Tag Archives: book meme

Sample Saturday: Away From Home

This post is inspired by Booker Talk’s Sample Saturday: Around the World Post. I thought I’d do it while waiting for my computer to do things. Flipping it to books written by Antiguans and Barbudans (citizens and/or residents) set Away from Home (i.e. not set in Antigua and Barbuda). Fiction, obviously. I’m sure I can find three. Fingers crossed.

London Rocks by Brenda Lee Browne – This is the story of Dante Brookes, a young man growing up in London in the late seventies and early eighties when sound systems ruled the party scene for young, Black British youth of Caribbean heritage. He navigates the loss of friends, police harassment and being a teenage father while forging a career as an MC. Dante stumbles into the acting profession and also becomes a writer. It is through these disparate experiences that he learns that the pen and mic at mightier than the sword.

I do think this is one of those books that should have gotten more notice than it did. I explained why in my review.

Verdict: Definitely check it out.

Considering Venus by D. Gisele Isaac – This explores the almost-unacknowledged issue of lesbianism among Caribbean women and adds to it the complication of a heterosexual perspective.  It asks, “What happens when girlfriends becomes more than friends?”

Though the characters visit Antigua, the book, if I’m remembering correctly, is primarily set in the US (the Northeast US, I believe) where the author was resident at the time.

Verdict: Breaking taboos way ahead of the curve (it came out in the late 1990s); a timely classic. Get it.

Unburnable by Marie Elena John – Haunted by scandal and secrets, Lillian Baptiste fled Dominica when she was fourteen after discovering she was the daughter of Iris, the half-crazy woman whose life was told of in chanté mas songs sung during Carnival—songs about a village on a mountaintop littered with secrets, masquerades that supposedly fly and wreak havoc, and a man who suddenly and mysteriously dropped dead. After twenty years away, Lillian returns to her native island to face the demons of her past.

Of course, there are a fair number of Antiguans who will say Dominica (the French/English Caribbean republic – not the Spanish country that takes up half of Hispaniola) doesn’t count, so intertwined are our families, but it is technically Away.

Verdict: A Hurston Wright Legacy Award nominee and a really good read spanning generations.

That’s my three. I started scrolling through the Antigua and Barbuda Fiction List and hit three books I’d read and liked that were set Away before even getting to Jamaica Kincaid (take your pick, Lucy – NY or See Now Then – Vermont), or having to pull the books with only a few scenes Away (like my own Dancing Nude in the Moonlight – Dominican Republic), or hit the children’s book (Rachel Collis’ Emerald Isle of Adventure says it’s set in Montserrat right there in the title).

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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F is for Friday

Trying out Nomadic World’s F is for Friday meme for the first time.

To participate, apparently, I need to do the following.

F – Feature your latest book obsession (it doesn’t have to be your current read)
I – Indicate which book/s you are looking forward to reading this weekend.
F – Favorite quote of the week/day
F – Five things you’re happy or grateful for this week.

Here goes.

F – Feature your latest book obsession (it doesn’t have to be your current read)

Today while waiting for the bus I read all of Lawrence Jardine’s contribution to the 2018 Antigua and Barbuda Review of Books – Wanted: Offspring, Talent, Inheritance and Assets Management – and I found myself engaging with it and wishing to share it here. So, I’m going to reach out to the author for permission to … share it here. As with the Antigua Conference itself during which the Review is launched, I wonder if the people who do need to read it (the people in a position to act on its challenge) ever will. I started reading Paget Henry’s Entrepreneurial Socialism Vs Pragmatism: Reflections on the 2018 Elections in Antigua and Barbuda. Interesting so far. The Review started off slow for me, I admit, but six articles in I’m finally engaged. Did it have anything to do with the fact that article four was Joanne Hillhouse’s Iconic Stance Through Her Works by Valerie Knowles Combie (click the link to read)? Well I wasn’t uninterested in that but  reading about yourself is always kind of weird and disorienting so not as much as you might think.

I – Indicate which book/s you are looking forward to reading this weekend.

Well, the Review aside, my active reading pile has been mostly untouched all week. It’s been that kind of week. Plus I expect to re-start my Jhohadli Writing Project workshop September 2018 bthis weekend so I’ll need to re-read the stories I’ve selected for the workshop. Besides that I’m hoping to finish the Review and possibly Faye Kellerman’s Straight into Darkness. It’s been long enough and it really is an engaging mystery.

kellerman

F – Favorite quote of the week/day

I don’t know if this is my favourite quote but reading the photography book Hidden Secrets of St. Croix by Clarice Clarke (review to be added to the Blogger on Books series on my other blog soon), this was something that jumped out at me:

“On July 2nd 1848, enslaved Africans assembled at La Grange and other plantations. On July 3rd 1848, they gathered in Fredriksted and demanded their freedom. Fearing the destruction of the towns and plantations, Governor General Peter Von Scholten proclaimed emancipation. After the enslaved Africans were freed Budhoe (leader of the action taken by the enslaved Africans) was jailed and then sent to Trinidad…Emancipation, however, did not live up to the freed slaves’ expectations. Low wages, restrictive labor laws and regulations kept workers in unending servitude. In October of 1878, their dissatisfaction erupted in what is known as the ‘1878 fireburn.’” (pgs. 87-88)

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F – Five things you’re happy or grateful for this week.

Keeping it books, I’m going to share 8 books I revisited this week courtesy of the Seven Book Covers Challenge on facebook. Check them out.

anniebluesfarminginterviewludellsecondjanewide

Yes, the week was trying, but I definitely had fun with this one. Beyond that grateful to be a writer journeying (see recent developments in the journey here) and hope to continue to be so. And for the view outside my window today. You know somedays you look up and the thing that’s always there suddenly looks so beautiful to you, well that was the green hills dotted with houses of various colours sitting there like a framed picture beyond my window. How many does that leave? beer and pizza and good conversation with not one but both of my sibs. Oh and mischievous monkeys.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure, Musical Youth and With Grace). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

 

 

 

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