Tag Archives: linisa george

Reading Room and Gallery XVl

This page is for sharing links to things of interest around the internet. It’ll be sporadically updated; so, come back from time to time. For the previous reading rooms (1, 11, 111, 1v, v, v1 , v11, v111, 1x, x, x1, x11, x111, x1v, xv), click the links or use the search feature to the right, to the right.

VISUALS

No this is not just an excuse to post the Formation video. This is, as all links in this section, a how they made it post. And this is the it that they made – so much to unpack with the visuals (video directed by Melinda Matsoukas with footage from 2014 documentary That B.E.A.T. directed by Abteen Bagheri) and as I said on my facebook, I’m kind of digging politicalBey.

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“What are you going to do with this kind of thing?” – initial response to Dorothea Lange’s street photography during America’s Great Depression (sidenote: for more art on the Great Depression you can’t go wrong with the film The Grapes of Wrath and the book it’s based on)

POETRY

“Poems for me often come in a flash—and then there is the intense crafting that begins in getting at the poem that is hidden within that first draft.” – Jacqueline Bishop

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‘To add to the insult, my father reminded me that “Tonto” means dumb-dumb in Spanish. Perhaps I became a writer the very night I became an Indian dressed as a fake Indian named Dumb-Dumb.’ – Natalie Diaz on Hand-me-down Halloween

BIOGRAPHIES

‘”He wrote back to me saying ‘Michael Anthony, promise me you will never write another poem. But the short story has promise,'” recalls Anthony in remarkably good humour.’ Read more on this Trinidadian author.

BLOGGED

“The ballet that inspired the maswork is about the inevitability of death (the title gives that away, right?). It’s a classic Minshall move to have taken this exemplary work of European ‘high’ culture and translated it via two traditional Carnival characters, the moko jumbie and the Dame Lorraine. And through a minimalist but rigorously considered form, a deceptively simple performance by the masquerader, a touch of self-awareness and self-parody (it’s a burly dude in drag, after all), to have made something that his audience can plainly delight in, while feeling the little emotional quiver of recognition that this is an artist’s elegy for his art.” – Nicholas Laughlin in a social media discussion quoted on Annie Paul’s blog re Peter Minshall’s controversial 2016 King costume The Dying Swan – Ras Najinski in Drag as Anna Pavlova in The Dying Swan

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“It really does take me back to childhood; hearing (but not listening to) the weather report at the end of the 7pm evening news, sitting at the dining table with my brother eating supper of bread and… (bread and peanut butter or sardines or potted meat or corned beef or fried bologna or cheese or guava jelly or maybe just butter.. but always bread) and drinking ovaltine from my Minnie Mouse mug. The bread would be wood-bread (forever the BEST bread ever to be made!) and the ovaltine would be hot, sweetened with sugar (or condensed milk if there wasn’t any sugar) and creamy with milk. The adults would usually be talking about any and everything – politics, the number of times the “current lock off” that day (power outages were very common then), the happenings at school or work; they never seemed much interested in the weather report except when a hurricane was about to hit, then they weren’t interested in anything but the weather report.” – reminiscences… at SimplyNatural blog.

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“It appears that the local writer needs to begin to consider publishing her work in regional and international presses. Such an endeavor, though daunting, will begin to establish the readership necessary to establish regional relevance as an author and then hopefully territorial significance in the landscape of our local literature. Poets need to start publishing their poetry in established online and print journals, novelists need to start publishing short stories, and so on. The obvious benefit to the individual is that arduous process of creation and revision sharpens her skills and hones her craft, meaning that when the next great Virgin Islands novel is published it can be a text that stands up to and against the contemporary novels of the region.” – Richard Georges, BVI

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“Everything you hear me saying on this record is at least the fourth or fifth draft. I would write a verse and then rewrite it and rewrite it. I don’t sit down and write a song, and then slam down the phone like, ‘We got another one!’ and pop some champagne. It’s like if someone’s writing a novel: You write a series of drafts.” – Black Thought of the Roots as quoted in this posting about the greatest hip hop band of all time.

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NON FICTION

‘“Naipaul instructed Theroux in writing. He rejected anything false or showy or mannered; he insisted on clarity and simplicity and hard work. “The truth is messy,” he told Theroux. “It is not pretty. Writing must reflect that. Art must tell the truth.” He decided that a writer’s duty is to be wholly honest to himself, without compromise, and to tell the truth as he sees it, never mind the consequences.’ – Jeremy Taylor writing on V. S. Naipaul

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“My face is a mama’s face to my daughter. She holds my face and says Mommy, you’re pretty. My husband has only known me with this face. My co-workers have only known me with this face. I have many friends who know me only with this face. It is a good face. Next year will be half a life with this particular face.” – Latoya Jordan

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“With this heightened sensitivity to the Caribbean space and spirit, the ethos of Plantation, Kamau exists as a kind of sage, but in a society that still has not been able to consistently decide what to do with him, he can be more accurately likened to a figure in Roman law and society, known as the homo sacer, a status that may fall upon oath breakers as well as persons who threatened the hegemony in that society.” – Vladimir Lucien writing on Kamau Braithwaite

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Okay, so this isn’t riveting prose; but it is riveting research into youth career selection among a select group of students in Antigua and Barbuda, and revealing in what it says about the disconnect between available subjects and career goals and national agenda. Give it a read.

***

‘We run into an old lady.
“Children, tell me, can I drink milk from my cow?”
We look down at the ground, we have our orders—collect data, but don’t interact with the local population.
Finally the driver speaks up. “Grandma, how old are you?”
“Oh, more than eighty. Maybe more than that, my documents got burned during the war.”
“Then drink all you want.”
I understood, not right away, but after a few years, that we all took part in that crime, in that conspiracy.’ – Voices from Chernobyl by Svetlana Alexievich #riveting

WRITERS ON PUBLISHING

“Compelling reasons to carry your book include you (1) being a local author; (2) having strong publicity backing your book; or (3) proving that you will bring in the readers/buyers. If you don’t have any of these three things, you’re a tough sell.” Brooke Warner writing on why your book isn’t being carried in bookstores  

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“By industry standards, I suppose I am a failed author. Since I started writing for young readers in 2000, only three of my thirty stories have been published traditionally. I turned to self-publishing as my only recourse, and now face the contempt of those who see self-publishing as a mere exercise in vanity.” – Zetta Elliott on Black Authors and Self-Publishing

WRITERS ON WRITING CREATIVES ON CREATING

“My friend James Patterson is a big believer in the importance of a great outline. These days, in fact, the outline may be the main thing he actually writes, while he turns over the actual writing to his stable of co-authors. This is how he manages to turn out three or four novels a year, and still fit in a few holes of golf most days. Still, James Patterson believes in hard work. Seven days a week, in his case—though Mr. Patterson doesn’t call writing work, because he loves it so much. This is a man with an unmistakable passion for what he does.” – Joyce Maynard after taking James Patterson’s masterclass. Two comments: 1, I always wondered how people churned out three to four novels a year. Mystery solved. 2, I won’t sign off on drafting outlines and leaving the actual writing to co-authors but I do like the belief in “hard work” and the “unmistakable passion”.

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“Once I am done with a draft of a chapter, I am the only person who can read it. Pages are full of half sentences, doodles, arrows pointing here and there. Then, I complete sentences; I fix the grammar, and make the images understandable. Then that chapter is ready for an editor.” – How I Write My Graphic Novels: A Breakdown from Ozge Samanci

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“To be honest, when I started with the pthalo blue background, I intended to let the wispy bits of the feathers fade into the blue … but then I mixed up a nice buttery colour and I just got carried away cutting away the negative shapes around the wreath shape.
That left me with a blue wreath floating on a light background. So then I got the idea to add a pattern, to help integrate the different elements of the image  … and I started with circles. How about a wreath floating, on a stoney riverbed?” – Donna Grandin as she creates.

