Tag Archives: Prize

Wadadli Pen 2021 – The Short List

I (Joanne C. Hillhouse, author and Wadadli Pen founder and coordinator), zoomed today with my fellow judges, author, publisher, and veteran Wadadli Pen judge Floree Williams Whyte and past winner and first time judge Devra Thomas. After separately creating our own list of ranked entries (entries, not writers whom the judges didn’t know as they read) from among 72 entries, and an average ranking from that list, guided solely by numerical ranking, leading to the posting of a long list, we discussed the long list, revisited the entries, lobbied and debated, and ranked, and we have a short list. Congrats to everyone who entered for trying (that’s important in #TheWritingLife) and to those who made the short list. How that short list breaks down will be revealed at our Awards ceremony (which is our next project activity – details to come). But in the meantime, join us in congratulating writers short listed for the Wadadli Pen 2021 Challenge Prize.

The plaque bearing the main prize winners’ name, which hangs in the Best of Books bookstore, got an upgrade in 2016 and is now known as the Alstyne Allen Memorial Plaque.

Eunike Caesar – The Blackboard (fiction)
Jason Gilead – The Great Old Woodslave (fiction)
Gazelle Zauditu Menen Goodwin – Beautiful Disaster (poetry)
Sheniqua Maria Greaves – The Juxtaposed Reprieve (fiction)
Ashley-Whitney Joshua – Hiraeth (fiction)
Aunjelique Liddie – The Beach (poetry)
Kevin Liddie – Mildred, You No Easy (fiction)
Razonique Looby – Vixen (fiction)
Andre Warner – The Brave One (fiction)

Congrats as well to the writers who made the long list. Since we mentioned only the titles and not the names before, they were (in addition to the short listed writers above) – Noleen Azille (Mission: Covered, fiction); Annachiara Bazzoni (Maybe, poetry); Aria-Rose Browne (Spirit of the Flame, fiction); Rosemund Dinard-Gordon (Emerging, poetry); Naeem Desouza (The Goat in the Rainforest of Puerto Rico, fiction); Jai Francis (The Legend of the Snowy Egret, poetry); Anastatia K. Mayers (Home, poetry); Linita Simon (The Breeze, fiction); Kadisha Valerie (The Silence was So Loud, fiction); and Latisha Walker Jacobs (Nothing Like Me, poetry).

All long listed writers will have the opportunity to participate in a workshop facilitated by me post-season (thanks to sponsorship from one of our patrons) – other prizes will be announced at the awards ceremony. 

The winning school, i. e. the school with the most submissions, is St. Anthony’s Secondary School. Congrats to them and to teachers at all schools who had to rise to meet the challenges of a most extraordinary year.

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Wadadli Pen 2020 – What Popped, What Flopped

Season’s Greetings.

Just doing my annual check-in to see what people responded (and didn’t respond) to on the blog this year. It’s an important part of building engagement and community – or so the experts say. Let’s dive in.

The Most Popular Post or Page apart from the Home Page (obvs) was the post on Most Influential Antiguans and Barbudans. This started out as an ask on a friend’s facebook page that I decided to archive here on the site. Listed are some of the people we lost in 2020 like Edris Bird, Swallow, Joseph ‘Calypso Joe’ Hunte If 2020 has taught us anything this year it’s how fragile everything is, life, reality, our sense of what tomorrow will bring. I always believe it’s important to recognize the people who put in the work and helped shape and define our culture; this year just underscored and put that in bold.

Andre Warner, pictured with the Alstyne Allen Memorial Challenge Plaque, sponsored by the Best of Books, was co-winner of the Wadadli Pen challenge 2020 with youngest winner to date 11-year-old Cheyanne Darroux.

The Second Most Popular Post or Page was Wadadli Pen 2020 (which, God willing, will be flipping to Wadadli Pen 2021 soon) and the Fourth Most Popular was Who Won What in 2020? (referring to our annual writing challenge), while About Wadadli Pen (summarizing our work 2004 to date) was our Fifth Most Popular. The work we do at Wadadli Pen being this blog’s reason for being, I”d, of course, be happier if either of these was number one but I get it. Every year we’re able to keep this thing going even as our lives get more stretched is a miracle, but our passion endures. We had several people asking about the Challenge after it wrapped this year, by the way. So we invite you, while you’re, here give the blog a follow to give us a boost and ensure that you never miss any of our content again.

The Third Most Popular Post or Page was Antiguan and Barbudan Writings which I am personally happy to see because we work hard on keeping the records updated and, frankly, the new publications are coming so fast and furious these days, it isn’t easy. That said, if you are releasing new books, email us (wadadlipen@gmail.com) the details per the page’s format, so that we can keep the reading public informed and enter you in to the ‘official’ Antiguan and Barbudan canon. #fortherecord Oh and look up, I rotate covers randomly in the site banner at least quarterly as an extra way of giving our authors a boost.

Our calypso/music posts were also popular this year (likely for research purposes) and so our Sixth (Short Shirt’s Top 100), Seventh (Antiguan and Barbudan song writers), Eighth (Nobody Go Run Me (lyrics)), and Ninth (Antiguan and Barbudan Cultural Icon – Paul King Obstinate Richards) Most Popular posts were all about the calypso music.

From the Harper Collins catalogue images of Big Cat books including Turtle Beach by Antiguan and Barbudan author and Wadadli Pen team member Barbara Arrindell.

And I’m glad to see that something new (and publishing related) made the top Ten as the Tenth Most Popular post is Collins Readies Rollout of #OwnVoices Caribbean Children’s Books. Hopefully that means lots of sales. You can pre-order now.

