Tag Archives: Competition

Wadadli Pen Update – Workshop

We want you to win.

One of the ways team member (author of Turtle Beach, The Legend of Bat’s Cave and Other Stories, and even more stories) Barbara A. Arrindell is trying to help you win is with an announced March 18th 2021 workshop. This series of short workshops will provide you with tips that may help you to select your topic, develop your characters, allow your creativity to flow, utilize local sites and folklore, and much more. You must pre-register. Do this by sending a message via the link above or via email to barbaraarrindell@yahoo.com. The zoom link and additional information will then be sent to you. Register early to secure your spot. This year Wadadli Pen is accepting entries from children and adults.

The submission deadline for the 2021 Wadadli Pen Challenge is March 26th 2021. I just posted videos (one to my AntiguanWriter YouTube Channel and one to the Wadadli Pen YouTube Channel – both which you should rush over and subscribe to by the way) of a recent interview I did breaking things down re both the Challenge and the #readAntiguaBarbuda #voteAntiguaBarbuda readers choice book of the year initiative.

Re FAQs

A recent commenter here on the blog asked about the submission form. “Would it be possible to fill out the application form electronically please? I do not have access to a printer right now and it would be very useful if alternative methods could be made available. Thank you!” – A. It’s a fair point; we should look in to uploading directly via submittable or other platform, but to be clear you do not need to print the form and you are submitting electronically. What you need to do is download and fill out the form electronically and submit said form via email as an attachment along with your entry, also as an attachment, to wadadlipen@gmail.com

A questioner to my DMs wondered if there was a penalty for going over the word count. – A. We’ve actually extended the word count from 750 to 1000 words in recent years. Since doing so we’ve gotten fairly strict about the word count. Challenge yourself to tell your story with precision – after all, you already have 250 extra words to play with.

We also had a request to direct mail the submission form; obviously it’s not practical for us to do so for everyone. We simply don’t have the time nor the numbers. But I’ve doublechecked that the form is downloadable and can be filled out electronically; so please act accordingly. Find the form and submission guidelines above at Wadadli Pen 2021.

ICYMI

In case you missed it, we’ve followed up our launch announcement with a second press release shouting out the latest patrons to come on board. The news you may be particularly interested in from that is that, while the Challenge is open to all ages this year, we will have a special prize for 12 and younger aged writers, sponsored by Cedric Holder, who is doing so in the name of his son Zuri, a former Wadadli Pen finalist who died tragically in the first road fatality of 2021. Also team member Floree Williams Whyte’s Moondancer Books has sponsored the ad below.

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Carib Lit Plus Early to Mid November 2020

A reminder that the process with these Carib Lit Plus Caribbean arts bulletins is to do a front and back half of the month, updating as time allows as new information comes in; so, come back. (in brackets, as much as I can remember, I’ll add a note re how I sourced the information)

Kudos

Dawn French, Zoanne Evans, Adaiah Sanford, Arnold Ward, Karllen Lawrence, and Robertha Alleyne have been named as finalists in the first annual Caribbean Literary Works competition. The top applicants’ video pitches can be viewed on organizer the Ducreay Foundation, a non profit collaborating on the prize with Reycraft Books’, social media. At the end of the competition there will be three top finalists.
Winner: Reycraft publishing contract +5000 USD advance+ royalties from books being sold
Second Prize:2000 USD + Full free editorial review and mentorship by REYCRAFT Books
Third Prize:1000 USD+Full free editorial review and mentorship by REYCRAFT Books
The foundation – through its educational workshops, forums and activities strives to bridge the gap between different peoples, genders and backgrounds. It was founded by Ms. Dahlia A. Ducreay commonly known as “Dee”. She is a bilingual educational economist (Fluent Mandarin and English) from the Commonwealth of Dominica with extensive social, educational and economic development experience, who has worked and lived in Asia (People’s Republic of China) for over 10 years.

Reycraft Books is an American publishing house based in New York.

(Source – This one came in via email and I subsequently communicated with the founder Dahlia Ducreay)

Milestones

Lorna Goodison’s tenure as poet laureate of Jamaica has come to an end with well deserved plaudits. Goodison succeeded Mervyn Morris. Her tenure ran for three years. Jamaica is one of a small handful of Caribbean nations that has laureate programmes. The laureate works to enliven literary activity around literary arts in country and between the country and the world. (Source – St. Lucian poet John Robert Lee shared this article via email)

Caribbean Arts Funding (an update)

Arts funding and/or philanthropy allowing Caribbean writers to do what they do, create, is rare. But Catapult – a joint initiative by American Friends of Jamaica (a NY non profit with a 40 year history of funding charitable organizations in Jamaica), Kingston Creative (a Jamaica non profit set up in 2017 to enable creatives to succeed), and Fresh Milk (a Barbados charity which provides residencies and programmes to enable Caribbean artists to grow)- has made lemonade of these 2020 lemons, providing something that has long been needed – financial support with opportunities to write, to connect, to share, to grow. “In recognition of the serious impact of COVID-19 on the creative industries, a $320,000 fund from the Open Society Foundations was awarded to the American Friends of Jamaica, in collaboration with Kingston Creative and The Fresh Milk Art Platform, to support artists, creators and cultural practitioners throughout the Caribbean region. This grant recognizes the current global pandemic, a crisis that disproportionately affects the creative sector in Small Island Developing States (SIDS), few of which have the resources to provide adequate support to those working in this vital sector.” (Source: ACP-EU Culture)

We have reported on the Catapult grants in trickles but thought it prudent to provide a round up with context. The funding has been allocated to six areas: Caribbean Arts Showcase, Caribbean Creative Online, Digital Creative Training, Consultancy Vouchers, Lockdown Virtual Salon, and Stay Home Artist Residency.