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“The other thing I would say is if you feel safe in the area that you’re working in you’re not working in the right area…go a little bit out of your depth…” – David Bowie

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“Then one day I realized something. I realized that in the midst of all of the colourful leaves, there was the occasional stem covered in tiny white flowers, like little starbursts. I had seen the stems with the buds before, but for some reason I never noticed the flowers.” – Donna Grandin

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“If your handsome, muscular, confident hero strides assertively and briskly into the dusty, spare, lamplit room, you’ve got a problem with excessive description—specifically, with the overuse of adjectives and adverbs.”  – Joseph Bates writing in Writer’s Digest the Five Cardinal Sins of Description

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“A concert pianist practices twenty or thirty hours for every hour she’s on stage. That’s after she’s completed years of lessons and practice to master her craft well enough to be on stage in the first place. A champion athlete trains long and hard to prepare herself for an event that may last seconds. Everyone expects this of them, the athlete and pianist expect it of themselves. No one expects to succeed – or get paid – for their first effort. Except writers. Writing is a craft and a skill that requires constant work, constant practice to maintain. I took the book back down off the shelf.” – KeVin K (Kevin Killiany) blogging at NovelSpaces

INTERVIEWS

“Being laid off, having to live off the bare essentials didn’t detour him, as a matter of fact he didn’t mind at all. It was almost as if he was liberated and being forced into his calling. Attending writing workshops, classes, using his experiences, he has built characters that are so much like him and his experiences and characters that are nothing like him at all. He’s taken his readers from small country towns to international locations that would be any traveler’s dream. Speaking not just as an author but also as a fan I have seen his books grow and evolve; novels that aren’t just about sex or drama but novels that are meant to tell stories. To this day he still goes to writing classes and gets excited about taking notes and learning new things.” – re fAntiguan Eric Jerome Dickey

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“Let’s take ‘Where Did Our Love Go’ by The Supremes. This is a hypothetical example, but, to me, the most important part of that song is the tenor sax part in the background. So while everyone will sing the lead — ‘Baby, baby where did our love go’ — I’ll start singing … the saxophone part that’s buried in the mix somewhere. I have no idea why [it is] that the small nuances of a song are more attractive to me than the actual song. [But] this definitely explains why I have zero pop sensibility.” – ?uestlove of The Roots on NPR. Listen to the full interview.

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“Soul II Soul was a collective and formerly a sound system. This is how we started. Making music together came about during our days as a sound system. Most traditional sound systems make their own music, which is what led to the genesis of the whole Soul II Soul forming. You can really relate back to songs like “Jazzie’s Groove” and “Fairplay” to get a full understanding of what we were trying to do musically. What I tried to do on the first album was to explain what Soul II Soul was all about. Technically, Soul II Soul is a sound system rather than a band per se, which is why we have a rotating lineup of different singers. This goes back to the origins of the old sound systems as well, because in a sound system, you would also have many different MCs or DJs. All of these things combined to form Soul II Soul.” – Jazzie B., British artiste with Antiguan roots reflects on Soul II Soul’s breakthrough album.

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“It starts while I’m in the final editing phases of a novel—that’s when I begin thinking about what I’d like to work on next. I consider what would be fun and what excites me. Once I have a clear sense of where I want to go, I write a quick first draft, kind of vomit-style. This doesn’t take more than a couple months, and it’s usually a short manuscript, not more than 60,000 words. I let that draft sit for a while, then go through and hack out bits I hate and fancy up the bits I like. Once I’ve done this a few times and feel I’ve hit a wall, I send the manuscript to a couple readers. I incorporate their feedback and make more revisions and then hire a freelance editor. Right now I am working with Diane Glazman for my next novel, Spore Girl. Then I begin shopping the manuscript around. I went with a small press for Destroying Angel, and I hope to sign with an agent and release Spore Girl with a larger publisher.” – Missy Wilkinson on doubt, writing, and which book she’d like to live in.

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“Talent is the tiniest part of a writer’s makeup. What counts is perseverance, good friends (writers and non-writers), a tough skin to ignore what others think about you–which is none of your business anyway–and a little bit of luck, which will help you on those days when you are down and thinking, ‘Why on earth am I doing this to myself?'” – JAmerican writer Geoffrey Philp on his writing journey and tools.

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“…there’s no money in it…” – Linisa George, Antiguan and Barbudan writer, arts and social activist, and former Wadadli Pen judge, on her various arts projects. Listen to the full interview.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, Fish Outta Water, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Mailbox -Black Girl in the Ring: That’s what’s up!

Have you checked out the BGR mag, as yet? You’re a couple of years late since the 2013 re-launch of the site. But never too late. BGR stands for Brown Girl in the Ring, a poem with long legs (because, yes, it has travelled far and continues to make tracks). Out of writer, past Wadadli Pen judge, and BGR mag founder BGR2Linisa George’s struggle with image and identity, the poem, Brown Girl in the Ring, became popular on the Antiguan and Barbudan stage. It was part of When a Woman Moans (a Vagina Monologues styled production by Women of Antigua, the very group that brought the Eve Ensler play to the local stage). It has since been referenced in my book Musical Youth, which deals with some of the very themes of colour and self-acceptance explored in the poem; it was also Antigua and Barbuda’s contribution to the Poetry Parnassus which coincided with the Olympics, and The World Record publication that followed. When I edited the Antigua and Barbuda edition of Tongues of the Ocean, it was one of the local pieces I specifically requested for inclusion; and from that posting, the poem caught the eye of the folks behind the Bahamas’ Shakespeare in Paradise festival, who included it in their 2015 production.

Talk about a ripple effect; this poem certainly has that. And none knows that better than George. Here’s what she shared in  a release at the time of the self-described “online lifestyle website”‘s re-launch in 2013 (like I said better late than never).

BGR3

“BGRmag…was conceptualized from the autobiographical poem ‘Brown Girl In The Ring’ written by Caribbean poet Linisa George. The poem, which is featured in the London 2012 Olympic poetry anthology ‘The World Record’, chronicles a young woman’s journey to self-acceptance as she battled the desire to be of a lighter complexion, brown girl, to the joy she ultimately discovers in just being herself; The Black Girl In The Ring.

Through lifestyle articles on career, sex, love, art and fashion, just to name a few, BGRmag hopes to challenge [challenges] BGRs to recognise their beauty and uniqueness both inside and out. From the stay-at-home mother to the farmer, from the lawyer to the doctor, from the philanthropists to the teacher, from the DJ to the artist, attention will be focused [focuses] on the diverse and complex experiences and lifestyles of black women globally, and the life lessons to be learned from their journey.

Linisa George was born in Guyana, but has been living in Antigua since the age of 4, and is very forthcoming about her experiences as a young girl struggling to maneuvre through a maze of self-doubt and low self-esteem. Now in her early 30s, she created BGRmag to spotlight the many facets and accomplishments of black women, mindful not to rank one achievement over the other. By highlighting the diverse stories of black women, BGRmag will provide [provides] another outlet and opportunity for young girls to be inspired and motivated to carve their own future through self- discovery and acceptance.

The prototype for BGRmag was developed through Linisa’s personal blog, previously known as Motives ‘n Thoughts, which was re-vamped in January 2012 under the new name; blackgirlinthering.blogspot.com. The rebrand in 2012 propelled the idea of BGRmag into action, birthing the …comprehensive and informative website, as an alternative to the stereo-typical and many times dangerous media projection of black women. The website isn’t about promoting division; rather it will focus its attention on celebrating that which gets lost in the midst of noise. BGRmag will reveal itself to be a creative vision to share extraordinary stories.
Readers can expect to be [are] the fly on the wall as BGRs share their unique experiences that have shaped their lives for the better. Informative articles will dispute thoughts and insight debates. Contributors will interview and articulate stories that will compel BGRmag readers to re-examine their views on what it means to be a black girl or woman. The online magazine will [does] not reinvent the wheel, but rather will pay[s] close attention to refining what is already in existence. You can expect BGRmag to add[s] their distinctive voice to the market of magazines and publications that continually uplift black women. Black Girls In The Ring are fierce, fabulous and ready for their close-ups.

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Editorial Notes:

BGRmag’s vision: To celebrate the accomplishments of black women at all levels of society, and foster the unique voices of black girls in the ring.

BGRmag’s motto: ‘Define Yourself’

BGRmag’s Pledge: Strong. Powerful. Loving. Beautiful. Active. Innovative. Humble. Vibrant. Comedic. Serious. Daring. Loud. Ambitious. Indifferent. Aggressive. Trendsetter. Sister. Mother. Wife. Friend. Lover. Stylish. BGRs are genius individuals.

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For General Questions, Editorial-Related Comments and Questions, Feedback and Suggestions, Event & Press Release Submissions, email us at blackgirlinthering@gmail.com

BGR

I’m about two years too late posting this so don’t wait another minute. Check out BGR mag and define yourself.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Fish Outta Water, and Musical Youth). All Rights Reserved. Seriously, a lot of time, energy, love and frustration goes in to researching and creating content for this site; please don’t just take it up just so without even a please, thank you or an ah-fu-she-subben (credit). If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

 

 

 

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Reading Room XV

This page is for sharing links to things of interest around the internet. It’ll be sporadically updated; so, come back from time to time. For the previous reading rooms, use the search feature to the right, to the right.