As usual, we give a boost to the least viewed/least popular posts of the year as well. There are a bunch of them at basically the same level, so I’ll just put 10 I like at random (blogger’s privilege). Meeting Ashley Bryan – about my introduction to the famed award winning children’s writer who happens to have Antiguan and Barbudan roots, You and Your Wiki Caribbean Writers edition – in which I spoke about the need for us to create wikis for our Caribbean talent (not a cause=effect but I subsequently got, through no involvement of my own, my own wiki), Culture must be Free – Latumba (one of my favourite songs by one of my favourite calypsonians and the project to transcribe as many of our lyrics as we can continues), After Reading In the Black this is a book edited by Althea Prince and for those looking to read the Black experience in this year of Black Lives Matter worth revisiting right now, A Barbuda Adventure – the sister island’s been on my mind a lot lately and in this piece a prize recipient (actually someone who accompanied one of our recipients of a prize from Barbuda Express) reminds us of what’s so beautiful and precious about it (what should be preserved not crushed and run over by capitalist blindness), Wadadli Stories Q & A – this is 2017 event is last of our community literary festivals and that’s kind of a shame,
(image of Wadadli Pen prize recipients at the 2017 book fair – photo by Linisa George of Art. Culture. Antigua.)

Tell the People the Truth (lyrics) – another addition to our lyrics project and a reminder that you can help by submitting lyrics and credits, verified, for our data bases, You Feel Dat – from the Wadadli Pen open mic series, Re Resources, Opportunities, and More – telling you about some of the other work of the blog, and Read Beyond – because we all should be reading beyond our comfort zone.

Jamaican author Diana McCaulay is one of the Caribban authors interviewed in one of the blog’s most popular new postings of the year.

ETA: I should probably clarify that, unlike previous best ofs, this post wasn’t specific to posts or pages made in the year of popularity. That list takes considerably more time, usually, to pull together; so some of these posts and pages are years old. But I decided to do a quick scan of the insights to see if I could at least pull out which 2020 posts landed well. The who won what in 2020 and Collins posts already listed above are the top ones, followed by the 2020 Wadadli Pen short list announcement, and winning 2020 Challenge entries Two Worlds Collide, A New World, The Fabled Truth, Tom, the Ninja Crab, and The Beast of Barbados. At about number 5 most popular was the first post in the series of exclusive interviews with Caribbean writers on publishing – lessons, breakthroughs, and rights. Also making the top 10 of popular posts posted this year is the 2020 challenge patrons post (which is important in attracting future patronage, so thanks).

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, With Grace and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure). All Rights Reserved. Seriously, a lot of time, energy, love and frustration goes in to researching and creating content for this site; please don’t just take it up just so without even a please, thank you or credit. If you enjoyed it, check out my page on WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Wadadli Pen 2020: Post-Awards (A Virtual Gallery)

We weren’t able to have actual live awards this year (the awards announcement was done via facebook live and our release was sent out to the media– thanks to the Daily Observer, 268today, Antiguanewsroom, and anyone else who ran it). We do have pictures, though, ‘thanks’ to our drawn out post-awards season of trying to connect winners with their prizes. An unexpected side-benefit of having to do so much communication virtually is the patrons, parents, and participants who’ve stopped to look back and share their thoughts and pictures. We appreciate it and are delighted to share with you…

This picture from long time patron Frank B. Armstrong’s rep, presenting main prize winner (tied) Andre J. P. Warner (author of A Bright Future for Tomorrow) with his $500 cheque from the company, while both modelling good mask etiquette (in light of the global pandemic that forced a change in our usual award protocols as it has in facial wear, personal space, and hygiene all over the country and the world – remember to keep #socialdistancing and #besafe).

This picture of Andre who tied with 11 year old Cheyanne Darroux (author of Tom, the Ninja Crab) for the main prize – their names will be on the Alstyne Allen Memorial Challenge Plaque (pictured) and also won the 18 to 35 and Imagine an Future/Climate Change prize was sent to us by the Best of Books, our usual awards host, plaque sponsor, and longtime patron, which contributed a selection of books to each 2020 finalist. Andre’s book haul also includes local authors‘ Brenda Lee Browne’s London Rocks and Just Write journal and Joanne C. Hillhouse’s Musical Youth (hard cover edition), and US$250 worth of books sponsored by Sean Lyons (a NYC-based recent tourist who contributed US$500 worth of books which was divided between the two main prize winners). Winners’ choice.

This image of 13 to 17 winner D’Chaiya Emmanuel (author of Two Worlds Collide) is also from Best of Books, where she picked up her books contributed by the bookstore, her gifts from Juneth Webson (who contributed gift packages which were shared among several winners and the $500 which went toward Andre’s climate change prize), cash from Lawrence Jardine (who contributed $500 which was divided among the 13 to 17s), $200 from D. Gisele Isaac, a free eye exam from Paradise Vision Center, and an external hard drive from the Cushion Club (which also sent us an image of their gift wrapped prize).

Zaniah Pigott (author of A Mermaid), who was 3rd 7 to 12 and received books from Best of Books, Cindy’s Bookstore (as did all winners 7 to 12), and copies of Musical Youth and With Grace (both paperback) from Joanne C. Hillhouse.

Congrats to them all. You can read their stories and all winning stories through the years, here. Thanks to the ones who dropped us a line. Such as…

Aria-Rose Browne (author of The Fabled Truth, and 3rd placed 13 to 17, who won Musical Youth, cash from Lawrence Jardine, the books from the Best of Books, and the gift from Juneth Webson): “I would like to thank you all so much for both the opportunity and rewards. I am so thankful to have made it as a Short Lister much less third place, especially as this is my first writing competition. I really appreciate, and thank you from the bottom of my heart and I will be sure to keep writing.”

