Tag Archives: Caribbean

Missed Announcements (Commonwealth, Burt)

I missed a couple of announcements which is understandable, this isn’t my job after all, but I wanted to get back to them even if they aren’t technically new(s) any more, because these authors deserve their dap – and because there are so few opportunities specifically for Caribbean writers, I like to highlight the ones that are. Call it inspiration for any of the rest of us out here putting pen to paper (fingers to keyboard, thumbs to keypad, whatever) every day.

Commonwealth

First up. This dude. This dude right here!hosein

He made all the newspapers in his native Trinidad and Tobago for being that rare unicorn to repeat a Commonwealth Short Story Writers Prize win. The Commonwealth Short Story Prize is awarded for the best piece of unpublished short fiction (2000 – 5000 words) across the Commonwealth. The overall winner receives £5,000 and regional winners receive £2,500. Translators receive additional prize money. Hosein, as I mentioned on my facebook, has been on a roll lately between being longlisted for Bocas (for The Repenters in 2017), being shortlisted/placing second for the Burt Award (for The Beast of Kukuyo in 2017), and now winning his second Regional (Caribbean) Prize for the Commonwealth Short Story Competition. I had a conversation recently with someone about whether it was fair for past winners to repeat and I think it is – a past winner is still a writer, writing, and not as set for life as some might like to think, and if the judging is blind as we like to think it is then their odds of winning/losing are the same as anyone else’s. I don’t think it necessarily has to stack the deck. And if you break through in any competition against a proven winner wouldn’t that feel even more like a win? I don’t know, apples and oranges in terms of scope, but Wadadli Pen winners can keep competing no matter how many times they win, as long as they’re still age eligible, because for them and every entrant it’s about challenging themselves; at least that’s how I see it. I certainly plan to keep going for everything I’m eligible for because I’m far from set/still hungry and because I always want to challenge myself to be better. A competition isn’t really an exact science as far as good, better, best is concerned – I know this all too well having been a judge of competitions myself – but for me the challenge isn’t really on the judges’ end but on mine, challenging myself to be better than I was two sentences ago. When it’s a personal challenge like that, chances are you may be inclined to step back anyway because been there, won that. Though of course that prize money and the come-up a win gives a writer is also nothing to cut your eye at. Within all of it though, hopefully bigger than all of it, is the desire to continue telling your stories:

“Trinidad and Tobago writes itself. It writes loudly and quietly at the same time. Loudly, because it likes to boast of its best and worst parts. Quietly, because it thinks nobody cares to listen. This win, along with the many voices year after year whom have shortlisted and won for this little twin-island nation, is reinforced proof that people out there are entertained by our stories, derive meaning and relevance from them, and are moved by them. It is proof that people care to listen”. – Kevin Jared Hosein

Since you’re here btw, take a new look at a post Kevin did about writing and publishing from the Caribbean; I’ve recommended it for people trying to understand the industry, and recommend it here again for you – he breaks it down way better than I’ve been able to.

Burt

I posted the short list and a run down of all previous winners (and their books) of the Burt Award but don’t think I ever got around to coming back and letting you know the top three winners’ ranking. Not that it matters – apart from a little more bank depending on where you are in the ranking – as, per Burt’s template, all three top three will be published and widely distributed across the region. This makes the Burt Award – sponsored by Canadian non-profit CODE and replicated among the Canadian First Nations/Natives community and all of Africa – a tangible path to publication.

So you can look out for new books from Guyanese writer Imam Baksh (who claimed his second Burt win – top spot), Barbadian writer (and filmmaker – second in the ranking) Shakirah Bourne, and Bermudan writer (editor, tutor – third overall) Elizabeth J. Jones.  In addition to the book orders (up to 2,500 copies of each book), Burt also gives lump sum cash prizes to the winners – 10,000 CAD to the winner and 2,000 CAD each to the finalists. See the winners’ announcement here.

Looking forward to their books and I really do encourage you teachers, parents, aunts with teens – Caribbean or otherwise but especially Caribbean – in your life to introduce them to at least one of these books. These are modern tales of the young Caribbean experience or tales with particular, though not exclusive, appeal to this age group.

See the full list to date.

See also Caribbean Reads publisher Carol Mitchell’s encouragement to writers from the so-called small islands to big up themselves in these contests and Opportunities with upcoming deadlines for anyone seeking to challenge themselves to do just that.