FICTION

“So, Damian spent his time climbing trees in our backyard, acting like those TV monkeys. He mimicked them: jumping on me like those babies did their mommies. It’s cute when they do it. But when he did it . . . well, things broke. My arm, leg, and, once, he yanked so hard on me I herniated a spinal disc.” – Read Mindy Halleck’s full story.

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‘“Did you pack a snack and a sweater?”

Charlisa pointed to her backpack. “They’re in my satchel,” she said, waiting to see if Sister Rita would notice she’d learned the word.’ –
Read the full award winning story by Brenda Scott Royce here.

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I’m putting this in the fiction category though Moko’s Firing the Canon includes visual arts and poetry as well, because I mostly talk about the fiction here (you can and should read the whole issue though).

VISUAL

A new website, http://www.barrelstories.org launched in January following the successful Commonwealth Shorts’ film by Lisa Harewood, Auntie. Lisa’s idea is for the site to encourage conversations about the effects, both positive and negative, of migrants leaving their children behind in the care of others. It’s a place where we can listen to personal accounts of parents, children and carers.  You can also contribute your own story; to do so, email to submit@barrelstories.org

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“A definite powerful conversation piece, the mural sends a strong message to our society and demonstrates what can be accomplished when youths are empowered and encouraged to affect change.” Read more about this mural, created by youths of Antigua and Barbuda.

WRITERS ON WRITING

“Although you the writer are indeed doing the writing, your narrator is the one telling the story. And that narrator is not you. Sure, your narrator could be a slightly more neurotic or jealous version of you, or someone very different from you, or somewhere in between, but he or she is not you. Yep, even when you’re using first person.” – Janelle Drumwright

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“While too much detail and description can bog down the pace of a story, the reader still needs adequate description to frame the story.” – Zetta Brown, introducing How to Create a Fictional Setting by Michelle Gwynn Jones.

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“Very often your dialogue can become stilted unless you are a good listener, and if you listen you’ll discover that people interrupt each other.” – Maeve Binchy – Secrets from the Writing Club

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“Making people believe the unbelievable is no trick; it’s work. … Belief and reader absorption come in the details: An overturned tricycle in the gutter of an abandoned neighborhood can stand for everything. Or a broken billboard. Or weeds growing in the cracks of a library’s steps. Of course, none of this means a lot without characters the reader cares about (and sometimes characters—‘bad guys’—the reader is rooting against).” – Stephen King, read more at Writer’s Digest.

BLOG

From Antigua to London to the US to the Bahamas…Linisa George’s Brown Girl in a Ring is indeed well-travelled. In this post, a Bahamian actress reflects on performing it in the country’s annual Shakespeare Festival. Check out what she had to say about the experience in this posting – You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do on her blog The Little Lady’s Diary.

AUTHORS ON PUBLISHING

“Most writers I know continue to work on their submissions for years, even after acceptance, feeling they can always improve. So don’t get egotistical about what you want to stubbornly believe is your final draft. Accept that most writing is never final, even amongst the best.” Read more of Ralph Monday’s article : The More Lines Cast Into the Water, the More Fish That Will Bite (and Other Tips on Submitting to Lit Mags)

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“Never give up” plus *bonus* Supernatural gifs. Read more on self-publishing after publishing by Jennifer Armentrout here.

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“Instead of sending the manuscript out to other potential markets, I waited…and waited…and waited for a response from Arabesque. I eventually got despondent and put the whole publishing idea on indefinite hold. (Pro tip: DO NOT DO THAT!)” – Liane Spicer at Novel Spaces

VIDEO

“Books have an extraordinary power to take you out of yourself and into someone else’s mindset, so that for a while at least you look at the world through different eyes.” – Ann Morgan talking about her journey Reading the World. (click on the image for the vid)Ann MorganFor For my thoughts on the book that her journey birthed, check Blogger on Books ll

POETRY

“And somewhere inside him, he wanted/ to be here for all of it: all the repeating shapes and pegs/ of that life-long game where the more things changed,/ was the more they stayed the same.” – Vladimir Lucein’s Overseer: Detention

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“It’s not your fault, no
I blame those boats
I blame the coast
Hell, I blame the tide
I blame the sea for not picking a side
I blame the slave traders and sellout chiefs alike
But it seems like you blame me
For being born in a former British colony
I sound white?
As opposed to what?
Sounding American?” – slam poet Maya Wegerif, Why You talk so White?

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This one started showing up in my social media timeline after the November 2015 Paris attacks. I decided to look it up and share it. It’s by Somali-British poet Warsan Shire:
later that night
i held an atlas in my lap
ran my fingers across the whole world
and whispered
where does it hurt?

Read all of What they did Yesterday Afternoon

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by David Crawley.jpg

by David Crawley

INTERVIEWS

w/David Baldacci:

‘A former lawyer, Baldacci still attacks his writing career as if preparing for a high-stakes defense. His typical day currently involves a few hours of work on his second Decker thriller, another few hours drafting Book 3 of Vega Jane, and another few hours on a screenplay. “During the course of the day I might work on three or four different projects, but only when I run out of gas on one do I move on to another,” Baldacci says. “I write until my tank is empty each day. I don’t count words or pages or whatever—that seems like an artificial goal for me.”’

w/Claudia Rankine:

‘“Because white men can’t/ police their imagination/ black men are dying.” What was in your mind when you wrote that line?

When white men are shooting black people, some of it is malice and some an out-of-control image of blackness in their minds. Darren Wilson told the jury that he shot Michael Brown because he looked “like a demon”. And I don’t disbelieve it. Blackness in the white imagination has nothing to do with black people.’

w/Brenda Scott Royce:

“When I struggle to think of ‘what’s next’ in a story, I draw a blank. But then I’ll be listening to NPR or shopping for groceries or having a random conversation with a stranger, and something sparks an idea. Meeting someone with an unusual occupation always makes me wonder, could one of my characters do that for a living?”

w/Marlon James:

“At some point you have to accept writing bad on the way to getting good. That you can write one hundred pages and only use twenty. I’m at the stage where that is no problem for me. I’m a very sloppy writer and I don’t rewrite, I don’t reread, until I’m done. I write everything straight to the end.”

Pamela Taivassalo Wikholm travelled from Sweden to Antigua in 2015 and interviewed a handful of local artistes – Joanne C. Hillhouse (writer), Tian Winter (singer), Mark Brown (painter); see interview links for all three below.

w/Tian Winter (Popreel TV):

“If it’s singing, just sing; someone will hear you, something will happen.”

w/Joanne C. Hillhouse (on Popreel radio):

“The writers from here that I knew and I have great respect for them were the calypso writers people like Shelly Tobitt and Marcus Christopher because when I was coming up calypso was the literature that I would hear that had some relevance to my community,, the other literature that we read was mostly from America or from Britain.”

Joanne

w/Joanne C. Hillhouse:

“The characters come to me. They don’t always reveal their stories fully, so for me writing is a journey of discovery. Like I can’t always see where it’s going but I’m kind of wandering my way through it and trying to figure out what is it all about.” – Antiguan and Barbudan writer Joanne C. Hillhouse on Sweden’s Popreel TV.

w/Tian Winter:

“If you have a dream, don’t let anybody, no one, not your mother, not your brother, no one, kill that vibe, kill that dream out of you, don’t let them out that fire.” – Antiguan and Barbudan soca artist Tian Winter on Sweden’s Popreel radio.

w/Mark Brown (on Popreel radio):

“I need to paint things that people are not saying enough, and people find hard to say, and hrd to encounter, and hard to read, and hard to speak about.”

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w/Mark Brown:

“At that time I didn’t know what it was called but I knew that I lived in a very imaginary world.” – Antiguan and Barbudan artist, Mark Brown’s interview on the Popreel TV programme on Swedish TV.

