting the record on a whole lot of songs) – is always a good thing. The credit is correct in our song lyrics data base by the way though the past confusion is addressed in the actual Pledge link (above). I do wish to take this opportunity to underscore that one of the challenges for those seeking to get the record right is the sparseness of documented information – one of the ways to fix this is through comprehensive liner notes, the kind often lacking from local music CDs. Some liner notes include not only production credits but song lyrics. As someone who has long covered the local art scene and who has for several years on this site worked to build a data base of our songwriters and their songs for some time, it’s easy to get things wrong due to lack of available, accurate information (oftentimes, even when you ask).

huh

Okay, this one isn’t related to the arts but it is related to the youth which is the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize constituency. I don’t want to get too deep into this one – it’s too easy for the message to be missed for reasons that have nothing to do with the message itself – but I am disappointed not only with the delay in turning this facility over to the youth of the Grays Green (and I would add Ottos community and beyond) but that the optics for me say, the youth can wait, which is not a good look. The work of the Magistrate’s Court is important but I wish we had gone with an alternate site on this one, and proceeded with opening this facility post haste with all the fan fair our youth deserve. I can’t help feeling that whenever they get it now, it won’t be the same.

Let’s end on an upbeat note. I haven’t seen this in the paper – doesn’t mean it wasn’t there as admittedly I am a few days behind on the papers – or on my social media (apart from posts by individual winners) but it is one of my favourite events (celebrating our youth); I always take the time to make nominations (not just in lit arts) and I like to share the outcome here on the blog (click here to see who won what this year). Shout out to lit awards winner and Wadadli Pen 2018 Challenge winner Kyle Christian and to Latisha Browne of the Cushion Club (pictured below with her award).

latisha.jpg

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Payment Chronicles

My latest addition to the Resources page on this blog will be about freelance rates. Some of you will know that I am a freelancing artist so this issue is personal to me but so are many of the issues on the Resources page not personal in an in my feelings way, but in that they deal with issues I’ve stumbled across in my time as a writer, as a freelancer, as an author seeking to get published, as someone on the hustle, as a published author.  I just wanted to use this posting as a reminder to you that that page exists (I add links to it as I can) and to do the following PSA (speaking as an independent artist and freelancer).

Artist_Work_For_Free_CloseUp

We need to be paid.

We need to be paid on time.

Not being paid for any use of our time affects our ability to pay our bills.

Not being paid on time for any use of our time affects our ability to pay our bills and sets us back in unpredictable ways (yes, even when you allow yourself a financial cushion which you should try to put in place when money is flowing and hope it doesn’t empty out before things unblock).

We all have bills to pay, not just people with 9-5s.

Unlike people with 9-5s, our next cheque is not guaranteed.

Think about this the next and every time you ask an independent artist and/or freelancer to do something.

Yes, this includes brain picking.

Think about it before you approach them.

Keep thinking about it until they are compensated. Every freelancer and many artists (I won’t say all because some are not working independently) have had issues with payment and/or timely payment. It affects your ability to sustain yourself and retain whatever goodwill you’ve built up.

Stop acting like a grown adult who needs to be paid for their services doesn’t care about their community; many have the receipts of community involvement to show, but the banks and the APUA don’t care about that.

So, pay and pay on time.

Just be fair.

This, of course, does not negate and/or preclude trade exchanges, community service, mentoring, or favours where one is able to do any of the above but these cannot be the default options. Do not…stop…do not say the word “exposure”. I told you not to say that word. Yes, doing it for exposure is a thing, but it’s not the only thing and after a time it’s not enough.

Pay artists.

This PSA is not directed at anyone in particular (though I have my share of stories) but the new link on the Resources page prompted some reflections on this vexing issue. And it is a vexing issue.

The post though is not about not getting paid but the not unrelated issue of rates. I thought it a necessary share because of complaints I sometimes see related to rates and the posting of rates. I’ll excerpt it but it’s worth reading the whole thing.