The Caribbean Arts Showcase will present features by artists in written, video, or audio format which will be published to promote the talent and diversity in the region, and to give insight into the work and life of creatives.

The Caribbean Creative Online component of CATAPULT invites artists to share a recording of a performance, talk, webinar, workshop or other online activity on the platform of their choice. The goal is to increase artists’ visibility in the online arena, raise their comfort level with performing in the digital space, and support artists financially during the pandemic by allowing them to earn from online activities…Each of the 100 artists selected from across the English, French, Spanish and Dutch speaking Caribbean will receive a grant of $500 USD.” This list includes Jamaica’s Amina Blackwood-Meeks, whom Antiguans-Barbudans should know from her time here, Juleus Ghunta, whose works has been shared several times on the blog, AdZiko Simba Gegele, known around here as the first Burt Award winner, the Rebel Women Lit book club, Dominica’s Celia Sorhaindo, among others – including, as you’ll see below, yours truly.

The Digital Creative Training Workshops , creatives will develop essential digital knowledge and business skills to enable them to reach new audiences and markets which as a result of COVID-19 now must be accessed through digital tools and platforms.” There courses were held between September and October.

The CATAPULT Consultancy Voucher Programme provides professional expertise to cultural practitioners to aid in the development of entrepreneurial potential through their online presence. Creatives will receive consulting support from technical experts from the region to set up a website, social media platforms, or online store to increase their ability to conduct e-commerce and market their works globally. Each selected creative, 40 in total, will receive a $500 USD voucher to be used for website, social media, and/or e-commerce capability development.” Winners include Jamaican indie publisher Tanya Batson-Savage.

The CATAPULT Lockdown Virtual Salon programme aims to mitigate isolation, especially heightened during the current pandemic, by creating virtual platforms for cultural practitioners to engage in discourse about and explore their evolving practices. These one-hour artist talks from their homes or studios will be live-streamed via the Fresh Milk YouTube channel at 1PM and 4PM AST, every Tuesday and Friday between September 29th & November 20th, 2020.” You can also view the full playlist on the Fresh Milk YouTube if you miss the lives.

The Catapult Lockdown Virtual Salon begins here.

The CATAPULT Stay Home Artist Residency provides opportunities for 24 cultural practitioners from the English, French, Spanish and Dutch speaking Caribbean to be supported while safely remaining in their studios/work-spaces, each of whom will receive a $3,000 USD stipend to produce work over a two-month period.” This is the kind of support artists need and we can all look forward to the work to be produced by the likes of Trinidad and Tobago’s Lisa Allen-Agostini and Shivanee Ramlochan, and Bahamas’ Sonia Farmer, all of whom should be familiar to readers of the blog – with many more to discover.

Fresh Milk’s Founding Director Annalee Davis expressed enthusiasm regarding the partnership. “Fresh Milk is pleased to have the opportunity to partner on this critical project nurturing Caribbean artists. With little support available at the state level for so many cultural practitioners working across this vulnerable region, having an opportunity to facilitate Stay At Home Residencies and Virtual Salons means that more artists can safely remain in their studios and do what they do best-make art!” (Source)

What else to say except more of this, please.

(This has multiple sources – obviously, I’m an applicant and grantee but also the Salon updates have been flooding my instagram, and before that artist announcements on being awarded a grant has popped up on my facebook)

Events

Amanda Choo Quan, 2020 winner of the Johnson and Amoy Achong Caribbean Writers Prize, is hosting an online series called ‘Let’s Be Real’ — which takes the form of frank, solution-oriented discussions with editors, educators, agents, and more. “We aim to place Caribbean writers in conversation with people they would not normally have access to — international allies already dedicated to championing marginalised voices,” Choo Quan said. LIT’S BE REAL runs for a four-episode season every other Wednesday (4 and 18 November, 2 and 16 December, 2020), aiming to follow the arc of a writer’s career. Topics covered will include MFA and academic programmes, pitching and submitting articles to publications, and the troubling question of international audiences misunderstanding a Caribbean writer’s “voice.” Read more here. (Source – this one came to the Wadadli Pen mailbox from the Bocas Lit Fest, which also used the opportunity to announce season 3 of its virtual Bios and Bookmarks series, a series initially launched during COVID-19 lockdown)

***

The Best of Books bookstore braved the COVID-19 storm to host a live outside (masked up) meet the author event during the Independence season in Antigua and Barbuda. Of course, you can get the books in store any time.

Speaking of events, some of the videos I need to share are not a good fit for my youtube channel, so I made one for Wadadli Pen. Now, I just need an intern to run it. Here’s the first vid, from the Best of Books author event.

More pics and vids here.

(Source – having accepted an invite from the bookshop, I was at the event and asked them and participating author Brenda Lee Browne to send me pictures and video)


I will be recording a virtual Ask Me Anything and Reading as part of my Catapult Caribbean Creatives Online award. Ask your questions about themes, craft, and story related to my writing. Get them in this week by leaving them in the comments of any of my social media – video questions also welcomed. ETA: intake of questions have ended; video being prepped. Read about it here.


The National Public Library of Antigua and Barbuda’s Author of the Month series is back and the next author up is Floree Williams Whyte – author of Pink Teacups and Blue Dresses, Through the Window, and The Wonderful World of Yohan. Floree’s reading and book discussion is on November 25th 2020. And the best part is you can watch live on facebook from home. (Source – The NPL is active on facebook and I may have seen this flyer in my newsfeed there)


The Royal Society of Literature, in honour of its 200th birthday, and Bocas Lit Fest, in honour of its 10th, will be hosting an event, ‘What’s So Great about Jean Rhys?’ Dominican writer Jean Rhys wrote the seminal work Wide Sargasso Sea. Participants will include Trinidad and Tobago poet, columnist, and blogger Shivanee Ramlochan with novelist Linda Grant and academic Lauren Elkin. It’s on November 19th 2020. Register for the online event here. (Source – this came to my inbox with my rejection notification re the V S Pritchett prize)

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure/Perdida! Una Aventura en el Mar Caribe, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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A & B Arts Round up – July 19th 2019 —>

If you missed activities from the last round up, you can catch up with at least two of them in the CREATIVE SPACE series over on my Jhohadli blog – go here for Antigua Dance Academy’s Earth Rising and here for the Antigua-Barbuda launch of regional journalist Wesley Gibbings’ Passages at the Best of Books.