 

w/Eric Jerome Dickey :

“I walked from the undergraduate degree in Computer Systems Tech, but I carried the knowledge with me. Every class I had taken at the University of Memphis to complete those requirements; from English, to Physics, to Sociology, to Latin, to Electronics, to kicking it in karate class with Bill Wallace, it all went with me.”

w/Nalo Hopkinson:

“The Caribbean region. Writers from there are producing wonderful literature that takes language, story and form and bends them into creations you would never have believed possible.”

w/Carol Ottley-Mitchell:

“CaribbeanReads is a small publishing company dedicated to serving talented Caribbean authors. Our aim is to make publishing more accessible to potential Caribbean authors and to increase the number of high-quality books about and for the Caribbean.”

w/Ision Hutchinson, Tanya Shirley, and Christian Campbell:

“I know there are some people who are just born with exceptional talent, but for the rest of us, I recommend workshops with reputable poets, constant revision of the work, an openness to criticism and an insatiable desire to read poetry.” (Tanya Shirley in S/X Salon interview)

NON FICTION

“The self-governance of trees is mysterious and moving, though not always elegant.” – read all of Summer Edwards’ descriptive and reflective Fairmont Trees

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“When someone dies their silence becomes a sort of held note, a key on the piano pressed down for so long it becomes an ache in the ear, a new sonic register from which we start to measure our new, ruptured lives. A white noise. Maybe this is why there is so much music in dying: the funerals, the singing, the hymns, the eulogies. All those sounds crowding the air with what the dead can’t say.” – Read all of Ocean Vuong’s The Weight of Our Living: On Hope, Fire Escapes, and Visible Desperation

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“…getting a whooping from her was like getting a beating with fresh plucked feathers. I cried mostly because I didn’t want to hurt her feelings…” – Yvonne McBride, The Ballad of Broad Street

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A & B Arts Roundup

Linisa George’s Brown Girl in the Ring featured in Shakespeare in Paradise in the Bahamas. “Erin Knowles, one of the directors of Murder & Poetry, came across George’s piece as a feature in a 2014 Tongues of the Ocean issue that focused on art and literary works from Antigua and Barbuda. Knowles felt instantly connected to George’s poem and had this to say about her choice to have Brown Girl In The Ring included in her production, “The piece focuses on the element of identity and coming to terms with that which we should be proud of. I think it’s an excellent piece to be included in my production because of the language and references to the ring-play that we idolized as young children.” Brown Girl in the Ring is being performed in the round alongside other poems that align with the goal for Paradise Unmasked.” Read more.

Couple weds… “In lieu of gifts the couple requested monetary contribution in support of programs and services of the National Public Library in Antigua and Barbuda. A total of seven thousand-two hundred dollars ($7,200.00) was collected.” Read more.

Actress Francoise Bowen at Oktober Film Fest and launching acting and photography workshop. 12088521_10156134500480013_8342677097546161736_nSee her blog for details.

“I saw this as an opportunity to challenge myself.” – Antiguan and Barbudan artist Mark Brown on his participation in the “international collaborative organized by Shackles of Memory, a cultural tourism program that seeks to call attention to slave trade sites and encourage artists to create pieces for exhibition…part of TOSTEM, the French acronym for Cultural Tourism through the Footsteps of Slavery.” Read more.

“The two day workshop attracted 25 persons from the fields of design, writing, music and small businesses and covered the following areas: Overview of Crowd Funding and Social Media Marketing; Opportunities in e-Business for OECS SMEs; Crowd Funding Yesterday and Today; How to run a successful Crowd Funding campaign and the work of regional Crowd Funding platform Vision Funder based in Barbados.” Read more.

See which Antigua-based filmmaker made out at Caribbean Tales. See.

The Antigua and Barbuda Independence programme has been posted and the arts (visual, fashion, singing, music, drama, dance, pan, culinary etc.) are present-please (there’ll even be two days of car racing)…always happy to see the arts represented as they are the best representation of who we are (the arts are as necessary as air to me; yes, that’s how passionately I feel about it)… but no need to check it twice, the lit arts are in fact once again absent (the last lit art contest ended in 2011 with a stirring presentation by the then competition coordinator who recommended a way forward that seems to have fallen on deaf ears… and the Antigua and Barbuda International Literary Festival which was near the head of the pack when it started in 2006 was rumoured to be returning this year after an absence of about five (?) years but like most rumours… well…peep the schedules for yourself) …meantime we can give props to Barbuda for the inclusion of poetry at least in its programme…might be time for a visit to the sister island). But, see below, it’s not formally a part of the programme but the groups and individuals which continue to hustle outside the system aren’t sleeping on the literary arts.

Stories Handed Down

Don’t forget, one of the things I try to do on this site is alert you to Opportunities (for grants, publishing, etc.) and taking it one step further, nag you re upcoming deadlines. This one, Stories Handed Down is specific to Antigua and Barbuda. Get on that.

Sharing some thank you’s from my blog re my participation in the Brooklyn Book Festival: thanks to “the organizers of the Brooklyn Book Festival for inviting me, Musical Youth publisher CaribbeanReads for making it happen, …Beverly George and the Friends of Antigua Public Library …, my co-panelists for a wonderful shared experience, Caribbean Cultural Theatre for all they do to promote the artistes from the region, everyone who came out, family, friends etc etc …and not just thanks but big big props to talented Antiguan and Barbudan designer Miranda Askie of Miranda Askie Designs for outfitting me (in jewelry and clothing) for the event…” Haven’t read the blog or seen the pictures yet? Check it out.

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Fish Outta Water, Musical Youth, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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A & B Writings in Journals and Contests

Okay, so, this is an experimental page. I’ll see how it goes. But given the self-imposed limitations placed on the lists of Antiguan and Barbudan writing (i.e. only listing published books, book length anthologies, and CDs), I thought here would be a good place to list creative pieces by Antiguans and Barbudans accepted to established literary journals, festivals (and other notable literary platforms), and contests (not pieces posted only to personal blogs) as I discover (and in some cases, re-discover) them. Initially, this will focus on pieces accessible online because those are easiest to find; but it will not be limited to these, in time. You can recommend (in fact, I welcome your recommendations), but, as with all areas of the site, additions/subtractions are at the discretion of the admin.

AIRALL, ZAHRAThe Looking Glass – in Theorizing Homophobias in the Caribbean – Complexities of Place, Desire and Belonging – 2012

Excerpt: “They’d met at a conference in Mexico, she was from Dominica, and Laurie was instantly drawn to that thick French accent when Marie spoke.”

ARRINDELL, BARBARAA LIFE, a spirit…a name – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

ARRINDELL, BARBARA – How Snake Stories became Anansi Stories – Womanspeak: A Journal of Writing and Art by Caribbean Women, Volume 7 Womanspeak 7– 2013

ARMSTRONG, VEGALegend of the Sea Lords in Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

Excerpt: “Suddenly Freya dove under the water, the others quickly followed her. When they caught up with her they too saw the mysterious creature.”

BROWNE, BRENDA LEE – Granny Cecelia’s Travelling Handbag – Womanspeak: A Journal of Art and Writing by Caribbean Women Volume 8 Womanspeak 8– 2016

BROWNE, BRENDA LEEexcerpt from London Rocks in Moko: Caribbean Arts and Letters – 2015

Excerpt: “Dante’s mother asks if he is getting married as he smells as sweet as a bride and he had been getting ready since about 5pm – well since midday when he went to the barbers for a trim and a shape.”

BROWNE, BRENDA LEEFor my Father & Untitled – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

BROWNE, BRENDA LEE – Betty Sope – Womanspeak: A Journal of Writing and Art by Caribbean Women, Volume 7 – 2013

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – Wee Willie Winkie – The Caribbean Writer Volume 29Caribbean Writer 29 – 2015

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – Stabs in the Dark – Akashic’s Mondays are Murder series – 2014

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – Strange Fruit – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – No Frills, No Lace in Poui: Cave Hill Journal of Creative Writing – 2014

Excerpt: “The director’s walk was ceremonious not in haste, perhaps from years of practice. He carried one hand lying in the other at the back of his buttocks and he went along with his head bowed.”

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – Coo Yah – in Moko: Caribbean Arts and Letters (online Virgin Islands journal)- 2014

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMICocks, Hens, Dogs and Swine – in St. Somewhere (online literary journal) – 2013

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMIThe Bird who saved his Food – in Anansesem (online Caribbean Children’s Literary Journal) – 2013

Excerpt: “Once upon a time an albatross got caught in a fisherman’s net that was spread out at sea.”

BROWNE-BANNISTER, TAMMI – Mango Belly and Mango Belly Part 2 – in Anansesem (online Caribbean Children’s Literary Journal) – 2011

Excerpt: “He ate each and every kidney, tantalizing his classmates with every suck, pick, slurp and lick. Their mouths watered and their eyes followed the golden juices that gushed down his hands.”

BUTLER, LORINDA T.Antigua Me Come From – in The Caribbean Writer, Volume 8 – 1994.

D’ORNELLAS, ANNALISA -Toes in the Sand – national contest selection (no word of announced publication) – 2009

Excerpt: “I was once a girl
that played on these shores.
I gathered the shells
in  bundles and scores.
I wore them on my neck
and strung some as bangles
I  noticed their twinkling
and delightful angles.”