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Antiguan and Barbudan writer Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure; also a freelance writer, editor, writing coach and workshop facilitator). Excerpting, reblogging, linking etc. is fine, but PLEASE do not lift ANY content (images or text) wholesale from this site without asking first and crediting the creator of that work and/or copyright holder. All Rights Reserved. If you like the content here follow or recommend the blog, also, check out my page on WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. Thank you.

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Small island writers encouraged to submit to Burt Award

‘”(Carol) Mitchell, who is the author of the popular Caribbean Adventure Series and Barberry Hill, also runs a burgeoning publishing company called CaribbeanReads. Her company focuses on the young adult genre and has in the past published some of the Burt Award winners, including Antiguan (and Barbudan) Joanne C. Hillhouse’s ‘Musical Youth.’

However, she is concerned that most of the winners come from the larger Caribbean nations, such as Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, and Guyana and the competition is missing out on the great talent in the smaller islands.

“I do believe the results reflect perhaps, a lack of access to the resources that may be key to producing a polished manuscript that has a shot at winning,” says Mitchell.

She explained that while the judges accept work that has not yet been accepted by a publisher, these manuscripts are expected to be at the same level of structural soundness, grammatical and logical accuracy, and thematic relevance as any published manuscripts that may be submitted.

“It is important for would-be submitters to ensure their work is in the best possible condition,” she says. “If you are planning to submit a novel, there are a few things you should do. If you haven’t already done so, read some of the work of previous winners and of highly acclaimed young adult novels that are similar in theme to yours. This is not so you can copy their plot or style but so that you can get a feel for the type of writing that appeals to young people (and to the judges). If you don’t enjoy reading these books, the young adult genre may not be right for you.”’ – Read the full article at Dominica News Online

Read more about this and other Opportunities and upcoming deadlines (Opportunities Too) here at Wadadli Pen. Also check out these Resources the site continues to compile to assist writers on the journey. To read about past Caribbean Burt titles, go here.

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Mailbox – People’s Choice T&T

You’ll remember that I tried to host a people’s choice for Antiguan and Barbudan book of the year at the end of 2017 that was dead on arrival (didn’t get close to the minimum number of votes needed to declare a winner). It was one of the most viewed posts of the year on the site but, for whatever reason, votes were very few. I was disappointed because I thought it was a fun way for fans to give a favourite book a boost – a boost for local literary arts overall. But, dey e dey.

That initiative was inspired by the Trinidad and Tobago People’s Choice book awards which was much better organized, resourced, and successful. They did it right and had quite the response, and a writer who might otherwise have flown under the radar (i.e. a writer who had not been in conversation vis-à-vis other awards coming out of TnT, like Bocas) gets some dap.

That writer is…Soulspection

Announcing the winner of the 2018 People’s Choice T&T Book of the Year

The overall winner, as chosen by the voting public, is Soulspection: A Collection of Poetry, by Michelle Borel.

The other books in the final voting round were (in alphabetical order by title):

21 Powerful P’s to Success, by Nichola Harvey
Don’t Go Mango Picking, by D.H. Gibbs
Everyone Knows I Am a Haunting, by Shivanee Ramlochan (also a Forward Prize Best First Collection 2018 nominee)
Men and Misfits, by Lyndon Baptiste
The Repenters, by Kevin Jared Hosein (also long listed for the 2017 Bocas prize)

Congratulations to all the finalists!

An initiative of the Bocas Lit Fest in partnership with Newsday and NALIS, the prize was intended to promote reading and buying of local books, and to get people talking about them. Judy Raymond, editor-in-chief of the Trinidad & Tobago Newsday, shared this sentiment, saying “Obviously as a news organization we want more people to read  — and write — and this prize is a brilliant way to encourage people to do both! As the people’s paper we’re especially glad to be associated with a prize that’s awarded to a local writer by local readers.”

A total of 39 books were entered for judging, and Borel’s book earned the most votes from a finalists’ list of 6.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

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Shout Out, Shivanee

33232540_10160478055985302_8151969136080060416_nShout out to Trinidadian-Tobagonian poet Shivanee Ramlochan who with Everyone Knows I am a Haunting has copped a nomination for the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. Shivanee has written for a number of years about the writing of others offering critiques of new and classic works in Caribbean Beat (also Caribbean Review of Books), at the Paper-Based bookshop’s blog (she’s also blogged for the Bocas lit fest), on her own platform Novel Niche, the Trinidad and Tobago Guardian, and likely other places.  And now she’s out there in a big way.