‘Rates change per industry, company, writer, location and project (and many other variables) …When asked the question “How do you charge?”, freelancers overwhelmingly responded that “it’s a mix – it depends on the client.” In fact, nearly 60% of respondents vary their rates based on different clients, while 12% charge per hour, another 12% by word, and nearly 16% charge by retainer (or per project). This is good news for brands, as budgets and payment terms vary from business to business.”’

I myself have to consider the particulars of each project and estimate (based on my experience of past projects, what this particular project needs, my best guesstimate of how much time it will take to serve the project and the client fairly and thoroughly, what is the value of that time and/or the value of the time lost, what value I bring to it, industry standards v. what the market can practically allow, client size vis-a-vis individual budgets, and other variables). It sucks when after all of that and bending over backwards to deliver, you’re once again feeling around in the dark re pay. It ripples in to your ability to keep up with your obligations or even get ahead of them. So that was the trigger and the connection.

The link will be on the resources page and I encourage you to check that out because feeling around in the dark can be a lonely thing. I’ve learned some things in hard and soft ways, in some ways I’m still learning, and in more ways than I’d like I’m still feeling around in the dark, but I try to light a candle for someone else when I can (consider it part of my service to my community…if you want…either way I’m doing it).

But here’s the link, directly, as well.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen, my books, and my freelance writing-editing-coaching-workshop services. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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A Mammoth Picture Post – *You Have Been Warned

The awards ceremony for the 2014 Wadadli Pen Challenge was on Sunday 30th March; here finally are the pictures with thanks to Glen Toussaint of the Best of Books bookstore, St. Mary’s Street, Antigua. – usually I’d say respect copyright and don’t use the pictures but I’ll break with form and say share by all means, as an encouragement for the young writers and artists; and a thank you to all the patrons and partners. Speaking of patrons, the full list of who got what from among the contributed prizes can be found here. Follow the links to read the stories or see the art work.

Cake designed and made by Danielle George-John of Sweet Dreams.

Cake designed and made by Danielle George-John of Sweet Dreams.

Danielle presenting the cake.

Danielle presenting the cake.

The photo call: (front row, from left) Joanne C. Hillhouse - Wadadli Pen coordinator, Emile Hill - second placed in the art challenge, Daryl George - 18 to 35 honourable mention, Daniel Ince - 12 and younger honourable mention, Christopher Gittens and Mjonir Messiah - tied for third place in the 12 and younger category, and Vega Armstrong - winner 12 and younger. Back row from left - special guest, donor and Wadadli Pen co-founder D. Gisele Isaac, Zahra Emanuel - 3rd placed 13 to 17, Paula Russell-Peters - 2nd and 3rd placed for the Lead by Example Teachers' Prize, and Margaret Irish - winner of the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

The photo call: (front row, from left) Joanne C. Hillhouse – Wadadli Pen coordinator, Emile Hill – second placed in the art challenge, Daryl George – 18 to 35 honourable mention, Daniel Ince – 12 and younger honourable mention, Christopher Gittens and Mjonir Messiah – tied for third place in the 12 and younger category, and Vega Armstrong – winner 12 and younger. Back row from left – special guest, donor and Wadadli Pen co-founder D. Gisele Isaac, Zahra Emanuel – 3rd placed 13 to 17, Paula Russell-Peters – 2nd and 3rd placed for the Lead by Example Teachers’ Prize, and Margaret Irish – winner of the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

...okay so picking up where the first image left off, that's Zion Williams next to Vega, and Chammaiah Ambrose next to her, and behind them, that's Zoe Lewis - they're all 12 and younger finalists - and behind her that's second placed writer overall and winner of the 18 to 35 category Kohylah Piper.

…okay so picking up where the first image left off, that’s Zion Williams next to Vega, and Chammaiah Ambrose next to her, and behind them, that’s Zoe Lewis – they’re all 12 and younger finalists – and behind her that’s second placed writer overall and winner of the 18 to 35 category Kohylah Piper.