EDWARDS, GEORGE W. (AS TOLD TO JOHN H. JOHNSON) – Folklore from Antigua, British West Indies – Journal of American Folklore Vol. 34 No. 131 pp. 40-88 – Jan – March, 1921

Excerpt (from Johnson’s introduction): “The stories, riddles, and proverbs given in this collection were recited by George W. Edwards, a native of Greenbay, Antigua, British West Indies…George Edwards is a man fifty years old. In giving the bulk of this material, he exhibited unusual memory-power. Aside from prompting, suggestions, and riddles Nos. 34, 39, 42, 45, and 47, he alone is responsible for the entire collection. He has lived in New York for the past ten years. His greatest aid in recalling the stories has been his wife, who is about thirty years of age and also a native of Greenbay, Antigua. She is the informant of the five riddles mentioned above.”

EDWARDS, GEORGE W. (AS TOLD TO JOHN H. JOHNSON)The Chosen Suitor from Folklore from Antigua, British West Indies, Journal of American Folklore Vol. 34 No. 131 as reproduced in Bluebeard (ed. D. L. Ashliman) – 1999 -2014

Excerpt: “Dere’s a woman had one daughter an one son. Dis boy coco-bay, boy, an’ he was an’ ol’ witch too.”

EDWARDS, SHAKEEMADiaspora & That Laugh – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

EVANSON, TANYA – Apocalypsiata – Womanspeak: A Journal of Art and Writing by Caribbean Women, Volume 7 – 2013

Excerpt: “Soon there’ll be nothing left to burn/books, beds, bodies on the Barbie”

EVANSON, TANYA – reading/performing at Calgary Spoken Word Festival – 2013.

EVANSON, TANYADervish Weaponry from the CD Memorists on Badilisha Poetry.

EVANSON, TANYA – reading/performing about “An-teee-ga”,  The Travels of No Travels and other pieces at the Calgary Spoken Word Festival.

Excerpt: “Let me tell you bout that place/in Caribbean/clear blue water/sand sat between your toes/in hot sun/and the people/my people/and not my people/Antigua”

GEORGE, LINISA – In the Closet – BBC Poetry Postcards series – 2014.

GEORGE, LINISA – Brown Girl in the Ring – performed during the CARA Festival, Antigua, 2009. Later published in the World Record (a publication of global artistes invited to perform at the 2012 Poetry Parnassus staged to coincide with the 2012 Olympics). Published (2014) in Tongues of the Ocean. Also featured, the Charlotte Caribbean Festival, and, 2015, in the Shakespeare festival in the Bahamas.

GONSALVES, GAYLEMiss Ellie – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

Excerpt: ‘Ellie points to England, a land that is far from the Caribbean Sea, and smiles at her daughter, “This is where it all started.”’

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.*Little Prissy Palmer – The Machinery – 2017

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.The Other Daughter – Adda – 2017

Excerpt: “The day we went uphill, my corn-rowed head level with Mom’s melon-sized chest, my inquiries about where we were going were met with silence and a determined tug on my arm as I dragged my feet.”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – The Bamboo Raft, Election Season, and Zombie Island – Interviewing the Caribbean – 2017

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – Game Changer – Moko: Caribbean Arts and Letters, Vol. 9 – 2016

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.Children Melee in Moko: Caribbean Arts and Letters – 2014

Excerpt: “Peanuts roasting
 Music pumping
 Obsti prancing about in pigtails”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – To Market, Snapshot in Susumba’s Book Bag

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.Summer 1 – The Missing Slate – 2013 & Something Wicked – The Missing Slate – 2014

Excerpt: “Essie is flamboyant as ever; her full and curvy frame hugged up by a red bustier straight out of a burlesque show, black leather pants, and dangerously (sexy, she would say) red heels that still only bring her up to Claudette’s chin. Claudette is also in black, tall and svelte in a black strappy ankle-length maxi dress, black combat boots and a black beaded cloche hat someone like Louise Brooks might have worn during the jazz era; her red-red lip stick and the red beading in the fitted cap, the only pop of colour. Essie had given the whole get-up an eye roll when she’d picked her up. Claudette had done her own mental eye roll at the way her friend, enviably comfortable in her own skin, still doesn’t get the concept of size-appropriate clothing.”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.The Cat has Claws in Akashic’s Monday’s are Murder online noir series – 2013.

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. Differences – published in Theorizing Homophobias in the Caribbean – Complexities of Place, Desire and Belonging – 2012

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.Teacher May – published in Poui: Cave Hill Journal of Creative Writing – 2011

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – Ghosts Lament – published at the SX Literary Salon – 2011.

Excerpt: “…as someone beats a pan; a skanking Marley jam…”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. At Sea – published in Munyori – 2011.

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – She Works – – national contest selection 2009 (published 2012 in Womanspeak: A Journal of Art and Literature by Caribbean Women Volume 6)

Excerpt:”The dog growls
The fowl scratches at the ground”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C.Friday Night Fish Fry – published in Sea Breeze – 2008.

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. The Arrival – published in Calabash – 2008.

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – Da’s Calypso – published in Calabash – 2008.

Excerpt: “He na min school pon
Shakespeare,
but he understan’ well
de ingenuity o’
wan pun,
weave imagery o’
everyday life
inna song –”

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. Cold Paradise – published in Women Writers’ special voodoo issue – 2008.

HILLHOUSE, JOANNE C. – reading excerpts from unpublished manuscript Closed for Repairs and poems Second Middle Passage and Apocalyptic Dance while a participant in the Caribbean Fiction Writers Summer Institute at the University of Miami – 1995.

Excerpt: “A sister pimping her soul
A baby with a gun in his hand
Love gone cold”

*Clearly, I’ll know all of my credits but I don’t want this page to be the Joanne show, so this is just a sample. Follow the links to read other published fiction and poetry by me. Some of it is also available in Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings.

ISAAC-GELLIZEAU, DOTSIE – Home – national contest selection (no word of announced publication) – 2009.

Excerpt:”Her soul and heart rejoiced
Upright and locked position”

JARVIS-GEORGE, TAMEKA Woman to Woman – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

JARVIS-GEORGE, TAMEKA – Poem Ugly featured in film of the same name.

JARVIS-GEORGE, TAMEKA – Poem Dinner featured in film of the same name.

JOSEPH, CLIFTON – That Night in Tunisia  – performed in the documentary Dark Arts in the Plastic Hallway – 2009.

JOSEPH, CLIFTONI Remember Back Home & Slo Mo – performed at the Words Aloud 4 Spoken Word Festival in Canada – 2007.

Excerpt:
“It wasn’t all bright smiles, sea sand, sun and
fun

Back home had its share of oppression in the sun

Back home had its share of dreams burnt in the
sun”

LAKE, EDGAR O. – Little Richard’s Second Coming in Calabash – 2007.

Excerpt: ‘But, the Faithful wait for the King of Pommade, Tuti
The Monarch of Mascara, pre-Pink Floyd, Tuti-Fruti
He’s turned his back on Hollywood – protesting!
He’s the King of Rock-and-Roll – will take it back –
“This Little Light of Mine – Say What?”
The tired Daughters of the Carolinas toss their curls
Little Richard’s seen the fork in the road – and took it

Praise his name!’

LAKE, EDGAR O.Walcott Reads to Brodsky’s Godmother in Calabash – 2007.

LANGLEY, CHARLESBlack Woman Cry – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014.

MCDONALD, HILDA – Dawn and Evensong – KYK-OVER-AL No. 22: Anthology of West Indian Poetry, edited by A. J. Seymour (p. 47) – 1957.

MEDICA, HAZRA – The Greeting in Poui: Cave Hill Journal of Creative Writing – 2012.

MEDICA, HAZRA Ode to a Night in Ale – finalist in the Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest – 2010.

MEDICA, HAZRAThe Banana Stains – Highly Recommended in the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association Short Story Contest – 2008/9.

Excerpt: “I see my father motioning for me to come to him. His face is grim- the inspector had not been kind to him. On the drive home I think of Mr. Massiah and his stained clothing. Mr. Massiah has calloused hands. His hands make me think of the banana trunk in my dream.”

MINGS, KIMOLISALittle Red Hoodie – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014.

PHILLIPS, ROWAN RICARDO – reading at Poets Out Loud – 2011

PHILLIPS, ROWAN RICARDO – Two Poems – Granta – 2010.

RICHARDS, ROSALIESmitten – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEA – Runners in the Marathon of Time – Womanspeak: A Journal of Art and Writing by Caribbean Women Volume 8 – 2016

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEA – Camp – Moko: Caribbean Arts & Letters – 2016

Excerpt: “We read menacing messages in the scowls
 of passers-by. Some circle around,
 mark the territory with treads of footprints,
 count down days to our departure.”