Andre J. P. Warner: “…excellent job for organizing Wadadli pen for another year once again.”

Dyna, mom of Sienna Harney-Barnes (author of A New World, honourable mention 7 to 12, who won books from Cindy’s Bookstore and Best of Books in addition to The Wonderful World of Yohan and Antigua My Antigua, contributed by the authors Floree Williams Whyte and Barbara Arrindell, respectively): “Thank you so much. Sienna was tickled pink to be acknowledged. She truly enjoyed the experience.”

Zaniah: “Hello Joanne, Thank you so much for the experience you and Wadadli Pen have provided. It was such a fun time and I’m very thankful for all the help you have given to allow me to advance so far. I have read some of the other stories and they are all interesting and fun. I will still strive to write better stories and hope to enter with my brother next year.”

Her mother wrote as well: “Thank you so much for these books for my avid reader Zaniah. Zaniah and I are very grateful for this opportunity for her to showcase her story telling.”

You know what I appreciate most about these notes, that hint that each writer feels encouraged to continue writing – that’s the goal. Finally, I encourage you to join these dope people whose feedback I found here and on social media, and leave a comment beneath the winning stories.

“I read both winning entries (A Bright Future for Tomorrow and Tom, the Ninja Crab) and thoroughly enjoyed both but I especially loved the one that was written by the young lady (Tom, the Ninja Crab) because I got to share it with my granddaughter and great niece.”

“Great poem, I hope he continues to keep up the poetry writing even with the demands of medicine. Excellent and evocative.” (this refers to Oh, Beach that I once Loved by Sethson Burton, 3rd place 18 to 35, winner of books from Best of Books and a copy of Musical Youth, 2nd edition paperback)

Those are the major ones; there were some awesomes and wonderfuls thrown in there. Add yours, or constructive criticism, that’s okay too, just don’t be …unconstructive.

Thanks again to all of you who have supported the 2020 Wadadli Pen Challenge Season, to patrons the Cultural Development Division, the Best of Books bookstore, Photogenesis, Cindy’s Bookstore, the Friends of Antigua Public Library-NY, Barbara Arrindell, Joanne C. Hillhouse, Floree Williams Whyte, Lawrence Jardine, D. Gisele Isaac, Paradise Vision Center, Juneth Webson, the Cushion Club, Brenda Lee Browne, Hermitage Bay Antigua, Dr. Hazra Medica, Caribbean Reads Publishing, Sean Lyons, Jane Seagull, and Frank B. Armstrong/Seven Seas.

 

As with all content on wadadlipen.wordpress.com, except otherwise noted, this is written by Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Musical Youth, With Grace, Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure, its Spanish language edition Perdida! , and Oh Gad! ). All Rights Reserved. If you enjoyed it, check out my page Jhohadli or like me on Facebook. Help me spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. You can also subscribe to the site to keep up with future updates. Thanks.

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Wadadli Pen Diary – Why Youth Creativity Matters

Part of our promotion strategy which over the years and this year has variously included media releases and notices, media interviews, social media promotion with flyers and by other means, direct mailing to select mailing lists including schools, youth workers, past participants, etc., blog posts like this one, ads, psas, etc. etc. By whatever means we can. This post is a copy of a mail sent recently to teachers. Feel free to share. 

Teachers have always been a vital part of the Wadadli Pen ecosystem. This image is from the 2014 awards ceremony and teacher (then at T N Kirnon school at the time) Paula Russell Peters, centre, is pictured collecting one of her prizes. She was a finalist for the WP 10th anniversary Teachers Prize and also collected on behalf of T N Kirnon which netted a prize for the most submissions from a single school. One of her students was also a finalist. 

 

Encouraging youth creativity is about encouraging self-expression. This can be purely fun and about self-discovery; it can also open a portal to expressing and coping with challenging feelings and experiences. Encouraging youth creativity also promotes mental growth, potentially improving academic performance and emotional maturity. Encouraging youth creativity gives young people an opportunity to try new things, new ways of seeing, new ways of thinking, and new ways of problem solving. The ‘Imagine a Future’ special prize in this year’s Wadadli Pen Challenge, for instance, will create an opportunity to explore the potentials of action or inaction on climate change – the existential challenge of our day – do we survive and how. This may emerge as a dystopian shadowland or a bright sci fi future. Who knows? As small islands, we are on the front lines of climate change; it’s an opportunity for young people to think through what will be the first major battle of their life time, for bad or good. If you are a youth in Barbuda, you have been in the headlines at least since 2017 and hurricane Irma, the trauma of which you may not have fully explored even as you grapple with historical and political realities beyond your understanding, where is your voice in this, what’s your story? ‘The Wa’omani Prize’ is an opportunity to remember that there are no small stories, that every experience matters – from fishing with your dad/mom to being in the path of a storm to end all storms. The Wadadli Pen Challenge is not fixed on a theme – tell any story you want, about anything you want, however you want – but it is Caribbean, simply because we must centre our own imagination in our own stories. Storytelling is an opportunity to explore us. At the same time, it is an opportunity to experience our reality from a different perspective – where did the frigates go when they flew away …from the perspective of a frigate. For people working with young people it’s an opportunity to ask what if… allowing the imagination to zig from reality to fantasy and back again. The 3-strip comic panel is a challenge for those better at expressing themselves using visuals than words because visuals too can tell a full story filled with drama, humor, warmth, etc. Writers and artists can even collaborate for full expression of an idea. The important thing is that they feel the freedom to tell their story and the joy that self-expression can bring.