 

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August 15th – 16th 2019 – The 14th Annual Antigua-Barbuda Conference and Distinguished Lecture (a joint project of the University off the West Indies Open Campus – Antigua and Barbuda, The Antigua and Barbuda Studies Association, and the Antigua and Barbuda Youth Enlightenment Academy). This year’s theme is Aft the Ecological and Politica Storms: Whither Barbuda’s Development. Venue – the UWI Open Campus, between Queen Elizabeth and Sir Sydney Walling highways. Confirmed participants are Glenn Sankatsing, keynote speaker and author of Quest to Rescue Our Future (“Quest to Rescue Our Future chronicles the path of humanity, diagnoses our present misfortunes, identifies the dangerous trends and maps the desirable and feasible futures. Most importantly, it locates the transformative social forces that are still intact – the moral reserves of humanity – and delves into the strategy and actions that can shape a different version of humanity), Conference organizer Paget Henry, Valerie Knowles Combie from the University of the Virgin Islands, editor of The Caribbean Writer literary journal Alscess Lewis-Brown, psychologist and poet Elaine Olaoye, Bernadette Farquhar whose specialities are French and linguistics, Antigua and Barbuda’s press secretary Lionel ‘Max’ Hurst, Anique John (law/social justice), Hourglass Investment CEO Norris Morris Harris, and a special panel consisting of secondary school students). For more information contact: Paget Henry (paget_henry@brown.edu), Janet Lofgren (janetlofgren@gmail.com), Zane Peters (zane.peters@open.uwi.edu), or Schuyler Esprit (schuyler.esprit@dec.uwi.edu)

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July to August 2019 – Antigua’s Carnival

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July and August – sessions to be held on July 22nd – 26th & August 12th – 16th 2019 – flyer and registration form copied below-contact me at jhohadli at gmail dot com for more information or to submit registration form: JSYWP Registration Form 2019

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, unless otherwise indicated, this is written by author and Wadadli Pen founder and coordinator Joanne C. Hillhouse. All rights reserved.

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Good News for Six Caribbean Writers, Bad News for the Burt Award

Six shortlisted writers have been named though dampened by the concurrent announcement that the CODE sponsored Burt Award for teen/young adult Caribbean literature is coming to an end. The award was first bestowed in 2014 but with the death of its founder Canadian philanthropist Bill Burt in 2017 has come a shift in priorities – reportedly to environmental matters, which is a pressing concern in these perilous times. The Caribbean leg of the award has been administered these five years by the Bocas Literary Festival in Trinidad and Tobago  in partnership with the Canadian non-profit CODE which runs similar programmes in Africa and among the indigenous community in Canada – all of which will need alternative funding if they are to continue. The purpose and effect of the award has been to generate and distribute new writing from typically marginalized communities with the youth population as a specific target.

This year’s short list from a field of 46 consists of:

Jomo’s Story by Nastassian Brandon (Jamaica)

The Unmarked Girl by Jeanelle Frontin (Trinidad and Tobago)

The Accidental Prize by Tamika Gibson (Trinidad and Tobago)

The Mermaid Pools by Rehannah Azeeyah Khan (Trinidad and Tobago)

Daylight Come by Diana McCaulay (Jamaica)

Rise Of The Clearrock by Celia Sankar/ S.P. Claret (Trinidad and Tobago)

McCaulay and Gibson are repeat Burt finalists – Gibson placed first in 2016 for Dreams Beyond the Shore, subsequently published by Jamaica’s Blue Banyan Books, and McCaulay’s Gone to Drift was second placed in 2015 and subsequently published by Papillote Press of Dominica and the UK. The list of past Burt finalists can be found here.

From a 2019 Burt/Bocas email: ‘Action, adventure, fantasy, myth, and forbidden love are some of the themes that feature in the shortlist. The judges were effusive in their praise for the quality of the writing, the credibility of the characters and the effectiveness of the plots in these six titles. Their comments on the entries range from “haunting” and “dark” to “enjoyable, fun, educational” and “ground breaking”.’

The winner and up to two finalists will be announced during the NGC Bocas Lit Fest, May 1st to 5th in Trinidad, with $10,000 CDN going to the winning book and $2,000 CDN each to two finalists. A distinctive feature of the Burt award which accepts both published and unpublished manuscripts is that it invites regional publishers to bid for the opportunity to publish one of the winning titles, and purchases and distributes copies of the finished product – the former helping to build the publishing infrastructure in the region, the latter ensuring that the books get in to the hands of their target readership.

Personal note: I am sorry to see this competition die (potentially, if it doesn’t find new funding – though Bocas has done a good job of sourcing alternative funding for, for instance, the Hollick Arvon prize which is now the the Johnson and Amoy Achong Caribbean Writers Prize). I think Burt has been good in terms of generating fresh content and creating renewed enthusiasm among secondary schoolers especially for Caribbean writing to which they feel they can relate. That’s certainly been my experience with Musical Youth, my second placed Burt title, published by Caribbean Reads Publishing, in its inaugural year, 2014, and now on schools reading lists in two Caribbean islands (but more than that the word of mouth enthusiasm from teenage readers). I am happy to have had the opportunity to serve as a Burt Award workshop leader here in Antigua, as a judge of the Caribbean leg of the award, as a mentor of the Africa leg, and as a Burt title editor; I have also enthusiastically promoted the programme – whether reviewing books like All over Again, Gone to Drift, Home Home, and Inner City Girl, which are unsurprisingly of high quality, or encouraging people to enter the competition. I only wish more of us, small islanders, had made it to the winners’ circle – to date (not including 2019) winning books have hailed from Trinidad and Tobago (5), Jamaica (3), Guyana (2), Bermuda (2), Barbados (1),  Puerto Rico (1), and Antigua and Barbuda (1). I want to thank Mr. Bill Burt for this initiative; he did a good thing.