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEASmall Island Deprivations Unwanted Visitors –Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEA – Neighbour’s in the Wood Shack, Desiree’s Revenge, Flawless, Play-Mamas, and A Kind of Refuge/Living in Limbo – Womanspeak: A Journal of Writing and Art by Caribbean Women, Volume 7 – 2013

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEAThe Haunt of Alma Negron in St. Somewhere – 2013

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEA – Burdened (which is quoted below along with six others) – Published in KRITYA Poetry Journal, Fall 2012 (www.kritya.in).

Excerpt: “Everything is on her head.

She trudges forward.

A straw mat tops the aluminum basin

filled with rescued essentials.

Her face, veiled in dust,

masks the fear beating her breast.

Her feet, swollen from endless trooping,

take her where others go.

Carrying memories of death,

she follows a long trek to nowhere,

and pauses only to suckle the child

strapped to her back.”

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEA – Love at first Sound – Published in Off the Coast, Maine’s International Literary Journal, Winter (http://www.off-the-coast.com) – 2011.

Excerpt: “She loved the rhythm
of their singing
and the music of letters
spun off tongues,
that whirled in her ears.”

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEALiberian Curfew at Tongues of the Ocean – 2010.

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEAThe Nation Builders – at Medellin Poetry Festival – 2010.

Excerpt:

“…condemned as job snatchers

Pounced on by immigration

They are herded into vans

Shackled like cattle…”

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEAWaking the Obeah Within Us  a series including the poems Jumbi Eyes, Clippings, Turn the Broomstick Up, FRAID, Web Weaving at Women Writers- 2008

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEARevolution and Reggae published in Calabash – 2007.

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEAEaster Sunday – published in The Caribbean Writer – Volume 10 1996

Excerpt: “They say if you come back they goin’ block the entrance to the church.”

“For what? What I do to them?”

“They say you make the man leave his wife of twenty years to marry you.”

“But, that’s their business?”

“They don’t see how Joseph could leave his wife to marry you. You know what they call you?”

“What?”

“Black, ugly, long mouth. . .”

ROMEO-MARK, ALTHEANager Man, Poverty, No Teeth Nana, Cha-Cha Town’s Blackbird – published in Palaver – Downtown Poet’s Co-op, New York, 1978.

Excerpt:

“Bokrah man
lashing whip ‘pon back.
Nager man
lashing whip ‘pon back
when slavery

done gone long time.”

SIMON, MONIQUE S. Color of Love – published in Calabash Volume 3 Number 2 Fall/Winter 2005

SIMON, MONIQUE S.NIGHT LIGHT (Ode to Bolans Village, Antigua –‘Home’) – published in Calabash Volume 3 Number 2 Fall/Winter 2005

Excerpt: “It was night, so it was light
Island light
Home for the night light
Man whispering to woman light
Child teasing child ‘bout daytime, schoolyard game light
Extension chord attached to hanging bulb over old wood tables with dominoes, cards,
and checkerboards light
Bob Marley, Short Shirt, King Obstinate, Charlie Pride, old-time calypso light
Home from ‘de week doing live-in maid job light

It was night, so it was light carried like electric current throughout the night in the small
village…

Tonight, Saturday night
Bolans was dark but it was light, real light”

SIMON, MONIQUE S. – Raven in my Arms – published in Calabash Volume 3 Number 2 Fall/Winter 2005

SPENCER, CHARLENE – Stranger – published (p. 31) in The Caribbean Writer Volume 28 Volume_28__2014__5433ea290b7cf_150x225–  2014

THOMAS, DEVRAHer Missing Fingers – Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

 WILLIAMS (NOW WHYTE), FLOREEYohan! – published in Anansesem

WILLIAMS, ZION EBONYThe Night I went to Cricket – in Tongues of the Ocean – 2014

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, Fish Outta Water, Oh Gad!, and With Grace). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen, my books, and my freelance writing-editing-coaching-workshop services. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, A & B WRITINGS, Caribbean Plus Lit News, Links We Love, Literary Gallery

READING ROOM VII

Like the title says, this is the seventh reading room. Use the search feature to your right and the term ‘reading room’ to find the others. Six came before, pack-full-0 good reading: poetry, fiction, non fiction, and some visuals too. Good reading makes for good writing. So use the reading rooms like your personal library and enjoy. And remember, keep coming back; they’re never finished. As I discover things, things get added. And don’t be shy about sharing your thoughts re not only what you read here but also possible additions to the reading room.

BLOG

Monique Roffey (Trinidad and Tobago), author of The White Woman on the Green Bicycle -a book I recommended in my Blogger on Books a while back – shares writing advice and recommended reads in this post. I also want to mention that another Roffey post sparked a most interesting discussion re Caribbean literature – check out this post (also this) and this one from Vladimir Lucien (St. Lucia) for more on that.

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Have you read any of these Caribbean women writers?

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Love everything about this post and Shakirah Bourne’s gushing nervousness and excitement over meeting her literary hero. READ MORE.

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“Make no apology for your language, and nobody will expect one.” Bajan Shakirah Bourne speaks about the write to use our natural, our mother, our heart language in life and on the page. Sidebar: that bit about Dickens struck me about him training his ear and his hand to write what people said, and how they said it; as a reporter, who writes what some people think is short hand but is actually Joanne-warp-speed-hand, I’m beginning to see how my life tracking down stories and interviewing people shaped and shapes the stories I tell and how I tell them. Still figuring it out, but yeah, that resonated with me. Plus I love Dickens. Sidebar over. Substantively, Bourne writes about Scottish author Irvine Welsh and what we can learn about how he uses dialect, unapologetically. Read the full here.

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I was tempted to put this art-heavy Althea Romeo Mark post in the visual category but it’s an art blog,  in which she reminds us that “art is part of our everyday life” and shows us too. Read and see here.

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Food for thought: 5 Reasons to Wait and Slow Down when it comes to Publishing your Book.

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In this post, Jamaican writer Diane Browne wonders, what is it about Calabash, the literary festival that leaves us all a little bit drunk on words. Dr. Carolyn Cooper also had some musings about the magical festival.

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What Makes a Writer ‘Caribbean’? asks Lisa Allen-Agostini

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Creative people can be oddities…but that’s a good thing…really…and daring to be a little odd can be good for anyone. Embarrass Yourself. It’s Good for the Heart by Elaine Orr.

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“I think you have to work hard, and you have to place yourself in the light somehow – whether it is at readings, by writing online, by submissions, by reaching out to people as you have just done – and if you stand there long enough and nicely enough (i.e. as part of a bigger picture, not as the star of your own show!), then good things do happen.” – RU FREEMAN RESPONDS TO A ASPIRING WRITER

FICTION

I’ll confess I haven’t fully read Gateway – a Caribbean Sampler in the Missing Slate as yet but somehow I have no qualms about recommending it. When you’re done, check out the first issue of Susumba’s Book Bag.

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“You wake to see the sunrise exactly once a year. The cock’s crow which normally signals the start of the day alerts you that you are late.

Kadooment Day is here.” READ MORE OF THIS BARBADOS FESTIVAL FROM THE UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE OF SHAKIRAH BOURNE’S PEN IN ‘THE FOOT IS MINE’

INTERVIEWS

Elizabeth Nunez being interviewed on NPR about my book Oh Gad!

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Kei Miller interview.

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John Robert Lee’s interview with the ARC has some interesting insights about the arts scene in St. Lucia which some may find also mirrors the scene in their territory. Read the full here.

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Audio interview – my girl, Belizean writer Ivory Kelly on the BBC.

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“The IDEA is key. Get your IDEA straight and you can execute it in a thousand ways. But the IDEA must always be singular and original.” – Read more of Jamaican Roland Watson-Grant’s interview with Annie Paul.

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“There’s been a kind of amnesia,” he says, “or not wanting to focus on this, because of it being so painful. It’s kind of crazy. We can deal with the second world war and the Holocaust and so forth and what not, but this side of history, maybe because it was so hideous, people just do not want to see. People do not want to engage.” More from the director of 12 Years a Slave here.

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“My father recited poetry all the time, spasmodically and loudly in the house. But there was a method to his madness. He read with a compelling rotundity: Neruda’s ‘United Fruit Company’, Wilfred Owen’s ‘Exposure’, Martin Carter’s ‘This is the Dark Time My Love’, Derek Walcott’s ‘As John to Patmos’, Dylan Thomas’ ‘Do Not Go Gently Into that Good Night’. He also wrote and was very modest about doing so.” – Read more of the Arc’s interview with St. Lucian poet Vladimir Lucien.