She is in position to join other recent Forward Prize winners from the Caribbean including Best Collection winners Vahni Capildeo of Trinidad and Tobago (2016), Claudia Rankine of Jamaica (2015), Kei Miller of Jamaica (2014), and Best First Collection winner Tiphanie Yanique of the US Virgin Islands (2016). Richard Georges of the British Virgin Islands (who recently released the latest edition of Moko, the pan-Caribbean online literary journal that he co-founded) was a Best First Collection nominee in 2017.

Congratulations, Shivanee.

ETA: Ooops, shout out as well to T & T’s Vahni Capildeo who is once again up for the Forward Prize for Best Collection. Dope.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

 

 

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Current Caribbean Controversies – Links

I’ve reported here on deaths and triumphs in the Caribbean literary community. Seems only fitting to share a couple of current controversies that have attracted their share of international press and much discussion. These things are in very different lanes, but have similarly stirred up emotions. But both can be filed under conversations that need to be had. I’ll share some links (and there are additional links within the links) and you can read and engage with the issues as you wish.

African-American author Zinzi Clemmons called out Dominican-American writer Junot Diaz for sexually inappropriate behavior.

“Ms. Clemmons, who teaches writing at Occidental College in Los Angeles, said in a tweet that when she was a graduate student, Mr. Díaz had forcibly kissed her. Her claims swiftly set off other accusations of abusive and inappropriate behavior by Mr. Díaz.” (The New York Times)

Diaz’s Response: ““I take responsibility for my past,” he said. “That is the reason I made the decision to tell the truth of my rape and its damaging aftermath. This conversation is important and must continue. I am listening to and learning from women’s stories in this essential and overdue cultural movement. We must continue to teach all men about consent and boundaries.” (The New York Times)

The reaction of the literary community: “The allegations against Mr. Díaz came as a shock to some in the literary world, but other responses to the news on social media suggested that there had long been rumors about his behavior toward women. Several prominent writers, including Cheryl Strayed, Alexander Chee, Celeste Ng, and Jesmyn Ward responded to Ms. Clemmons’s tweet, expressing sympathy and support….“Everyone in the literary world/the media knew this, or suspected it. And yet, when Junot Díaz published his New Yorker essay — a pre-emptive strike if there ever was one — we gave him nothing but plaudits,” EJ Dickson, an editor at Men’s Health Magazine, wrote.” (The New York Times)

This comes amidst the watershed moment that is the #metoo movement. ETA (May 23rd 2018): This is not Caribbean specific but we have two Caribbean Nobel Laureates for literature, so I’ll add it; the Nobel Prize for Literature has been postponed for the first time in 70 years due to a sexual assault scandal. “The controversy emerged in November, in the midst of the #MeToo movement, when 18 women accused French photographer Jean-Claude Arnault of sexual assault. Arnault is the artistic director of Forum, a cultural event venue in Stockholm, which received funding from the Swedish Academy between 2010 and 2017. Last week Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden became the latest alleged victim to be named. Others include female academy members, and the wives and daughters of male members.” (Buzzfeed News)

***

The most heatedly discussed issue in Caribbean literary circles though, if my newsfeed is at all indicative of what’s trending, has been Britain-based Jamaican writer Kei Miller’s essay in Pree, a new online literary publication out of Jamaica. It has stirred up conversation (not just agreement and disagreement, but also hurt and contentious back-and-forth) about race, class, gender, privilege, identity, and related issues in the Caribbean, as well as about the line between public and private discourse.

‘Asking “how many years and decades must pass before we can belong to a place and to its words? How much time before we can write it?”, the essay saw the Forward prize-winning author discuss his interactions with four white women writers from the region, evaluating their books, and the way they have interacted with the local literary community.’ (The Guardian – UK)

Some of the reaction: ‘The essay drew both praise and condemnation from writers. Rhoda Bharath called it “a necessary addition to the global cultural conversations around identity, appropriation and privilege”, while Veerle Poupeye wrote, in an open letter to Miller, that “parts of the essay are indeed breathtaking, because of the writing and because of the sublime insights you offer”, but took issue with Miller’s publication of private conversations, his focus on white women and not white men, and his representation of the women in the essay.’ (The Guardian – UK)

Also this personal essay by Trinidad and Tobago Writer Lisa Allen-Agostini sparked by the controversy though not strictly speaking about the original piece: ‘”I cried with one of the women alluded to in the piece when I saw her at Bocas. But I also said to Kei Miller, “I don’t like how you said it, but we do need to talk openly about race. History’s not over.”’ (Newsday – T&T)

The linked sources give a comprehensive breakdown of the issues which is why they were selected. For more (including different takes), there’s always google. Again, these controversies are not linked, clearly, in their nature just in terms of their Caribbean-ness, their topicality, and that each in its own way has touched some kind of nerve and stirred up an ants nests.  Posted here in keeping with the information sharing that I’ve tried to do on this site.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

 

 

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Surveys for Caribbean Writers

I just spent some time filling out these two surveys targeted at Caribbean writers and I think you should too – because this kind of research if harnessed correctly can bring about the kind of growth we want to see in the industry.