Hopefully, you’ll see the magic in that and encourage your children to create and submit by February 16th 2020. We urge you to post the flyer(s) at minimum but also to more actively encourage their participation, not just for the opportunity to win the schools book prize for most submissions, nor for the individual prizes they could win, but to encourage their creativity.

For full guidelines and submission form, visit https://wadadlipen.wordpress.com/wadadli-pen-2020

-Wadadli Pen founder coordinator, Joanne C. Hillhouse

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One for the Caribbean

I posted here before about the Caribbean writers long listed for the Commonwealth short story prize. So, it’s only fitting that I come back to let you know that one of those four has won the prize. She is Ingrid Persaud of Trinidad & Tobago, and her story is The Sweet Sop.

Here’s a link to the announcement.

Here’s a link to Persaud’s winning story.

Here are the finalists all gathered with one of the judges. That’s Ingrid to the far left of the image. (Photo borrowed from http://commonwealthfoundation.com/blog/occasional-hum-commonwealth-short-story-prize)

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Caribbean Poets Forward

The 26th annual Forward Prizes will be awarded on September 21, 2017, at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre in London. Among the writers on the shortlist there are Caribbean writers such as: Ishion Hutchinson (Port Antonio, Jamaica); Malika Booker (of Guyanese and Grenadian parentage); and Richard Georges (Port of Spain, Trinidad). [Caribbean writers Vahni Capildeo and […]

via Forward Prizes 2017: Shortlists — Repeating Islands

The Forward Prizes for Poetry are the most coveted awards for poetry published in Britain and Ireland: they have played a key role in bringing contemporary poetry to the attention of the wider public for quarter of a century. They were set up in 1991 by philanthropist William Sieghart to celebrate excellence in poetry and increase its audience, and are awarded to published poets for work in print in the last year. The three prizes – £10,000 for Best Collection, £5,000 for Best First Collection and £1,000 for Best Single Poem – are unique in honouring both the work of established poets and the debuts of brilliant unknowns. Past Forward Prizes winners include Claudia Rankine, Thom Gunn, Seamus Heaney, Alice Oswald, Ted Hughes, Carol Ann Duffy and Kathleen Jamie.

Among the writers on the shortlist there are Caribbean writers such as: Ishion Hutchinson (Port Antonio, Jamaica); Malika Booker (of Guyanese and Grenadian parentage); and Richard Georges (from Port of Spain, Trinidad and resident in the British Virgin Islands). [Caribbean writers Vahni Capildeo and Tiphanie Yanique were among last year’s Forward Prizes winners.]

 

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Antiguans and Barbudans Awarded

Here, Wadadli Pen will be celebrating award wins (including sometimes award nominations and long and shortlisting, and  accolades received) by Antiguan and Barbudan writers. It came about because I’d bump in to laudatory accomplishments (beyond publishing) but couldn’t figure out where to put them. The Antiguan and Barbuda Writings pages are bibliographies, and neither the Reviews page nor the journal publications page were right. So, here we go. Please note, this page is a work-in-progress. As with the other named sections, it will be updated somewhere between when I find updates and when I find the time to post them. I’m not ranking the awards at this point (some are local, some regional, some international, some prestigious, some not so much…I’m just adding them as I can). No omissions or errors (and there are plenty, no doubt) are intentional. As always if you have information that will help me flesh out the content, let me know. Conversely, if you wish to be removed, no problem, just let me know that too.

Wadadli Youth Pen Prize Challenge wins are not listed here but if you want to see the winners of that in-house prize through the years, go here.

2021 – 

Ripped Bodice Awards for Excellence in Romantic Fiction (2020) – Rilzy Adams, Go Deep. Adams has also been nominated for other books and other industry awards – Swoonies, Black Girls Who Write (Go Deep nominated for Best Black Erotica), and Rebel Women Lit readers choice among them (making it on to short lists in some cases).

Wadadli Pen 2020 winner Andre J. P. Warner’s winning story Bright Future for Tomorrow was awarded best short fiction in the first Rebel Women Lit Caribbean Readers Awards. Andre wins RWLWadadli Pen founder and coordinator Joanne C. Hillhouse was a RWL CRA honoree Joanne honoured RWL. There were several other nominees from the Wadadli Pen family and from Antigua and Barbuda; full list of nominees can be found here.

2020 –

Musical Youth named a Kirkus Reviews top 100 indie book of the year; also a top teen/young adult and top romance novel.

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s short story ‘Vincent’ was one of 21 stories long listed for the Brooklyn Caribbean Literary Festival Elizabeth Nunez Award for Writers in the Caribbean

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was longlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for the story ‘Shedding’

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots won the 2020 Bocas Prize for his poetry collection Epiphaneia

The Directorate of Gender Affairs held its first ever Women of Wadadli Awards – a number of artists were recipients – Heather Doram (visual artist) for Culture, Noreen Phillips for Fashion, Wadadli Pen founder and coordinator and author Joanne C. Hillhouse for Literature, Colleen Simpson (author of A Likkle Bit a Dis & a Likkle Bit a Dat) for Culinary Arts, dramatist, photographer, writer, and educator Zahra Airall for Fine Arts, Wadadli Pen partner and patron and a writer and dramatist in her own right Barbara Arrindell as a Change Maker, Marion Byron for Music, Mickel Brann for Media/Journalism, and Mako Williams, who is also a visual artist, for Science and Technology. Details in this WoW article in Observer

New Daughters of Africa edited by Margaret Busby nominated for an NAACP Image award in the literature category for fiction – it includes the short story ‘Evening Ritual’ by Joanne C. Hillhouse

2019 –

Richard Georges wins a fellowship to the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study – Georges is Trinidad born and lives in the BVI but he also has Antiguan roots


Winners of Flow Mobile Film Competition (Antigua and Barbuda) –

The top three winners in category 12-16 years
1st Sontee’ Beazer – “Independence”
2nd Jontae Cornelius -“What Independence Day Means to Me”
3rd Kaleb Kidane Hatton – “What does Independence mean to me”.