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“In a way Island Princess in Brooklyn celebrates my father’s family and their journey. Interestingly enough, Cordelia Finds Fame and Fortune celebrated the fact that fame and fortune can be found here at home (no need to migrate). However, Princess is forced to migrate and forced to make a new life or return home. Is this back story then part of the journey, a journey in which I am now able to look outwards from our island to our people overseas? This circle of family, of story, fills me with wonder.” – Diane Browne, Read the full interview at the Brown Bookshelf.

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“My greatest fortune has come from the people who believed in me who have allowed my writing to flourish, and from the many individuals who I’ve come into contact with during the creative process of writing. However I have yet to walk into a bookstore and see my books there, that remains a dream!  So – a mixed life, and at the age of 60 I know I have much to be thankful for and hope when and if my writing is read, that it will bring inspiration to others.” – Read more o Arc magazine’s interview with Commonwealth short story prize winner for the Caribbean region.

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Carib Lit interviews Ezekiel Alan, a self published Jamaican novelist who claimed the Commonwealth book prize. Now that’s inspiring. How’d he do it?

“Get honest feedback, from people not too close to you. Do as professional a job as possible — get your book properly edited and proofread.”  Alan also encourages writers to develop and stick with a writing routine and to think outside the box in selecting story ideas. “It is tougher to compete by producing what everyone else is producing.”

Read more.

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Writer-colleague and Burt Award Winner A-dZiko Gegele told me on facebook “Your ‘Island SisStar’, Jamaica Kincaid was at Calabash Jamaica this year – what a fabulous soul – she was witty, and full of humility and grace – highly rated by the audience.” Here’s Susumba’s coverage of that interview.

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So much inspiration to pull from in this interview, it was hard to excerpt just one but in the end I went this: “Whatever work we do, we must work from the heart.” Dena Simmons is an American educator and activist with Antiguan and Barbudan roots. I know because I was at a literary conference in the USA where among the very few black people there, there was one other Antiguan or so she introduced herself to me and I’m happy to have made the connection. Read up.

NON FICTION

Zadie Smith’s 10 rules for writing.

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“I write because the island I live in is small, and I feel a sting each time the people who ask where I am from, then cut short their attention when they realize just how small it is, cut short their attention because the island is not on the radar of much-of-the-world, unless one sharpens the gaze.” – Jonathan Bellot. Read more.

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I hardly know where to excerpt, there’s so much wisdom here but…how about this:

“If you like fantasy and you want to be the next Tolkien, don’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies — Tolkien didn’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies, he read books on Finnish philology. Go and read outside of your comfort zone, go and learn stuff.”

Incidentally, I remember a professor making a similar point about being a journalist, he suggested that we needed to spend less time in the bubble of learning about media and communications and more time just learning about…well, everything.

Read more from Neil Gaiman here.

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“As a child being educated in Guyana, English Literature was an invitation to other worlds, an invitation which has never lost its appeal…” read more of Maggie Harris reflecting on a literary journey which most recently spiked with her 2014 win of the Commonwealth Short Story prize for the Caribbean region.

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If you’re thinking of publishing especially in the children’s market and you live in the Caribbean, you should read this article by Kellie Magnus.

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“In the first draft I sometimes found my characters being mouthpieces for me and my good intentions, and that made the writing weak and bland. In the second draft, I shut up and let the characters do their own talking, and the story improved considerably. The struggle of the protagonist to come to an understanding of herself beyond victimhood was also much clearer when I didn’t try to impose a social justice agenda on her. She became not merely a representative of all children and adults who have survived child sexual abuse, but a real character, with hopes and fears and wants and needs she tries to meet in the way she knows how to, and I had to let her speak for herself in order to give her the agency her history had denied her.” – READ MORE OF LISA ALLEN-AGOSTINI’S ATTEMPTS  TO NAVIGATE THE TERRAIN BETWEEN NON FICTION HORROR AND FICTION WITH BOTH A SOCIAL CONSCIENCE AND A REAL HEART BEAT.

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“I want to write poetry that is alive, fresh, vibrant, contemporary in feeling, readable, thought-provoking, playfully subversive, powerful, and yet still tender. I want it to be full of the energy, culture, history, music, natural beauty, spirituality, and social struggles of Puerto Rico, and other islands of the Caribbean where I have visited or lived… I don’t write love poetry, and I don’t rhyme. I write because I want to communicate with readers in a way that matters, makes an impact, or makes some kind of beneficial difference in the reader’s thoughts and in the society. Can poetry do that? I still believe in the power of the word…If there is any “must” for a poet, from my perspective, it is to widely read other poets and thus develop the ability to sort out your own place as both an innovator and a member of an ongoing literary community and tradition that you will nourish and be nourished by.” READ MORE INSIGHTS FROM PUERTO RICAN POET LORETTA COLLINS KOBLAH

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Plagiarists, Muses and ‘Stalk-home’ Syndrome by Farzana Versey.

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Never give up…plus, yay, supernatural gifs: Jennifer L. Armentrout on Why I’m not the Person to ask about self-publishing.

POETRY

Antiguan and Barbudan Linisa George’s Poetry Postcard on the BBC, In the Closet.

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St. Lucian Vladimir Lucien’s Poetry Post Card on the BBC, Ebb 1.

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“In Carnival season, he is Lord and often Monarch, but at his day job, he is a squire at White Knight Laundry, where hotels and restaurants hire linens for special occasions, and employees wash, iron, mend, pick-up, and drop off.” This line captured for me that split between real life and the larger than life calypso persona of the Carnival season. Read the full poem – What He Brought For Me by Loretta Collins Koblah – in the July 2014 edition of Caribbean Beat.

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“Tonight I want to offer you
this moonlight cupped in a purple
flower …” sigh, right? Swoon to the rest of this Esther Phillips poem, And Yet Again, here.

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Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep by Elizabeth Frye

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Poetry Parnassus – “verse from each Olympic nation

VISUAL

Calypso is storytelling… check out this Sparrow classic for a brief lesson. Don’t forget to dance.

Other calypso video posts on this site include: the Latumba post, the King Obtinate post, and the Short Shirt post.

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Something I’ve long wanted to do with the Wadadli Pen stories.

As with all content (words, images, other) on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight,  Fish Outta Water, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about WadadliPen and my books. You can also subscribe to and/or follow the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks. And remember while linking and sharing the links, referencing and excerpting, with credit, are okay, lifting whole content (articles,  images, other) from the site without asking is not cool. Respect copyright.

 

 

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Dis ‘n Dat

***DISCLAIMER: By definition, you’ll be linking to third party sites from these Links-We-Love pages. Linked sites are not, however, reviewed or controlled by Wadadli Pen (the blog, the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize nor coordinator/blogger Joanne C. Hillhouse); and Wadadli Pen (the blog, the Wadadli Youth Pen Prize and coordinator/blogger Joanne C. Hillhouse) disclaims any responsibility or liability relating to any linked sites and does not assume any responsibility for their contents. In other words, enter at your own risk.

ABS TV – LIVE STREAMING

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Antigua – history in pictures (archival photos)

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Antiguan, Nadine has two interesting, I would say lifestyle blogs. One, Local Flavours Added, can be found here and the other, Antigua A La Carte, can be found here.

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Think of it as a Trini Amazon with an artistic bent; it’s Ah Piece! – a place where you can source the creations of Trinidad and Tobago artisans, online. Now isn’t that a novel idea more Caribbean art communities should embrace?

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Antigua Views seems to be a pov somewhere between tourist and new arrival of cultural and artistic observations ranging from a first Children’s Carnival to artist interviews centred in the ex-pat community, to posts on craft and dining with an island flavor.

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http://www.antiguanice.com – Before Wadadli Pen ever had its own site, it had a page on Antigua Nice, the country’s local online hub, thanks to the generousity of Colin and Alison Sly-Adams.

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http://antiguamusic.com – Antiguan and Barbudan music.

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http://antiguastories.wordpress.com/about/ – The Friends of Antigua Public Library is interested in collecting oral histories; some of them are posted here. Do you have a story to share? I’m sure they’d like to hear it.

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The Antiguanization Project – here’s their facebook and their website.

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Antigua and Barbuda Coalition of Service Industries

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Virtual home of the Antigua and Barbuda Progressive Society based in New York.

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http://www.antiguapublib.org – This is the homepage for the national library of Antigua and Barbuda. The book listings seem incomplete and the site in general doesn’t seem to have been updated in a while, but it seems to be a good portal to research resources, teaching aids and such.

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Antiguan Writer – this is my current you tube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/AntiguanWriter

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Art.Culture.Antigua – Linisa George stays innovating with her latest web platform, this one a celebration of all things artistic.