This one is by Anansesem and is targeted at writers of children’s fiction and, I think, applies to writers of teen/young adult fiction as well.

This one is by the Caribbean Literary Heritage project and is targeted at all Caribbean writers, polling how much care and interest they put in to what happens to their papers.

Check them out.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

 

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Barbados, Guyana, and Bermuda Finalists for 2018 Burt Award

The Burt Award for Caribbean teen/young adult fiction is sponsored by Canadian non-profit CODE and administered by Trinidad and Tobago’s Bocas Literary Festival. The winner will be announced at this year’s festival, scheduled for April 25th to 29th 2018. In the running are Shakirah M. Bourne of Barbados (below right), Imam Baksh of Guyana (below left), and Elizabeth J. Jones of Bermuda (below middle).

2018-burt-finalists

Here’s the announcement making the rounds:

CODE and NGC Bocas Lit Fest are thrilled to announce the finalists for the 5th annual CODE Burt Award for Caribbean Young Adult Literature. This year’s finalists were selected from over 30 submissions of both published books and unpublished manuscripts from around the Caribbean.

In alphabetical order by title, the 2018 finalists are:
A Dark Iris by Elizabeth J. Jones (Bermuda)

Jury Summary: “A sophisticated ‘speculative fiction’ story that reveals the realities of adolescence; crushes, family problems, and school. The main character is real and relatable.

My Fishy Stepmom by Shakirah Bourne (Barbados)

Jury Summary: “A delightful story that is charmingly funny. With a folktale antagonist, the shenanigans that result as the main character fights to preserve her bonds of family and friendship are heartwarming.”

The Dark of the Sea by Imam Baksh (Guyana)

Jury Summary: “A compelling page turner, this fantastical adventure story follows the journey of a young man who is rebellious, unimpressed by education and religion, cynical about the future, and obsessed with girls. The humour is dark, the morality complicated, …and the victories bittersweet.”

The winner and two finalists will be announced on 25 April 2018 at the opening night celebration of the 2018 NGC Bocas Lit Fest in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. Celebrating YA literature will continue throughout the NGC Bocas Lit Fest.

Since 2014 a dedicated network of local partners has distributed more than 37,000 award-winning books in eleven Caribbean countries. We look forward to seeing this year’s winning books published and distributed to youth throughout the Caribbean.

***

I would like to add my congratulations to the finalists. It’s no secret that this award is one that means a lot to me – since being a finalist in the inaugural year, 2014, I’ve had the opportunity to work with CODE as a workshop facilitator and a mentor to the Africa leg of the programme (which also has a Canada leg focused on the First nations community), and as a judge with Bocas. I like that the programme in Canada, the Caribbean, and Africa is opening up publishing opportunities for those underserved by the industry. As for the Caribbean leg, I like that it’s leading to the production of new, or increased promotion and distribution of, books that are culturally relevant and whether historical, modern, or futuristic engaging to the teen/young adult reader. Having grown up reading so many books from overseas, it’s nice to know that today’s Caribbean teen has more options. I also like that it not only gives Caribbean independent presses an opportunity but insists on publishing with Caribbean publishers, which can only be good for the industry in the region. The books are distributed throughout the region – and, of course, a savvy publisher will also work to build the overseas readership as well. So, because of the opportunities it offers to Caribbean writers, teen/young adult readers, and publishing industry, I hope this programme has the resources to keep going. I mean, look at the literature that has come out of it already:

all over again - cover FAW 05JUN2013All Over Again by A-dZiko Simba Gegele (1st place, 2014) – author from: Jamaica; published by Blue Moon Publishing of Jamaica.

“All Over Again is a hilarious and enchanting coming of age story as a young boy goes through the trials and joys and puberty, battles with his 6-year-old sister who is the bane of his existences, worries about disappointing his mother and understanding his father…”

rosesThe Art of White Roses by Viviana Prado-Nunez (1st place, 2017) – author from: Puerto Rico; published by Papillote Press of Dominica/UK.