The top three winners from the category 17- 30 years old
1st Moses Wiltshire – “My Independence”
2nd Bernella Vidal – “What Independence Means To Me”
3rd Dalisha Spencer – “Independence”

The top three winners in the 31+ category
1st Romeo “Kulcha D” Reid – “Kulcha D Independence”
2nd Laune Isaac – “Reflections On Independence
3rd Colin John-Jenkins -“What Independence means to me”

CSSDF.jpgThe Antigua and Barbuda contingent at the Caribbean Secondary Schools’ Drama Festival won several awards: Best Production, Best Original Screenplay, The Aston Cooke Award for directing (Zahra Airall), Most Innovative Set Design, Best Sound Effects, Best Lighting Design, Best Actress (Khadelia Williams), and Best Overall Contingent (for their cooperation, interaction, conduct, and willingness to participate in activities throughout the festival).

Producer Mitzi Allen, and actresses Heather Doram and Julie Hewlett are three of four women in film award recipients at the Motion Picture Association of Antigua-Barbuda’s International Film Festival

Wadadli Pen 2018 winner Kyle Christian becomes a National Youth Awards winner in the literary arts category.

The PEN America Literary Awards Longlist The Circuit: A Tennis Odyssey by Rowan Ricardo Phillips longlisted for the PEN/ESPN AWARD FOR LITERARY SPORTS WRITING ($5,000) To honor a nonfiction book on the subject of sports published in 2018

Rowan Ricard Philips receives the Nicolás Guillén Outstanding Book Award for 2015’s Heaven

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was longlisted for the OCM Bocas Prize for his poetry collection Giant.

2018 – 

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was highly commended for the Forward Prize for his poetry collection Giant

2017 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was short listed for the Forward Prize for best first collection for his poetry collection Make Us All Islands

Ashley Bryan – Newbery Honor, Coretta Scott King Honor for writing and illustration, Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan

Althea Romeo Mark awarded the Arts and Science Poetry Prize for poems published in POEZY 21:Antologia Festivaluluiinternational Noptile De Poezie De Curtea De Arges, Curtea De Arges, Romania

Alexis Andrews wins the Donald Gosling Award for best television or film contribution at the Maritime Media Awards for Vanishing SailAlexis

Joanne C. Hillhouse nominated for the Astrid Lindgren prize

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s children’s picture book With Grace selected for the USVI Governor’s Summer Reading Challenge

Jamaica Kincaid is announced as winner of the Dan David Prize for being “one of the most important and influential writers today”. This prize is administered by Tel Aviv University

ink-awardSpilling Ink receives the Antigua and Barbuda National Youth Awards literary arts award

2016 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots won the Marvin E Williams prize from The Caribbean Writer for ‘X’ and was shortlisted for the Small Axe Poetry prize for ‘Darkening/Freeport’

Ashley Bryan – short-listed for the Kirkus Prize and received a Newberry Honor

Anisfield-Wolf book award + Griffin Poetry Prize for Heaven by Rowan Ricardo Philips

Joy Lawrence awarded Antigua and Barbuda’s OH – Officer of the Most Precious Order of Princely Heritage – during the Independence Day Ceremonial Parade

Tammi Browne-Bannister wins the Marguerite Cobb-McKay Prize from The Caribbean Writer

Chrys-ann Ambrose receives an Indie Author Legacy Award (non-fiction) for her book Operation Game-Plan. Held for the first time in 2016, the award was designed to specifically celebrate non-fiction literacy geared towards the promotion of social awareness, education and personal transformation

Zahra Airall wins Antigua and Barbuda’s National Youth Award in the literary arts category

2015 –

Richard Georges who was born in Trinidad and resides in the BVI but has Antiguan roots was shortlisted for the Wasifiri New Writing Prize – Poetry for ‘Bush Tea’

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is a Guggenheim Fellow

Angelica O’Donoghue wins National Youth Award Young Journalist Award and Asha Graham wins the NYA Literary Arts Award

Zahra Airall and the team from Antigua Girls High School win awards for costuming, lighting, acting, originality, writing, directing, and overall execution at the Antigua and Barbuda Secondary Schools Drama Festival

Antigua and Barbuda win at the Caribbean Secondary Schools Drama Festival – Best Supporting Actress (Onalie Lares), Most Promising Actress (Queenela Williams), Most Outstanding Performer (Jianna Minott)

Lady of Parham, a David Edgecombe play set in Antigua and Barbuda, is short listed for the Guyana Prize for Literature Caribbean Awards for Best Drama

Alexis Andrews wins the People’s Choice Award for Best Documentary at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival

Alexis Andrews’ film Vanishing Sails wins the Caribbean Spirit Award for Best Overall Feature at Canada’s Caribbean Tales awards

Joanne C. Hillhouse receives the Caribbean Writer Flash Fiction Prize for the story ‘When we Danced’.