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Archeology Antigua with Dr. Reginald Murphy, director of Heritage Resources for the National Parks Antigua, president of the International Association for Caribbean Archaeology, affiliated Professor of the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center, co-director on the Human Eco-dynamics Research Group CUNY Graduate Center, co-founder and President of the Museum of Antigua, and the Secretary General for the National Commission UNESCO Antigua and Barbuda. Dr. Murphy is, also, a “Restoration Ambassador to the St. John’s Cathedral, a trustee of the Clarence House Restoration Trust in the U.K., Chairman of the Betty’s Hope Estate Project, and a director of the Barbuda Research and Archaeological Center.

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Best of Books Antigua on facebook.

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Black Public Media.

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Need to get around by bus in Antigua but don’t know the routes? You’ll want to check out Bus Stop Antigua.

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A charity to aid Caribbean Children.

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The Caribbean Commons which primarily announces Caribbean Studies events and publications of interest.

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Caribbean Painters

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Into philosophy? This might interest you: it’s the link to the Caribbean Philosophical Association.

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Got some fresh news from Chosen Sounds in the email today. I’m going to share their links here not just because owner Omari Harrigan was very generous with his support of the launch of my book Oh Gad! in 2012 but because they are all-in on the support of the musical arts in Antigua and Barbuda. Find them at www.chosensounds.net and www.theyard268.com

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http://www.creativecaribbeannetwork.com – Like the name says this is  network of creative people.

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Honestly don’t know a lot about this but it seems like something I need to get to know more about: the Creative Industries Exchange.

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http://danielleboodoofortune.blogspot.com – I’ve been a fan of Trini Danielle Boodoo Fortune’s poetry since I met and shared a panel with her in Barbados in 2008. Who knew she was such a delightful artist as well?

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Danish West Indies – online searchable historical records.

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http://www.darienbookaid.org – In existence since 1949, Darien Book Aid is a non-profit, all volunteer organization that builds a foundation of peace, understanding, and friendship through the free distribution of books. Book Aid sends books in response to specific requests from Peace Corps volunteers,  libraries and schools all over the world   Books are also donated to libraries, prisons, hospitals, and Native American and Appalachian groups in the United States. Among the groups, Dariend Book Aid has donated to is the Cushion Club right here in Antigua.

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http://www.darkwaves.com/sfch/writing/ckilian/ – I thought this link might be useful to others trying to jump start their writing (and specifically novel writing). Ok, at this posting, I’ve only read the section on ‘Reading a Contract’ but having been through a few book contracts myself, I thought the information would be useful to other writers trying to make sense of it all. This is another link of writing prompts.

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http://freshmilkbarbados.com/ – Fresh Milk is a Caribbean non-profit, artist-led, inter-disciplinary organization that supports creatives and promotes wise social, economic, and environmental stewardship through creative engagement with society and by cultivating excellence in the arts.

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Antigua-based artist Gilly Gobinet (whose books you would have seen mentioned in the Antiguan and Barbudan Writings and Antiguan and Barbudan Non Fiction Writings lists) has a website where she blogs on active projects; interesting for those interested in process.

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Just discovered this History of Antigua and Barbuda in Writings, Photographs, and Stories by Dr. Susan Lowes; worth checking out. And related to that, the Arawwwak project, a Columbia University project directed by Dr. Lowes.

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The History Makers

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http://islandstyle.typepad.com – Okay, so this site isn’t strictly literary but the blogger (an Antiguan) does have an engaging style and occasionally posts excerpts of fictions. But mostly it’s about fashion…and what’s wrong with that?

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http://www.karibbeanexpressions.com/  – This site promotes Caribbean talent. ‘Nuff said.

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http://www.markbrownart.com/ – Mark Brown is the extremely talented Antiguan artist and art teacher who has generously donated his time to coordinate the judging of the visual arts portion of Wadadli Pen, added in 2010.  Check out his Angel in Crisis series of images.

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http://merrick.library.miami.edu/digitalInitiatives/cwsi/date.html – The Caribbean Fiction Writers Summer Institute ran from 1991 to 1996 at the University of Miami. I (JCH) had the opportunity to participate in this programme in 1995 as a participant in the fiction  workshop led by Olive Senior. It was during this summer that I started work on the Boy from Willow Bend. It was a life changing experience learning from, sharing with, experiencing literary brothers and sisters from the Caribbean; rare and delightful company indeed. This link will take you to audio recordings of writers who participated in this programme including over the years Mervyn Morris, Geoffery Philp, Zee Edgell, Earl Lovelace, Lorna Goodison and so many others. My reading can be found at Programme 13, 1995. Take your time, browse the archives and enjoy.

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Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology – I kind of wish Arts was in there but …

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The Museum of Antigua and Barbuda – Opened in 1985 and housed in one of the oldest and best preserved buildings on the island, this is, of course, one of the best spots for exploring Antigua and Barbuda’s history. See the old Museum site.

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Museum of Photography and Fine Arts – Photo museum showcasing the history of Antigua & Barbuda – a project of photographer and publisher Timothy Payne – located in the upstairs gallery at the Multipurpose Centre Perry Bay – the subject matter is mostly historical

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Nugents of Antigua – bumped across this bit of local history, thought I’d share it.

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Other Artists – a gallery page that includes bios of several Antiguan and Barbudan artists.

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http://www.searchantigua.com/ – Ken Shipley was a God send with the first Wadadli Pen website.Here’s his site chock full of all things Antiguan and Barbudan. Including this listing of Antiguan and Barbudan writers.

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http://sheroxlox.tumblr.com – I heart this blog by feminist activist Amina Doherty. Here’s her tumblr.

Amina photo part of the She Rox Lox series byZIA Photography.

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Permit me to mention this other artist, Barbadian artist Sheena Rose, whom I had the opportunity to profile for my former Zing column Creative Space – http://sroseart.tumblr.com/

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I edited a book for this blogger, a delicious culinary book. It’s not in wide release yet; meantime, check out her blog: Sitting in a Mango Tree.

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It’s a little known secret that while I don’t cook (well), I do watch cooking shows and troll cooking sites like this one: Tastes Like Home.

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You’ve heard of the TED Talks and likely seen ones (like this one by Sir Ken Robinson on how schools as currently constructed kill creativity, Tracey Chevalier’s wonderful presentation on finding the story inside the painting, and Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie’s powerful presentation the Danger of a Single Story) well this is the TEDx – TED affiliated local events – this one in Barbados.

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Travelling Light – this site is on a mission to collect an object – physical or virtual – from every country in the world. And, yes, I sent them something from Antigua and Barbuda.

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As a space for theatrical presentations in Antigua, in fact the focal point of theatre in Antigua in the 1970s to the 1980s and also the first place where earlier in the double zeros I saw a Walcott play live for the first time, the University Centre (now the University of the West Indies Open Campus – Antigua and Barbuda) is not totally out of place on this site.

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I like the beauty of Van Gogh’s art and find his life so fascinating…fascinating like I’d like to see it on screen someday, with maybe Michael Fassbender in the title role…yeah, I’d go see that…in the meantime, check out the man and his work – Van Gogh, not Fassbender – here at the Van Gogh Gallery.

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Wadadli West USA – US based group connected to the Villa/Point community in Antigua.

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http://www.youtube.com/user/WayneBowen – Stilll  on You Tube, I have to mention Jamaican Wayne Bowen’s vid uploads. I actually had the opportunity to collaborate with other writers from the region (including Bowen, who is also the director of the vids) on creating these for the Caribbean Family Planning Affiliation.

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White Creole Conversations –  a new dialogue privileging open and honest communication. Rather than asking ‘who am I?’ the question posed might be ‘who are you?’ The focus of the conversations pivot on issues to do with race and class in this small post-colonial island space and take place between the artist and the participant.

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http://womenspeak.tumblr.com/ – This is a space for women to share their stories, embrace their power, and celebrate their womanhood. It’s also a space of vulnerability and pain where the struggles and sacrifices are spotlighted. It’s an inclusive space, constantly updated with information and prompts designed to engage the reader in the process. Also, it’s 100 percent Caribbean. Check it out.

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WiWords – a user driven online dictionary of Caribbean terms.

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Hard to get printed historical material seems to be available through this site.

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Want a better world for girls? Say domething, here.

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Met Annie Paul at the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars conference in 2012. This is where she blogs on the literary arts and other things. Also had the opportunity to reconnect with well known author, literary scholar and former professor Carolyn Cooper and like Paul she is another thought provoking blogger out of Jamaica. Here’s where she stirs it up.

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As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, and Oh Gad!). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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