“It is 1957, in a quiet Havana suburb. Adela Santiago is 13 and lives in a small blue house with her family. But something is amiss…”

HoseinThe Beast of Kukuyo by Kevin Jared Hosein ( 2nd place, 2017) – author from: Trinidad and Tobago; published by Blue Banyan Books of Jamaica.

“You’re standing alongside Tiki and running next to Rune at the same time, looking for clues in the forest and admiring the beautiful Trinidadian landscape as you move through this adventurous tale…”

children of the spider 001Children of the Spider by Imam Baksh (1st place, 2015) – author from: Guyana; published by Blue Moon Publishing of Jamaica.

“Mayali is a fugitive from her home world of Zolpash, which is ruled by the Spider gods and their armies, who now have plans to invade Earth—it’s up to Mayali to thwart them…”

dancing in the rain 001Dancing in the Rain by Lynn Joseph (3rd place, 2015) – author from: Trinidad and Tobago; published by Blue Moon Publishing of Jamaica.

“Set against the dazzling beauty of the Dominican Republic, Dancing in the Rain explores the impact of the tragic fall of the Twin Towers on two Caribbean families…”

Dreams-Beyond-the-Shore-front-lr-190x300Dreams Beyond the Shore by Tamika Gibson (1st place, 2016) – author from: Trinidad and Tobago; published by: Blue Banyan Books of Jamaica.

“Seventeen-year-old Chelsea Marchand was pretty satisfied with her life. Until recently. Willing to play the dutiful daughter as her father’s bid to become Prime Minister of their island home brings her family into intense public scrutiny, Chelsea is swept along by the strong tidal wave of politics and becomes increasingly disturbed by her father’s duplicity…”

Girlcott-cover-192x300Girlcott by Florenz Webbe Maxwell (2nd place, 2016) – author from Bermuda; published by Blue Banyan Books of Jamaica.

“A week ago, Desma Johnson had only two things on her mind – in exactly eight days, she would be sixteen years old and to top it off she was inline for a top scholarship, bringing her one step closer to her dreams. Life was perfect and nothing would get in the way of her birthday plans. But it’s 1959 and the secret Progressive Group has just announced a boycott of all cinemas in Bermuda in order to end racial segregation…”

Papillote_-_Gone_to_DriftGone to Drift by Diana McCaulay (2nd place, 2015)  – author from Jamaica; published by Papillote Press of Dominica/UK.

“The story of a 12-year-old Jamaican boy and his search for his beloved grandfather, a fisherman who is lost at sea…”

agostiniHome Home by Lisa Allen-Agostini (3rd place, 2017) – author from Trinidad and Tobago; published by Papillote Press of Dominica/UK.

“A coming-of-age tale with a twist: a clinically depressed Trinidadian teenager, who has attempted suicide, is banished by her mother to Canada to live with her aunt. She feels lonely and in exile. But…”

innerInner City Girl by Colleen Smith-Dennis (3rd place, 2014) – author from Jamaica; published by LMH Publishing Company of Jamaica.

“Martina does the unthinkable: a poor girl from the inner city gains entry into one of the most prestigious high schools in the country. Milverton High, situated on a hill with its picturesque surroundings, students from the upper echelons of society and teachers who do not neccessarily understand, contrasts with the poverty, hunger and family problems which Martina encounters. But Martina is not about to succumb to ridicule, rejection, and poverty…”

Musical YouthMusical Youth by Joanne C. Hillhouse (2nd place, 2014) – author from Antigua and Barbuda; published by Caribbean Reads of St. Kitts-Nevis/USA.

“Zahara is a loner. She’s brilliant on the guitar but in everyday life she doesn’t really fit in. Then she meets Shaka, himself a musical genius and the first boy who really gets her. They discover that they share a special bond…”

Protectors-pledge-cover-187x300The Protectors’ Pledge by Daniel V. C. Mclean (3rd place, 2016) – author from Trinidad and Tobago; published by Caribbean Reads of St. Kitt’s-Nevis/USA

“Twelve-year-old JV can’t wait to spend his vacation exploring the Oscuros Forest. True, everyone in the village of Alcavere believes the Oscuros Forest is a place to be feared, inhabited by dangerous and magical beings. But JV is not afraid, even when his first trip into the forest brings him face-to-face with a mysterious creature…”

And now there are three more books to look forward to.

Two finals thoughts. If you have a teen in your life, there’s got to be something on this list that appeals to them and if you’re a writer, embrace this opportunity to put your name and your country on this list, and potentially put your book in the hands of readers across the Caribbean and beyond.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

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