Dorbrene O’Marde long-listed for the Bocas Prize for the Short Shirt biography Nobody Go Run Me

2014 –

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s Commonwealth Short Story submission ‘Amelia at Devil’s Bridge’ was selected for publication in Pepperpot: Best New Stories from the Caribbean – consisting entirely of brand-new stories by authors living in the region, gathered from among the very best entries to the Commonwealth Short Story Prize from islands throughout the Caribbean

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Before Columbus Foundation Book Award for See Now Then 

Melissa Gomez and Cinque Productions’ film Silent Music wins Best Documentary feature at the Maine Deaf Film Festival

Althea Prince is named by the Harbourfront Centre as a Canadian Literary Pioneer

with_grace-3d-standingJoanne C. Hillhouse’s fairytale ‘With Grace’ earns honourable mention in the Desi Writers Lounge fiction contest The story goes on to be published as a children’s picture book released in December 2016.

Tim Hector Award

Leonard Tim Hector Memorial Award to Joanne C. Hillhouse for contribution to journalism, literary arts, and youth development in Antigua and Barbuda

Accepting Burt Award trophyJoanne C. Hillhouse’s manuscript Musical Youth is first runner-up/second placed for the Burt Award for teen/young adult Caribbean fiction at the Bocas Lit Fest in Trinidad Musical Youth the book is released later in the year under the regional Caribbean Reads imprint

2013 –

Rowan Ricardo Philips is a Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award winner for poetry + NAACP Image Award finalist for Outstanding Literary Work, Poetry + PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award for Poetry winner + Whiting Award winner, for The Ground

silent-music-poster.pngMelissa Gomez’s film Silent Music wins the Audience Choice Award at the Toronto Deaf Film and Arts Festival

Tanya Evanson is Poet of Honour at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word & the Sheri-D Wilson Golden Beret Award

Glen Toussaint and Linisa George are National Youth Award winners for literary arts 

Brenda Lee Browne named as a finalist for the Hollick Arvon Caribbean Writers Prize administered by the Bocas Literary Festival

PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award & Whiting Writers’ Award to Rowan Ricardo Philips for The Ground

‘Amelia at Devil’s Bridge’ by Joanne C. Hillhouse is short listed for the Small Axe fiction prize.

Dorbrene receives Calypso Composer prize from the Wadadli Calypso Association

2012 –

Linisa George is selected as Antigua and Barbuda’s representative to the Poetry Parnassus festival in London, an Olympics adjacent event which included a representative from each participating country; her selection (Brown Girl in the Ring) was subsequently published in a collection called The World Record

Althea Prince is shortlisted as one of Canadian Immigrants Top 25 Immigrants

Ashley Bryan is awarded the Coretta Scott-King Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Ethnic & Multicultural Information Exchange Roundtable

Caribbean Canadian Literary Award for Outstanding Contribution to Caribbean Canadian Literature – from A Different Booklist, Toronto, to Althea Prince

Linisa George

Linisa George – National Youth Award for literary arts; the group she co-founded with Zahra Airall, Thomasine Greenaway, and Greschen Edwards (Women of Antigua) also claims a prize for Activism

silent-music-1Melissa Gomez’s Silent Music wins Best Documentary at the Caribbean Tales film festival

Joanne C. Hillhouse’s short story ‘Genevieve’ short listed for the Small Axe fiction prize

Mary Geo Quinn receives a Queen Elizabeth ll Diamond Jubilee Award for Education and Development of the Literary Arts

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is a Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist for poetry, for The Ground

2011 –

Tameka Jarvis-George wins the National Youth Awards lit arts award

Reggae Film Festival Awards – Tameka Jarvis-George receives a JFA Honour Award as director of short film Dinner at the Jamaica International Reggae Film Festival.

Iyaba Ibo Mandingo wins Yale University’s Martin Luther King Birthday Invitational Slam (his seventh such win; he is also a repeat winner of the Connecticut Grand Slam championship)

Kimolisa Mings wins Independence Literary Awards – poetry and overall (Antigua and Barbuda)

Shakeema Edwards (a Wadadli Pen alum) third placed (adult story category) Independence Literary Awards (Antigua and Barbuda)

Ryerson University Faculty Award-the Kay Livingstone Award-to Althea Prince

Brenda Lee Browne is awarded National Youth Award (Antigua and Barbuda) Lifetime Achievement Award

Caribbean Writer Award (2)Joanne C. Hillhouse receives the David Hough Literary Prize from the Caribbean Writer.

Joanne C. Hillhouse receives a certificate of recognition from JCI West Indies as one of Ten Outstanding Young Persons in the region.

2010 –

Ashley Bryan – Golden Kite Award for nonfiction, Ashley Bryan: Words to My Life’s Song

Redemption of Paradise by Dr. Noel Howell wins three prizes at the Jamaica Reggae Film Festival – including Best Caribbean Film and Best Actress (Macka Diamond of Jamaica)

Hazra Medica is named a Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest finalist for Ode to a Night in Ale

Education, Leadership, and Community Service Award – the Antigua Girls’ High School Alumni Association of North America, New York, USA – to Althea Prince

Dorbrene O’Marde receives the Friend of the Arts Sunshine Award

Zahra Airall and Linisa George win National Youth Awards (Antigua and Barbuda) for their promotion of the literary and theatrical arts

Rev. Denise Smith-Lewis wins poetry and story prize; and Shakeema Edwards wins the story prize in the 12 and 17 age category (also a runner-up, poetry and spoken word) in the Antigua and Barbuda Independence Literary Arts Competition

2009 –

Elizabeth Abbott’s Sugar: A Bittersweet History is short listed for the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

Althea Romeo-Mark is awarded the Marguerite Cobb McKay prize by The Caribbean Writer for the short story ‘Bitterleaf’ which had been published in 2008, Volume 22

Ashley Bryan receives the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award  for contribution to American children’s literature and the Wilder medal

Rev. Denise Smith-Lewis wins poetry prize in the Antigua and Barbuda Independence Literary Arts Competition