I hope that some other philanthropist or philanthropists sees that arts funding is also a priority – especially in such perilous times.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

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Celebrating Innovation: Team Project Jaguar Triumphs at DadliHack 2019

Let me make sure I have this right because it’s not my usual forte though it caught my interest because it was about motivating young people to innovate solutions to climate change – what I hear is encouraging young people to create. Right?

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That’s Team Project Jaguar of Antigua and Barbuda, the youngest team in the contest, collecting their $5000 prize at DadliHack 2019 for a “Data analysis system that logs data from events like Sargassum seaweed occurrences and meteorological data (sea surface temperature, tides, winds)…then applie(s) it to statistical algorithms to analyze patterns, trends and make predictions. Chemical sensors will be placed on relevant shorelines to detect and log the presence of Sargassum. The insight will be sold to hotels, restaurants and other stakeholders in the tourism industry so that they can prepare and tackle the problem before it even hits our shores. It’s all about being proactive rather than reactive to the effects of climate change on islands.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

This innovation – an online platform called NADIS – was adjudged winner alongside reportedly fierce competition from across the region (who did their three-minute pitches via skype), “based on criteria including speed of build and delivery of the solution, who and how many people they would be helping, and the self-resilience of the solution.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

Ocean Generation, according to their website, worked along with local company ACT, which supplied the high speed internet connection that allowed the hackathon teams to explore and develop their ideas; and the goal was to build climate change awareness among young people. “Ocean Generation held a tech training course for children ages 12-16 to develop their interests and inform them of the potential perils of climate change. The focus was on the urgency for an elevated infrastructure, and the required refurbished resilience as they pave the road ahead.” (Source: oceangeneration.org)

Pitched ideas “ranged from community application to connect skilled laborers to find employment after natural disasters, to … a post-disaster drone system to identify crisis areas… (to) an idea to assist commercial and residential properties with energy efficient technology which can improve the energy management of small island developing states.” The panel of judges included Donna Levin (MIT business professor), Dr Martin Edlund CEO of Minesto, Jonas Michanek SONY/IDEON executive, alongside local Antiguan representatives.

Going forward a hub will be set up in Antigua and Barbuda to support not only the winners and to incubate their idea, but a variety of ideas from the DadliHack with the goal of activating and possibly testing winning climate change responses as soon as 2019.

Kudos.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (founder and coordinator of Wadadli Pen, and author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. Subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. 

There’s still time to vote in the #readAntiguaBarbuda #voteAntiguaBarbuda Readers Choice Book of the Year initiative.

 

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Mailbox – Commonwealth Short Story Prize

I have opened two rejections in my mailbox in the past hour. That acknowledgment (after several books and more than 10 years as a published writer) is made in the spirit of commiseration with anyone feeling discouraged today as they navigate this writing life.

The first rejection “yada yada yada” ended with “Your work came very close! Please try us next year.” And I will. I joke that it’s because writers are masochists but I think it’s because a commitment to the writing life means picking yourself up, skinned knees and all, and walking on until your legs give out … or maybe until you find something that pulls you as much as the writing life does.

And so, turning to that other entry from the rejection file, to the 1476 5182 short story writers at all different stages and levels of this writing life from all over the Commonwealth who didn’t make the cut for this year’s Commonwealth Short Story Prize, I want to take a moment to say (to all of us, because rejections are a part of the writing life but they still suck) be encouraged, keep writing, keep striving to be better writers, stay on that road. And put some iodine on those knees.

Now shake off the dispiritedness and any badmindness you may be feeling (let’s be real), and join me in saying to the writers of the 24 shortlisted stories, big up yuh chest!

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You’ve earned it.

Big up especially to the Caribbean writers making the cut Jamaicans Marcus Bird (An Elephant in the Kingdom) and Sharma Taylor (Son Son’s Birthday), perennial finalist of this and other Prizes (and published author) Trinidad and Tobago writer Kevin Hosein (Passage), and Breanne McIvor, also of T & T (The Boss). Caribbean to the World!

The regional winners – i.e. winners from the Caribbean, Canada and Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific – will be announced in late June, and the overall winner in late July.

Here now is the shortlist.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

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Mailbox – Who’s Judging You?

Did you submit to the Commonwealth Short Story Competition? I hope you did, I posted a reminder in Opportunites Too. Are you anxiously awaiting the results? Exhale, nothing to be done now but wait…and keep writing. Are you curious about who’s judging this year’s entries? That I can help with as the judges’ bios landed in my inbox this week.

“The 2018 Commonwealth Short Story Prize judging panel is chaired by Sarah Hall. The international judging panel comprises a judge from each of the five regions – Africa, Asia, Canada and Europe, the Caribbean and the Pacific.”

Of the chair, the correspondence said, “Sarah Hall received a master of letters in creative writing from Scotland’s St. Andrews University and has published five award-winning novels and a collection of short stories, Beautiful Indifference which won the Portico Prize for Fiction 2012 and the Edge Hill short story prize. In 2013 she was named one of Granta’s ‘Best Young British Novelists’, and she has won the BBC National Short Story Award and the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She has judged a number of prestigious literary awards and prizes including the Man Booker. She has tutored for the Faber Academy, The Guardian, the Arvon Foundation, and has taught creative writing in a variety of establishments in the UK and abroad.”

