Tag Archives: Ya Ya Surfeit

Yeah Yeah for Ya Ya

I wrote this after attending the Antigua launch of Chadd’s cumberbatch Ya Ya Surfeit back in August 2010. The option to publish wasn’t picked up by any of the usual suspects. But, hey, that’s what blogs are for. Here then are reflections on a beautfiul night. Photos by Marcella Andre.

That's Marcella, far right; yes, she's talented like that...the photog and the subject...also pictured, far left the night's emcee Brenda Lee Browne, artist extraordinaire Heather Doram next to her, y yo.

By Joanne C. Hillhouse

Ya Ya Surfeit; translation, plenty chat. When Montserratian Chadd Cumberbatch

Chadd

 launched the book here recently there was plenty of something else; laughter – I mean, laugh until you belly hurt you laughter.

The Best of Books @ Royal Palm launch was, frankly, not well attended  but it was full in every way that counted.

The poetry collection, which enjoyed a theatrical launch at home earlier in the summer, travels well. It helps that Cumberbatch, no stranger to either stage or movie lights, brought to the reading, the ease and charisma of a natural storyteller. The effortless chemistry between Cumberbatch and radio personality Marcella Andre, who also participated in the Montserrat launch, was a plus.

The stripped down presentation and smaller venue, meanwhile, allowed for a certain intimacy not just with the performers but the words. Certainly, it allowed even those of us who’ve read this poetry collection and witnessed the coming alive of favourite pieces at the previous launch, hear the words as if for the first time; I mean really hear them, and be tickled or moved anew as a result.

As with the book itself, the pieces chosen for the Antigua launch were well ordered, beginning, rightly, with the reflective Ascent to Grace before picking up the pace with the defiant Emancipation and the caustic Fences – the latter capturing well the attitudes of some to the all-a-we-is-one-family sentiment and having fun with the words. “So hall you bauxite”, therefore, emerges as the kiss-off it is when dependent only on the sound of the words for the meaning, a reminder that so many of the pieces in this collection, while they read well, really feel meant for the stage or some sort of audio recording. At other times the visual is so clear – “with a flick of her plastic, blonde weave” – the layers of meaning immediately reveal themselves. That’s from Buy Local, which ends with the sarcastic, “It is her religion to take communion at Western Union”.

Cumberbatch went to great lengths to reiterate – perhaps overmuch – that not all the pieces reflect his lived experiences. But certainly Daily Bread, the seed of which was planted during a tedious staff meeting at his day job, is. It was Andre’s favourite piece and she declared  we could all relate to:

“Lord de wuk

De never-ending-forever day wuk

De hustle

De sweat

De back and forth

De forth and back…

And the meeting

And the other meeting

And the meeting to plan the next meeting

About the briefing

About the memo

Re de missive from de Ministry

Cause de Boss say

De minister say…”

You get the idea.

And for everyone who’s ever been to a pageant, Priscilla, featuring “…Peggy daughter, the one wey look like one ‘O’” was no less relatable, easily earning the biggest laughs of the night – the kind of laugh where you swear somebody’s about to tek een. Well, to be honest, the competition for biggest laugh of the night tug-o-warred between this and the three-man skit On the Block which wondered, what do women want?

The pieces in what Cumberbatch described as the “love zone” earned a different kind of laughter, more subdued, more the laughter of commiseration; I’ve-been-there-I-know-what-that’s-like kind of laughter. From Monday to On Rumpled Sheets to Crescent to Grey to Confessions of a Love Sick Fool, the pieces tracked love’s slow unraveling: such as “Tonight I’ll slip away from you and you will never know because you don’t see me anymore” (from Wakening) and “I fell hard like a rock/hard like granite/hard like diamond/heavy like a stone/and I shattered…like glass” (from I Fell).

The encore came via the poet’s reading of one of his favourite pieces, Conversation with Cheese. It was a reminder of the real life relatability, layers of meaning, and sly humour of the well-worth-buying collection. In it, a young boy asks a Rasta – Cheese? – why he smokes weed. The answer comes via the Bible and, specifically, how Moses received the epiphany that led him to Pharaoh’s door precipitating the Israelites’ exit from Egypt: “through the burning bush”.

Chadd signs copies for his fans including Antiguan artist/actress Heather D.

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus, Caribbean Plus Lit News

Ya Ya Surfeit launches in Antigua

Former Culture Director and celebrated artist and costume designer, Heather Doram, receives her signed copy from Cumberbatch at the Antigua launch of his book. (Photo by Marcella Andre)

Here’s what I wrote after travelling to Montserrat for the launch of Chadd Cumberbatch’s Ya Ya Surfeit: “Even so, his book, with its balance of humour and pathos, layers upon layers of meaning; its insight to and balanced presentation of the male and female psyche, its uniquely Caribbean (and especially Montserratian) perspective on things, and searing honesty will be a revelation. The words feel alive on the page. Imagine then how much more exciting it was to see them leap to life”.

A trimmer but no less enjoyable presentation of the work took place Saturday August 21st at the Best of Books at Royal Palm.

If you haven’t already pick up a copy of this book today. You won’t regret it.

Now you may be wondering why feature a Montserratian writer on an Antiguan site, but quite apart from the fact that Antigua and Montserrat are kissing cousins, there’s the fact that Chadd has made his mark on the Antiguan artistic scene.

Have you seen his performance in the Antiguan film, No Seed?

Leave a comment

Filed under A & B Lit News Plus