Mary Geo Quinn wins Independence Literary Arts Competition Award for adult fiction

2008 –

Ashley Bryan receives the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his book Let it Shine

Hazra Medica’s short story ‘The Banana Stains’ is Highly Commended in the Commonwealth Short Story competition

Ashley Bryan is named a Literary Lion by the New York Public Library alongside Salman Rushdie, Nora Ephron, and Edward Albee

Floree Williams (now Whyte) receives the (Antigua and Barbuda) National Youth Award for achievement in the literary arts; Zahra Airall also receives an NYA in this year

Howard and Mitzi Allen receives National Youth Awards as Pioneers in Filmmaking

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAV-Monologues literary prize to Shakeema Edwards from Women of Antigua; who that year also wins the Dancing Nude in the Moonlight Next Chapter contest sponsored by the Best of Books

Joanne C. Hillhouse received the Michael and Marilee Fairbanks International Fellowship to participate in the Breadloaf Writers Conference.

2007 –

National Awards – Officer of the Most Precious Order of Princely Heritage, OH – Dr. Bille Dyer & Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of the Nation, KCN – Keithlyn Smith 

Althea Prince

Althea Prince receives the Antigua and Barbuda International Literary Festival Award for Excellence in the Literary Arts

2006 –

Ashley Bryan – U.S. nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award (the highest recognition for creators of children’s books)

Carolyn Providence is nominated for the Best Spoken Word album at the National Underground Spoken Word and Poetry Awards.

Vivian Michael and teen novelist Akilah Jardine receive (Antigua and Barbuda) National Youth Awards for achievement in the literary arts; Joanne C. Hillhouse is named honourable mention.

Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda’s Jubilee Award for Outstanding Contributions and Achievements in the Field of Arts and Culture to Althea Prince

The Marguerite Cobb McKay Literary Prize from The Caribbean Writer  to Edgar O. Lake

2005 –

Ashley Bryan – the Atlanta Literary Festival was named for him and he also received the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion from the Fay B. Kaigler Children’s Book Festival

The Marguerite Cobb McKay Literary Prize from The Caribbean Writer & The Leonard Tim Hector Annual Lecture Memorial Award from the Leonard Tim Hector Memorial Committee to Edgar O. Lake

2004 –

Ashley Bryan receives the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his book Beautiful Blackbird

Joanne C. Hillhouse, Joy Lawrence, Sylvanus Barnes, and others received a UNESCO Honour Award for contribution to literacy and the literary arts in Antigua and Barbuda

2002 –

Motion won the 2002 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation National Poetry Face-Off competition.

Mary Geo Quinn Highly Commended for her short story ‘Joe’, an entry for the Commonwealth short story prize

2001 –

East Midland Arts New Writers Award to Brenda Lee Browne

2000 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Prix Femina étranger for My Brother

Arnold Prince receives a Lifetime Achievement Award from the University of Rhode Island

Mary Geo Quinn receives the King of Redonda literary award for her memoir Recollections

1999 –

Lannan Literary Award for fiction to Jamaica Kincaid

1998 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for Ashley Bryan’s ABC of American Poetry

1997 –

Jamaica Kincaid’s The Autobiography of My Mother is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction (USA), the PEN Faulkner Award , and Boston Book Review Fisk Fiction Prize; also a National Book Award nominee for My Brother

PEN American Writers Fund Award to Edgar O. Lake

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for The Autobiography of My Mother

1995 –

Althea Romeo Mark’s story ‘Easter Sunday’ wins the Stauffacher English Short Story Competition/Switzerland

1992 –

Joanne C. Hillhouse second placed in the Rick James Ensemble One Act Play Competition with the play ‘Barman’s Blues’; Zahra Airall wins a prize in that same competition as the Youngest person to enter

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour award from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for All Night, All Day: a Child’s First Book of African American Spirituals

Jamaica Kincaid claims the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Award

1991 –

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre “CHOICE AWARD” for children’s book: How The East-Pond Got Its Flowers – Althea Prince

1988 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Illustrator honour award from the Coretta Scott King Book Awards for What a Morning! The Christmas Story in Black Spirituals

1987 –

Ashley Bryan receives an Author honor from the Coretta Scott King Awards for his book Lion and the Ostrich Chicks and Other African Folk Tales

1986 –

Mary Geo Quinn receives an Eastern Caribbean Authors of Excellence Award

Ashley Bryan – Coretta Scott King Honor for writing and illustration, Lion and the Ostrich Chicks and Other African Folk Tales

1985 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship for Fiction

1984 –

Jamaica Kincaid receives the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award for fiction

Shortlisted for the PEN Faulkner Award for At the Bottom of the River – Jamaica Kincaid

1983 –

Ashley Bryan wins an Illustrator honor from the Coretta Scott King Awards for I’m Going to Sing: Black American Spirituals

Jamaica Kincaid’s At the Bottom of the River wins the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and is nominated for the PEN/Faulkner Award

1981 –

Ashley Bryan – Coretta Scott King Award for illustration, Beat the Story Drum, Pum-Pum

1979 –

Alexander Sideris Fine Arts Award to Mali Olatunji for his image ‘Solitude in Fall’ which can be seen in The Art of Mali Olatunji by Mali Olatunji and Paget Henry

1974 –

Althea Romeo Mark’s poem ‘Old No-Teeth Mama’ wins the poetry award at Cuyahoga Community Writers Conference

1969 –

Quill & Scroll Award, Fort Benjamin Harrison Journalism Award, Indiana to Edgar O. Lake