You can go here to read about the judges from the other regions, including the Caribbean’s Mark McWatt, a Guyanese national and past Commonwealth and Casa de las Americas prize winner.

Fingers crossed, right? I mean, the only thing that’s up for grabs is “a total prize money of £15,000. The overall winner receives £5,000, one of the highest amounts for an international short story prize open to unpublished writers. Regional winners receive £2,500” – and the distinction of winning the Commonwealth Short Story Competition.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

 

 

 

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The Art of Design

21231750_10214197102507537_5084057354635053102_nI’ll admit that this contest wasn’t really on my radar before and it only is this year because my niece emerged as the winner. In any case, it’s in step with some of what we do here, share and celebrate young Antiguans and Barbudans doing creative things; so I thought this was an appropriate platform to share. Per coverage in the local press, Nicoya Henry (in black and braids, 2nd from right in the top image) has emerged winner, from a field of nine, of the 2017 Courts Fashionista Competition.

“In a release from Courts, the furniture store said the event was conceptualized with the primary purpose of improving and developing the talent of our youth.” – from the Daily Observer, September 1st 2017

Growing up, Nicoya’s love of fashion and modelling ran alongside her love of art and design – she’s modelled on local, regional, and international runaways and she’s won visual art competitions like St. Anthony’s Sidewalk Art Festival. In recent years, her love of art has found expression through fashion – she’s performed well in the fashiontastic design competition (and in fact, runners-up in this contest, Shem Henry and Shirrine Gillon, are names I first came to know at Fashiontastic), organizes and promotes a fashion event called Fashion Formation, and gets her side hustle on creating clothing. So, the evolution continues with her win of the Courts competition.

It was a very Project Runway type of competition in spirit – right down to competitors getting a stipend to purchase material needed to create their designs (the equivalent of having access to that store they do on the show) and designing in response to a unique, shall we say, challenge. As Nicoya explained it to me, contestants had to do a design based on a Courts product (for those who don’t know, Courts is a furniture store). This was her item:

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This was her drawing: 21325878_10154959746868481_638764358_n

And this is the final design on the runway:21361156_10154959704348481_5524166_n

She walked with EC$2500 and the title, and said in the post-interview: “I feel very, very great that I won. I put in a lot of hard work, and it wasn’t easy breaking those mirrors. Right now, I still have splinters in my fingers, but it has paid off.” – from the Daily Observer, September 4th 2017

Cool, right?

To quote an audience member quoted in the paper “Our people have talent and I believe they can compete on any stage around the world.” – from the Daily Observer, September 4th 2017

Word.

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As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Fish Outta Water, With Grace, and Musical Youth). All Rights Reserved. Do not re-use content without permission and credit. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

 

 

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Congrats to the ANYC…Belatedly

Belated congratulations to the Antigua and Barbuda National Youth Choir on being joint winners of the Commonwealth Choir Competition. The sing-off was held in 2016 and the winners announced in March 2017. Their entry was Unity written by John Hewlett and Dr. George Roberts.

According to this Observer article, the choir will be flown to London in 2018 to record the winning song. Observer NYC

Congrats to them…belatedly. So that you don’t have to depend on me to keep up with the ABNYC, like their page.

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Antiguans and Barbudans Awarded

Here, Wadadli Pen will be celebrating award wins (including sometimes award nominations and long and shortlisting, and  accolades received) by Antiguan and Barbudan writers. It came about because I’d bump in to laudatory accomplishments (beyond publishing) but couldn’t figure out where to put them. The Antiguan and Barbuda Writings pages are bibliographies, and neither the Reviews page nor the journal publications page were right. So, here we go. Please note, this page is a work-in-progress. As with the other named sections, it will be updated somewhere between when I find updates and when I find the time to post them. I’m not ranking the awards at this point (some are local, some regional, some international, some prestigious, some not so much…I’m just adding them as I can). No omissions or errors (and there are plenty, no doubt) are intentional. As always if you have information that will help me flesh out the content, let me know. Conversely, if you wish to be removed, no problem, just let me know that too.

Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Challenge wins are not listed here but if you want to see the winners of that in-house prize through the years, go here.

2021 – 

Ripped Bodice Awards for Excellence in Romantic Fiction (2020) – Rilzy Adams, Go Deep. Adams has also been nominated for other books and other industry awards – Swoonies, Black Girls Who Write, and Rebel Women Lit readers choice among them (making it on to short lists in some cases).

Wadadli Pen 2020 winner Andre J. P. Warner’s winning story Bright Future for Tomorrow was awarded best short fiction in the first Rebel Women Lit Caribbean Readers Awards. Andre wins RWLWadadli Pen founder and coordinator Joanne C. Hillhouse was a RWL CRA honoree Joanne honoured RWL. There were several other nominees from the Wadadli Pen family and from Antigua and Barbuda; full list of nominees can be found here.

2020 –

Musical Youth named a Kirkus Reviews top 100 indie book of the year; also a top teen/young adult and top romance novel.

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s short story ‘Vincent’ was one of 21 stories long listed for the Brooklyn Caribbean Literary Festival Elizabeth Nunez Award for Writers in the Caribbean

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was longlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for the story ‘Shedding’

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots won the 2020 Bocas Prize for his poetry collection Epiphaneia

The Directorate of Gender Affairs held its first ever Women of Wadadli Awards – a number of artists were recipients – Heather Doram (visual artist) for Culture, Noreen Phillips for Fashion, Wadadli Pen founder and coordinator and author Joanne C. Hillhouse for Literature, Colleen Simpson (author of A Likkle Bit a Dis & a Likkle Bit a Dat) for Culinary Arts, dramatist, photographer, writer, and educator Zahra Airall for Fine Arts, Wadadli Pen partner and patron and a writer and dramatist in her own right Barbara Arrindell as a Change Maker, Marion Byron for Music, Mickel Brann for Media/Journalism, and Mako Williams, who is also a visual artist, for Science and Technology. Details in this WoW article in Observer

New Daughters of Africa edited by Margaret Busby nominated for an NAACP Image award in the literature category for fiction – it includes the short story ‘Evening Ritual’ by Joanne C. Hillhouse

2019 –

Richard Georges wins a fellowship to the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study – Georges is Trinidad born and lives in the BVI but he also has Antiguan roots


Winners of Flow Mobile Film Competition (Antigua and Barbuda) –

The top three winners in category 12-16 years
1st Sontee’ Beazer – “Independence”
2nd Jontae Cornelius -“What Independence Day Means to Me”
3rd Kaleb Kidane Hatton – “What does Independence mean to me”.