Art winner Alvin Livingstone collects his prizes from D. Gisele Isaac. That image on top is an original Edison Liburd and was contributed by Art at the Ridge.

Art winner Alvin Livingstone, who did cover art for the Last Cry, collects his prizes from D. Gisele Isaac. That image on top is an original Edison Liburd and was contributed by Art at the Ridge.

Emile Hill collects his second placed art prize.

Emile Hill collects his second placed art prize.

with Shem Alexander - 2010 art winner and 2014 art honourable mention.

with Shem Alexander – 2010 art winner and 2014 art honourable mention.

Gisele presents to second placed writer 13 to 17 Kelvin Juwon Miller.

Gisele presents to second placed writer 13 to 17 Kelvin Juwon Miller.

Barbara presents to Paula Russell Peters, a T N Kirnon teacher who won both the second and third placed in the Lead by Example Teachers Prize. Her school also won a prize for having the most submissions.

Barbara Arrindell of the Best of Books bookstore presents to Paula Russell Peters, a T N Kirnon teacher who won both the second and third placed in the Lead by Example Teachers Prize. Her school also won a prize for having the most submissions.

Barbara Arrindell of the Best of Books presents to Damian De Silva, an honourable mention for the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

Barbara Arrindell of the Best of Books presents to Damian De Silva, an honourable mention for the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

Carmen Ambrose, mother of one of the 12 and younger wins, and an honourable mention in her own right for the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

Carmen Ambrose, mother of one of the 12 and younger wins, and an honourable mention in her own right for the Lead by Example Teachers Prize.

Margaret Irish - winner of the Lead by Example Teachers Prize collects her gifts courtesy Caribbean Reads Publishing and plaque sponsored by Joy Lawrence.

Margaret Irish – winner of the Lead by Example Teachers Prize collects her gifts courtesy Caribbean Reads Publishing and plaque sponsored by Joy Lawrence.

Liscia Lawrence, a two time past finalist and honourable mention in the 18 to 35 age category. 18 to 35...wow...she was 15 or 16 the first time she participated in Wadadli Pen.

Liscia Lawrence, a two time past finalist and honourable mention in the 18 to 35 age category. 18 to 35…wow…she was 15 or 16 the first time she participated in Wadadli Pen.

Daryl George was honourable mention in 2012, second overall in 2013, and is honourable mention this year in the 18 to 35 age category.

Daryl George was honourable mention in 2012, second overall in 2013, and is honourable mention this year in the 18 to 35 age category.

Alexandra Spence collects from the Cushion Club rep; she was an honourable mention in the 18 to 35 age category.

Alexandra Spence collects from the Cushion Club rep; she was an honourable mention in the 18 to 35 age category.

 

Letisha Carrington Faracho - another honourable mention 18 to 35.

Letisha Carrington Faracho – another honourable mention 18 to 35.

Arize Lee - 3rd placed in the 18 to 35 age category.

Arize Lee – 3rd placed in the 18 to 35 age category.

Kohlyah Piper collects her prizes - she was best writer 18 to 35 and second best overall.

Kohlyah Piper collects her prizes – she was best writer 18 to 35 and second best overall.

A finalist in 2012 and 2013, Vega Armstrong was the best writer in the 12 and younger category in 2014. She collects from D. Gisele Isaac.

A finalist in 2012 and 2013, Vega Armstrong was the best writer in the 12 and younger category in 2014. She collects from D. Gisele Isaac.

Mjolnir Messiah tied for third; he collects.

Mjolnir Messiah tied for third; he collects.

Zion Williams, 12 and younger honourable mention collects.

Zion Williams, 12 and younger honourable mention collects.

Christopher Gittens who also tied for third in the 12 and younger category.

Christopher Gittens who tied for third place in the 12 and younger category.

Chammaiah

Chammaiah Ambrose, second placed writer, 12 and younger, collects her prize.

Daniel Ince was an honourable mention - 12 and younger.

Daniel Ince was an honourable mention – 12 and younger.