1934 –

Roy H. S. Dublin’s Tomorrow’s Blossoms, first published in 1934 to commemorate the tercentenary year of the colonization of Antigua and the centenary year of emancipation, is awarded the King’s Medal

Date unknown, unsure, unconfirmed –

Althea Romeo Mark wins a scholarship to the Breadloaf Writers’ Conference

PEN Award for his journalistic work to Leonard Tim Hector

***

As with all content on Wadadli Pen, except otherwise noted, this is written by Antiguan and Barbudan writer Joanne C. Hillhouse (author of The Boy from Willow Bend, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight, Oh Gad!, Musical Youth, Dancing Nude in the Moonlight 10th Anniversary Edition and Other Writings, With Grace, and Lost! A Caribbean Sea Adventure; also a freelance writer, editor, writing coach and workshop facilitator). All Rights Reserved. If you like the content here follow or recommend the blog, also, check out my page on Amazon, WordPress, and/or Facebook, and help spread the word about Wadadli Pen and my books. Thank you.

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Announcement re the Guyana Prize for Literature

        August 17, 2015

The Guyana Prize for Literature has had cause to reschedule its time-table this year, and will not announce the Shortlist until after Carifesta XII, mainly because of the scheduling of the Regional Festival itself.

This is as a result of the closeness of the dates for the Guyana Prize activities to those of Carifesta.  Some members of the Jury for both the Guyana Prize and the Caribbean Awards who are from other countries outside of Guyana, advised that they are involved in Carifesta on behalf of their own countries, and their availability would be made easier by a shifting of the dates.  Earlier in the year when the Guyana Prize rescheduled its time-table for 2015, there had been no confirmation that Haiti would host Carifesta this year as originally planned in 2013.

We are therefore avoiding the month of August for all Guyana Prize activities and are not in a position to announce the Shortlist as previously planned.  This will now be done in September.  The date for the Awards Ceremony will then be advertised along with a literary festival that is expected to accompany it.
Yours faithfully
Al Creighton
Guyana Prize for Literature
and Caribbean Awards.

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ALBA Prize – Call for Nominations

The Bolivarian Alliance for Our America (In spanish: ALBA), through its Cultural ALBA Grannacional Project, announces the ALBA Prize in Literature and the ALBA Prize in Arts for the work of a lifetime, for 2014.

BASES:

  • The Prizes will go to alive creators who have constantly dedicated their lives and work to enrich the Latin-American and Caribbean cultural heritage through original contributions in any literary genre and art expression, and who have outstandingly contributed to enhance the common and, at the same time, diverse values which conform our peoples’ community, favoring our people’s emancipation and their cultural decolonization.
  • The nominations to the Prizes should be submitted by associations of writers and artists, universities and academic institutions, regional cultural entities and others identified with the spirit of these Prizes. In every case, some basic information about the nominating entity should be submitted too.
  • The suggestions should be presented in legal form subscribed by the named authority and specifying the Prize she/he is being nominated in (Literature or Arts). It will include a properly substantiated short biography of the nominee, in no more than five (5) sheets.
  • The jury, one for both Prizes, will be integrated by outstanding personalities of the Latin-American and Caribbean culture. The jury’s decision will be based on the submitted nominations and its own nominations proposed; the jury is not empowered to not award any of the Prizes.
  • The nominations should be emailed to premios@albacultural.cult.cu and submissions deadline is November 30, 2014. Suggestions not abiding to the above-mentioned stipulations will be disregarded.
  • There is no right of appeal against the jury’s verdict, which will be informed at a date that will be announced on time.
  • Each Prize (in Literature and in Arts) will be one and indivisible, consisting in a symbolic trophy and cash prize amounting seventy-five thousand American dollars (75,000.00 USD).

For further information: http://www.albacultural.org / premios@albacultural.cult.cu

Awarded ALBA Prizes: 

Literature                                                    Year                                            Arts 

Mario Benedetti (Uruguay)                           2007                 Oscar Niemeyer (Brazil)

Roberto Fernández Retamar (Cuba)           2008                 Jorge Sanjinés (Bolivia)

Frei Betto (Brazil)                                         2009                 León Ferrari (Argentina)

Luis Britto García (Venezuela)                    2010                  Silvio Rodríguez (Cuba)

George Lamming (Barbados)                      2011           Santiago García (Colombia)

Eduardo Galeano (Uruguay)                       2012                   Alicia Alonso (Cuba)

Click here for More Opportunities. (Use search feature to the right if the link is broken).

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CONGRATS, Kei!

The shortlist of seven works for the 2014 International Dylan Thomas Prize, the world’s biggest literary prize for young writers, was announced in the poet’s home town of Swansea – in his centenary year – on the evening of Thursday 4 September.

Dylan Thomas Prize logoThis year’s shortlist includes poetry, prose and drama, and is extremely international, with writers drawing on a rich mix of background influences: Wales, England, Ireland, Jamaica, the United States, Russia and New Zealand.  It was announced by musician and radio presenter Cerys Matthews, one of the judges for the Prize.

The £30,000 Prize, sponsored by Swansea University, is awarded to the best published or produced literary work in the English language, written by an author aged 39 or under. It celebrates and nurtures international literary excellence across all genres and is open to novels, short stories, poetry and drama.

The 2014 shortlist is:

•    Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries (Granta)
•    Joshua Ferris, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour (Viking)
•    Eimear McBride, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing (Faber & Faber)
•    Kseniya Melnik, Snow in May (Fourth Estate)
•    Kei Miller, The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion (Carcanet Press)
•    Owen Sheers, Mametz (National Theatre Wales)
•    Naomi Wood, Mrs Hemingway (Picador)

READ MORE.

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