The top three winners from the category 17- 30 years old
1st Moses Wiltshire – “My Independence”
2nd Bernella Vidal – “What Independence Means To Me”
3rd Dalisha Spencer – “Independence”

The top three winners in the 31+ category
1st Romeo “Kulcha D” Reid – “Kulcha D Independence”
2nd Laune Isaac – “Reflections On Independence
3rd Colin John-Jenkins -“What Independence means to me”

CSSDF.jpgThe Antigua and Barbuda contingent at the Caribbean Secondary Schools’ Drama Festival won several awards: Best Production, Best Original Screenplay, The Aston Cooke Award for directing (Zahra Airall), Most Innovative Set Design, Best Sound Effects, Best Lighting Design, Best Actress (Khadelia Williams), and Best Overall Contingent (for their cooperation, interaction, conduct, and willingness to participate in activities throughout the festival).

Producer Mitzi Allen, and actresses Heather Doram and Julie Hewlett are three of four women in film award recipients at the Motion Picture Association of Antigua-Barbuda’s International Film Festival

Wadadli Pen 2018 winner Kyle Christian becomes a National Youth Awards winner in the literary arts category.

The PEN America Literary Awards Longlist The Circuit: A Tennis Odyssey by Rowan Ricardo Phillips longlisted for the PEN/ESPN AWARD FOR LITERARY SPORTS WRITING ($5,000) To honor a nonfiction book on the subject of sports published in 2018

Rowan Ricard Philips receives the Nicolás Guillén Outstanding Book Award for 2015’s Heaven

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was longlisted for the OCM Bocas Prize for his poetry collection Giant.

2018 – 

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was highly commended for the Forward Prize for his poetry collection Giant

2017 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was short listed for the Forward Prize for best first collection for his poetry collection Make Us All Islands

Ashley Bryan – Newbery Honor, Coretta Scott King Honor for writing and illustration, Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan

Althea Romeo Mark awarded the Arts and Science Poetry Prize for poems published in POEZY 21:Antologia Festivaluluiinternational Noptile De Poezie De Curtea De Arges, Curtea De Arges, Romania

Alexis Andrews wins the Donald Gosling Award for best television or film contribution at the Maritime Media Awards for Vanishing SailAlexis

Joanne C. Hillhouse nominated for the Astrid Lindgren prize

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s children’s picture book With Grace selected for the USVI Governor’s Summer Reading Challenge

Jamaica Kincaid is announced as winner of the Dan David Prize for being “one of the most important and influential writers today”. This prize is administered by Tel Aviv University

ink-awardSpilling Ink receives the Antigua and Barbuda National Youth Awards literary arts award

2016 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots won the Marvin E Williams prize from The Caribbean Writer for ‘X’ and was shortlisted for the Small Axe Poetry prize for ‘Darkening/Freeport’

Ashley Bryan – short-listed for the Kirkus Prize and received a Newberry Honor

Anisfield-Wolf book award + Griffin Poetry Prize for Heaven by Rowan Ricardo Philips

Joy Lawrence awarded Antigua and Barbuda’s OH – Officer of the Most Precious Order of Princely Heritage – during the Independence Day Ceremonial Parade

Tammi Browne-Bannister wins the Marguerite Cobb-McKay Prize from The Caribbean Writer

Chrys-ann Ambrose receives an Indie Author Legacy Award (non-fiction) for her book Operation Game-Plan. Held for the first time in 2016, the award was designed to specifically celebrate non-fiction literacy geared towards the promotion of social awareness, education and personal transformation

Zahra Airall wins Antigua and Barbuda’s National Youth Award in the literary arts category

2015 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was shortlisted for the Wasifiri New Writing Prize – Poetry for ‘Bush Tea’

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is a Guggenheim Fellow

Angelica O’Donoghue wins National Youth Award Young Journalist Award and Asha Graham wins the NYA Literary Arts Award

Zahra Airall and the team from Antigua Girls High School win awards for costuming, lighting, acting, originality, writing, directing, and overall execution at the Antigua and Barbuda Secondary Schools Drama Festival

Antigua and Barbuda win at the Caribbean Secondary Schools Drama Festival – Best Supporting Actress (Onalie Lares), Most Promising Actress (Queenela Williams), Most Outstanding Performer (Jianna Minott)

Lady of Parham, a David Edgecombe play set in Antigua and Barbuda, is short listed for the Guyana Prize for Literature Caribbean Awards for Best Drama

Alexis Andrews wins the People’s Choice Award for Best Documentary at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival

Alexis Andrews’ film Vanishing Sails wins the Caribbean Spirit Award for Best Overall Feature at Canada’s Caribbean Tales awards

Joanne C. Hillhouse receives the Caribbean Writer Flash Fiction Prize for the story ‘When we Danced’.