Zoe Lewis accepts her prizes as a 12 and younger honourable mention.

Zoe Lewis accepts her prizes as a 12 and younger honourable mention.

Zahra Emanuel placed 3rdin the 13 to 17 age category; and collects.

Zahra Emanuel placed 3rdin the 13 to 17 age category; and collects.

Just a couple more…these were on facebook even before the event was over courtesy Eef Armstrong, mother of 12 and younger winner Vega and one of our 2013 and 2014 donors via her company Raw Island Products:

Vega collects from Gisele.

Vega collects from Gisele.

A cross section of the winners.

A cross section of the winners.

some of the winners 4 by eef

Because it's so sweet, behold The Cake.

Because it’s so sweet, behold The Cake.

Me with Vega.

Me with Vega.

One more, this one from Zoe’s mom by special request:

Zoe and me by request of her mom; with thanks to her mom for sharing.

Zoe and me by request of her mom; with thanks to her mom for sharing.

Finally, four tokens were contributed by Photogenesis for the specific purpose of presenting them to four of the longest serving Wadadli Pen volunteers – three (Barbara Arrindell, Alstyne Allen, and D. Gisele Isaac) were at the programme and received theirs; the other (Brenda Lee Browne) is off island and will receive hers at a later date. I wish I had one for all the volunteers through the years or the partners as I’ve come to think of them because they all help me do the heavy lifting, and I thank them for that… I also wish I had one of these to keep because aren’t they pretty: token

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Coming soon

For artists and writers 35 and younger in Antigua and Barbuda, and teachers of all ages…

2014 Wadadli Pen flyer

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Window Closing

Artists, we want you…

The judges are currently evaluating the literary submissions to the Best of Books Wadadli Pen 2011 Challenge…in fact, the short list is in and soon story samples will be going out to registered artists for illustrations. This means that if you wish to be among the illutrators of these pieces of children’s fiction by Antiguan and Barbudan writers, if you are yourself from A & B and 35 years or younger, you need to register now. The Window is C.L.O.S.I.N.G

If you’re an artist who’s been on the fence, time to jump; get your name, email, age, and location in NOW to wadadlipen@yahoo.com before Time Runs Out.

Once you’ve registered, you will shortly receive story samples and artist guidelines…winning artists and writers will be awarded in June at the Best of Books Outdoor Book and Story Fair. The top entries will be posted here and elsewhere.

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FYI – Wadadli Pen update

Be advised that the judging round of the Best of Books Wadadli Pen Challenge 2011 has begun. This year’s judges are Dotsie Isaac Gellizeau, an Antiguan and Barbudan poet who made her name on the local open mic circuit before releasing her spoken word CD Absoulutely Dotsie and going to have her work featured in different fora such as the presentation of Wednesday’s Child during the 2010 production of When A Woman Moans, and Brenda Lee Browne, writer and former coordinator of the A & B Independence Literary Arts competition who has mentored many young writers. The roughly 40 submitted pieces will be shortlisted and the top three in each age category returned to the writers for editing and resubmission before the final ranking per age category (12 and under, 13 to 17, 18 to 35) and for overall winner is done. The winning pieces will be posted on the Wadadli Pen website and possibly elsewhere.

Winning pieces must be in the genre of children’s literature, must be creative and interesting, and in the spirit of the Caribbean. We continue to look for writing that engages.

Registrations have started to come in, meanwhile, from artist (35 and younger) interested in creating illustrations for the top stories. Interested artists can continue to submit their names until the first round of judging is completed later this month. Extracts will then go out for visual interpretation along with guidelines from art teacher Renee Philip, also organizer of St. Anthony’s Sidewalk Art Festival. If you like to draw, we invite you to submit your name, age, gender, location and contact information to wadadlipen@yahoo.com

As founder/coordinator of the competition, I am still in the process of soliciting sponsorship as all winning writers and artists will be awarded prizes. Thanks so much to the sponsors who are already on board.

Winners will be awarded during the planned June anniversary street book fair.

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