Dorbrene O’Marde long-listed for the Bocas Prize for the Short Shirt biography Nobody Go Run Me

2014 –

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s Commonwealth Short Story submission ‘Amelia at Devil’s Bridge’ was selected for publication in Pepperpot: Best New Stories from the Caribbean – consisting entirely of brand-new stories by authors living in the region, gathered from among the very best entries to the Commonwealth Short Story Prize from islands throughout the Caribbean

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Before Columbus Foundation Book Award for See Now Then 

Melissa Gomez and Cinque Productions’ film Silent Music wins Best Documentary feature at the Maine Deaf Film Festival

Althea Prince is named by the Harbourfront Centre as a Canadian Literary Pioneer

with_grace-3d-standingJoanne C. Hillhouse’s fairytale ‘With Grace’ earns honourable mention in the Desi Writers Lounge fiction contest The story goes on to be published as a children’s picture book released in December 2016.

Tim Hector Award

Leonard Tim Hector Memorial Award to Joanne C. Hillhouse for contribution to journalism, literary arts, and youth development in Antigua and Barbuda

Accepting Burt Award trophyJoanne C. Hillhouse’s manuscript Musical Youth is first runner-up/second placed for the Burt Award for teen/young adult Caribbean fiction at the Bocas Lit Fest in Trinidad Musical Youth the book is released later in the year under the regional Caribbean Reads imprint

2013 –

Rowan Ricardo Philips is a Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award winner for poetry + NAACP Image Award finalist for Outstanding Literary Work, Poetry + PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry winner + Whiting Award winner, for The Ground

silent-music-poster.pngMelissa Gomez’s film Silent Music wins the Audience Choice Award at the Toronto Deaf Film and Arts Festival

Tanya Evanson is Poet of Honour at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word & the Sheri-D Wilson Golden Beret Award

Glen Toussaint and Linisa George are National Youth Award winners for literary arts 

Brenda Lee Browne named as a finalist for the Hollick Arvon Caribbean Writers Prize administered by the Bocas Literary Festival

PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award & Whiting Writers’ Award to Rowan Ricardo Philips for The Ground

‘Amelia at Devil’s Bridge’ by Joanne C. Hillhouse is short listed for the Small Axe fiction prize.

Dorbrene receives Calypso Composer prize from the Wadadli Calypso Association

2012 –

Linisa George is selected as Antigua and Barbuda’s representative to the Poetry Parnassus festival in London, an Olympics adjacent event which included a representative from each participating country; her selection (Brown Girl in the Ring) was subsequently published in a collection called The World Record

Althea Prince is shortlisted as one of Canadian Immigrants Top 25 Immigrants

Ashley Bryan is awarded the Coretta Scott-King Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Ethnic & Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable

Caribbean Canadian Literary Award for Outstanding Contribution to Caribbean Canadian Literature – from A Different Booklist, Toronto, to Althea Prince

Linisa George

Linisa George – National Youth Award for literary arts; the group she co-founded with Zahra Airall, Thomasine Greenaway, and Greschen Edwards (Women of Antigua) also claims a prize for Activism

silent-music-1Melissa Gomez’s Silent Music wins Best Documentary at the Caribbean Tales film festival

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s short story ‘Genevieve’ short listed for the Small Axe fiction prize

Mary Geo Quinn receives a Queen Elizabeth ll Diamond Jubilee Award for Education and Development of the Literary Arts

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist for poetry, for The Ground

2011 –

Tameka Jarvis-George wins the National Youth Awards lit arts award

Reggae Film Festival Awards – Tameka Jarvis-George receives a JFA Honour Award as director of short film Dinner at the Jamaica International Reggae Film Festival.

Iyaba Ibo Mandingo wins Yale University’s Martin Luther King Birthday Invitational Slam (his seventh such win; he is also a repeat winner of the Connecticut Grand Slam championship)

Kimolisa Mings wins Independence Literary Awards – poetry and overall (Antigua and Barbuda)

Shakeema Edwards (a Wadadli Pen alum) third placed (adult story category) Independence Literary Awards (Antigua and Barbuda)

Ryerson University Faculty Award-the Kay Livingstone Award-to Althea Prince

Brenda Lee Browne is awarded National Youth Award (Antigua and Barbuda) Lifetime Achievement Award

Caribbean Writer Award (2)Joanne C. Hillhouse receives the David Hough Literary Prize from the Caribbean Writer.

Joanne C. Hillhouse receives a certificate of recognition from JCI West Indies as one of Ten Outstanding Young Persons in the region.

2010 –

Ashley Bryan – Golden Kite Award for nonfiction, Ashley Bryan: Words to My Life’s Song

Redemption of Paradise by Dr. Noel Howell wins three prizes at the Jamaica Reggae Film Festival – including Best Caribbean Film and Best Actress (Macka Diamond of Jamaica)

Hazra Medica is named a Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest finalist for Ode to a Night in Ale

Education, Leadership, and Community Service Award – the Antigua Girls’ High School Alumni Association of North America, New York, USA – to Althea Prince

Dorbrene O’Marde receives the Friend of the Arts Sunshine Award

Zahra Airall and Linisa George win National Youth Awards (Antigua and Barbuda) for their promotion of the literary and theatrical arts

Rev. Denise Smith-Lewis wins poetry and story prize; and Shakeema Edwards wins the story prize in the 12 and 17 age category (also a runner-up, poetry and spoken word) in the Antigua and Barbuda Independence Literary Arts Competition

2009 –

Elizabeth Abbott’s Sugar: A Bittersweet History is short listed for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

Althea Romeo-Mark is awarded the Marguerite Cobb McKay prize by The Caribbean Writer for the short story ‘Bitterleaf’ which had been published in 2008, Volume 22

Ashley Bryan receives the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award  for contribution to American children’s literature and the Wilder medal

Rev. Denise Smith-Lewis wins poetry prize in the Antigua and Barbuda Independence Literary Arts Competition

Mary Geo Quinn wins Independence Literary Arts Competition Award for adult fiction

2008 –

Ashley Bryan receives the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his book Let it Shine

Hazra Medica’s short story ‘The Banana Stains’ is Highly Commended in the Commonwealth Short Story competition

Ashley Bryan is named a Literary Lion by the New York Public Library alongside Salman Rushdie, Nora Ephron, and Edward Albee

Floree Williams (now Whyte) receives the (Antigua and Barbuda) National Youth Award for achievement in the literary arts; Zahra Airall also receives an NYA in this year

Howard and Mitzi Allen receives National Youth Awards as Pioneers in Filmmaking

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAV-Monologues literary prize to Shakeema Edwards from Women of Antigua; who that year also wins the Dancing Nude in the Moonlight Next Chapter contest sponsored by the Best of Books

Joanne C. Hillhouse received the Michael and Marilee Fairbanks International Fellowship to participate in the Breadloaf Writers Conference.

2007 –

National Awards – Officer of the Most Precious Order of Princely Heritage, OH – Dr. Bille Dyer & Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of the Nation, KCN – Keithlyn Smith 

Althea Prince

Althea Prince receives the Antigua and Barbuda International Literary Festival Award for Excellence in the Literary Arts

2006 –

Ashley Bryan – U.S. nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award (the highest recognition for creators of children’s books)

Carolyn Providence is nominated for the Best Spoken Word album at the National Underground Spoken Word and Poetry Awards.

Vivian Michael and teen novelist Akilah Jardine receive (Antigua and Barbuda) National Youth Awards for achievement in the literary arts; Joanne C. Hillhouse is named honourable mention.

Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda’s Jubilee Award for Outstanding Contributions and Achievements in the Field of Arts and Culture to Althea Prince

The Marguerite Cobb McKay Literary Prize from The Caribbean Writer  to Edgar O. Lake

2005 –

Ashley Bryan – the Atlanta Literary Festival was named for him and he also received the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion from the Fay B. Kaigler Children’s Book Festival

The Marguerite Cobb McKay Literary Prize from The Caribbean Writer & The Leonard Tim Hector Annual Lecture Memorial Award from the Leonard Tim Hector Memorial Committee to Edgar O. Lake

2004 –

Ashley Bryan receives the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his book Beautiful Blackbird

Joanne C. Hillhouse, Joy Lawrence, Sylvanus Barnes, and others received a UNESCO Honour Award for contribution to literacy and the literary arts in Antigua and Barbuda

2002 –

Motion won the 2002 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation National Poetry Face-Off competition.

Mary Geo Quinn Highly Commended for her short story ‘Joe’, an entry for the Commonwealth short story prize

2001 –

East Midland Arts New Writers Award to Brenda Lee Browne

2000 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Prix Femina étranger for My Brother

Arnold Prince receives a Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Rhode Island

Mary Geo Quinn receives the King of Redonda literary award for her memoir Recollections

1999 –

Lannan Literary Award for fiction to Jamaica Kincaid

1998 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for Ashley Bryan’s ABC of American Poetry

1997 –

Jamaica Kincaid’s The Autobiography of My Mother is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction (USA), the PEN Faulkner Award , and Boston Book Review Fisk Fiction Prize; also a National Book Award nominee for My Brother

PEN American Writers Fund Award to Edgar O. Lake

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for The Autobiography of My Mother

1995 –

Althea Romeo Mark’s story ‘Easter Sunday’ wins the Stauffacher English Short Story Competition/Switzerland

1992 –

Joanne C. Hillhouse second placed in the Rick James Ensemble One Act Play Competition with the play ‘Barman’s Blues’; Zahra Airall wins a prize in that same competition as the Youngest person to enter

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour award from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for All Night, All Day: a Child’s First Book of African American Spirituals

Jamaica Kincaid claims the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Award

1991 –

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre “CHOICE AWARD” for children’s book: How The East-Pond Got Its Flowers – Althea Prince

1988 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour award from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for What a Morning! The Christmas Story in Black Spirituals

1987 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Author honor from the Coretta Scott King Awards for his book Lion and the Ostrich Chicks and Other African Folk Tales

1986 –

Mary Geo Quinn receives an Eastern Caribbean Authors of Excellence Award

Ashley Bryan – Coretta Scott King Honor for writing and illustration, Lion and the Ostrich Chicks and Other African Folk Tales

1985 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship for Fiction

1984 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award for fiction

Shortlisted for the PEN Faulkner Award for At the Bottom of the River – Jamaica Kincaid

1983 –

Ashley Bryan wins an Illustrator honor from the Coretta Scott King Awards for I’m Going to Sing: Black American Spirituals

Jamaica Kincaid’s At the Bottom of the River wins the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and is nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award

1981 –

Ashley Bryan – Coretta Scott King Award for illustration, Beat the Story Drum, Pum-Pum

1979 –

Alexander Sideris Fine Arts Award to Mali Olatunji for his image ‘Solitude in Fall’ which can be seen in The Art of Mali Olatunji by Mali Olatunji and Paget Henry

1974 –

Althea Romeo Mark’s poem ‘Old No-Teeth Mama’ wins the poetry award at Cuyahoga Community Writers Conference

1969 –

Quill & Scroll Award, Fort Benjamin Harrison Journalism Award, Indiana to Edgar O. Lake

1934 –

Roy H. S. Dublin’s Tomorrow’s Blossoms, first published in 1934 to commemorate the tercentenary year of the colonization of Antigua and the centenary year of emancipation, is awarded the King’s Medal

Date unknown, unsure, unconfirmed –

Althea Romeo Mark wins a scholarship to the Breadloaf Writers’ Conference

PEN Award for his journalistic work to Leonard Tim Hector

***

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Antiguan and Barbudan writer Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure; also a freelance writer, editor, writing coach and workshop facilitator). All Rights Reserved. If you like the content here follow or recommend the blog, also, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. Thank you.

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Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery